Go Media Podcast – Episode 13: Interviews With Nick Disabato and Caroline Moore

In this episode, we sit down with WMC Fest Speakers Nick Disabato and Caroline Moore. We talk to Nick about his experience as an interaction designer and publisher from Chicago. And we talk to Caroline about her experience as a photographer for both metal shows and weddings. Simon joins us once again to give us the low down on a new texture pack that’s now available at The Arsenal.

Listen to the Podcast

[powerpress] [iframe width=”100%” height=”166″ scrolling=”no” frameborder=”no” src=”https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F103123813&auto_play=false&show_artwork=true&color=ff7700″]

Show Notes

Sponsor of this Episode

Cover art for this episode was also created using Dustin Schmieding’s Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack. You can find this vector pack and more at arsenal.gomedia.us

Links

Credits

Hosts: Jeff Finley and Bill Beachy Producer: Bryan Garvin Recorded at: Go Media

Sponsorship Opportunities

Interested in sponsoring the Go Media podcast, either episodically or exclusively? Well, hit us up at [email protected] if you are interested in advertising your business. Or, take part in our blind auction.

What Do You Think?

We want to hear what you think about the latest episode of our podcast and what topics you would like to see covered in upcoming episodes. Comment below with your suggestions.

Ready for More?

Keep learning and listening to more Go Media podcasts!

Announcing the Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack! - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html

Announcing the Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack!

Dustin does it again!

The Valleys in the Vinyl founder (who just released some cool neon textures) is back with a vengeance. After the microscopic fingerprints textures and the fractal space pack, he has yet another very unique set ready for us today.

Introducing the Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack

Announcing the Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack! - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html

The pack includes 15 unique textures, coming in both JPGs and transparent PNGs (30 files in total).

The “subject” at hand this time is a series of renders of a 3D element that looks like a sound wave, taken out of these cool Winamp visualization plugins we were crazy about in the early 2000’s (remember Geiss, WhiteCap, or G-Force?). I’d say Winamp is a strange piece of software. I personally use Foobar 2000 to play my music… but I digress. Let’s have a look at the files instead.

The content

Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html Wireframe Sound Wave Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/wireframe-sound-wave-texture-pack.html

These could be used to quickly add a digital feel to a piece, contrasting with a nature scene for instance. Here’s a quick example I put together in two minutes way too quickly, using this photo as my base:

gma-2013-07-24-quick-experimentation-with-soundwave-wireframe-textures-1920x1280

Want to download the PSD to see how I colored the textures and edited the image? Follow this link to my Dropbox.

Conclusion

These are versatile and can give that unique finishing touch to your design. You know you should grab them while they’re hot.

On that note, that’s all I have for today. Until next time, cheers!

— Simon, the Arsenal Manager

PS: we’re prepping a cool goodie for next week. Stay tuned.

What’s Go Media Been Up To?

Well Hello!

All’s well here at Go Media!

Storefront renovations are moving along swimmingly, with progress apparent every single day!

We have windows, folks!
We have windows, folks!

The Countdown is On!

We’re counting down the moments until Weapons of Mass Creation Fest 2013!   We’re busy assuring that our awesome Kickstarter backers get their handsome rewards, responding to speaker, designer, band and sponsor questions as well as collecting goodies for promotional tote bags.  Last but not least we’re tying up the seemingly thousands of other loose ends that come with planning the best-fest-in-the-Midwest!

Posters are in ... and ... boxes, boxes everywhere!  WMC Fest goodies surround us!
Posters are in! … and … Boxes, boxes everywhere! WMC Fest goodies surround us!

Intern Mania!

Alex Miller | Carly Utegg | Kyle Miller | Nathaniel Scramling
Alex Miller | Carly Utegg | Kyle Miller | Nathaniel Scramling

Interns have taken over our office this summer!  Four awesome additions, including Carly Utegg from Edinboro University in Edinboro, Pennsylvania, Alex Miller from Kent State in Kent, Ohio, Kyle Saxton from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, and Nathaniel Scramling from Virginia Marti College right here in Cleveland, have descended upon Go Media to help us out in a multitude of ways. These four talented students have assisted with the Arsenal, Mockup Everything, Bill Beachy‘s book design, our storefront’s upcoming window designs as well as varying client projects.

Now let’s see…

What The Team Has Been Up To:

 Aaron Roberts

  • Finishing up the identity for Cantine, a Bar & Bottle Shop opening in Broadview Heights 
  • Identity & Website designs for the upcoming Ditka Dash,  a fun run commemorating Mike Ditka (former coach of the Chicago Bears) and the retirement of his jersey in December of this year.
  • Invitation and collateral designs for this year’s NEOSA CIO Symposium

 Bryan Garvin

  • Continued to sift through resumes and portfolios for our open Front-End Developer position.
  • Continued to push projects forward using Foundation 4 from prototype/wireframes to front-end development.
  • Fell in love with Sass.
  • Worked with Jeff to use Soundcloud for the Podcast, but finding it difficult to find the actual download file to bring into Blubrry. So, we’re now just hosting in two locations (Amazon S3 and Soundcloud).
  • Ran our first official live recording of the Go Media podcast as we interviewed Mark Brickey on Episode 11.
  • Put out Episode 12 with the help of Simon.

 Heather Sakai

 Jeff Finley

  • Prepping vendor/gallery layouts and logistics for WMC
  • Keeping team morale high as we get closer to the fest date
  • Getting people hyped for the fest, less than a month away
  • Designing new posters, flyers and postcards to go out.
  • Finishing album artwork/layout for Signals Midwest’s new record
  • Helmet designs for Lincoln Electric
  • Playing some shows with Campfire Conspiracy, getting ready for our WMC Fest show August 18
  • Starting a new personal blog at makermistaker.com
  • Writing upcoming  tutorial about coming up with an occult logo design

 Kim Finley

  • Arsenal customer service
  • Bookkeeping
  • Payroll
  • Proofreading GoMediaZine posts and email campaigns
  • Shipping out WMC Merch and rewards to Kickstarter backers
  • Finished writing zine post which compared QuickBooks to FreshBooks

 Lauren Prebel

  • We are thrilled to welcome Sandra Vilevac as the newest member of the Kelley Green Web team! She will be starting August 1 and we are greatly looking forward to her contributions to both KGW and the GO Media Account Services department!
  • We attended the Greater Cleveland Partnership Annual Meeting which featured some notable speakers and inspiring videos. There are so many amazing things happening in our city and we can’t wait to see how it all evolves!
  • Go Media is collaborating with COSE as a creative partner for the NEOSA CIO Symposium in September – a regional event that brings CIOs together under one roof for an insightful forum to discuss critical business IT topics.

 Sarah Traxler

  • Managing our ongoing client & team interactions (client meetings, internal reviews, new project set up, monitoring overall project progress / ensuring deadlines are met)
  • Prep & planning for the following new projects: including
    • Branding & Web Design for Ditka Dash
    • Branding & Web Design for Law Firm Ghost Writer
    • Print Design for COSE’s NEOSA CIA Symposium
    • Branding for Fly Nation
    • Branding for Athlete Originals
    • Print Design for F.C Sturtevant
    • Web Design for FMC

 Simon Birky Hartmann

gma-teasing-july-2013

  • We’re putting a tremendous effort into the Arsenal v3,  as we want it to be amazing and chase down the last bugs
  • We’ve brainstormed a bunch of cool ideas for the launch plans for Bill Beachy’s upcoming book, Drawn to Business
  • And a bunch of miscellaneous things including:
    • Some WMC Fest IV and Arsenal cross promotions and contest(s) (more to come)
    • Some WMC IV art
    • Some analysis following our survey
    • A lot of customer support

 Wilson Revehl

  • Putting the final touches on a new Motivideos site!
  • Putting the final touches on a new Japonesque site.  It will be rolled out in phases throughout the rest of the year.
  • Kicked off a new brand and website development for Law Firm Ghost Writer, one of the leading Law Firm Marketing companies.
  • Finally rounded a corner on the new Arsenal. We expect to launch within the next month or two!
  • Wrote a new Zine article which debuts this week! It is a two part series called “Why a Custom Website is so Expensive”.
  • My usual Project Management, Account Services & System Administration work that keeps us on track and online.

Bill William Beachy

  • Managing the Storefront Renovation – looking good!
  • Drawn to Business – We’re Getting Close!
  • Dirty Energy packaging revisions
  • Internal reports including the Go Media Monthly Report
  • Working on financing and compensation models for the sales team
  • Sales

kyleKyle Saxton, Intern

  • Created concept sketches for a new packaging design – Dirty Energy. Presented sketches to client, still waiting on feedback
  • Content population for the NEOMFA website.
  • Continued on creating two marketing materials for the WMC Fest. These booklets will promote MUE and the Go Media Zine!
  • Created two banner design concepts for the new Go Media windows. Mocked them up in Photoshop to get a better idea of what the designs would look like in real life
  • Japonesque website content population and creation. Generated roughly 20-40 images that will be used on the new site
  • Illustrated the Drawn to Business pt 4/5 for Bill Beachy’s GoMediazine post.
  • Created the header art for Drawn to Business pt 4/5 for the Zine post
  • Partnered with Carly and created Icons for Bills new book Drawn to Business (Page introduction icons and index icons)
  • Made two clothing brand concepts for Athlete Originals. Client – professional running back for the New England Patriots LeGarrette Blount.
  • General Arsenal projects and mockup everything templates
  • Talking with Bill about general design questions and entrepreneurial discussions. Discovering new eating spots around Cleveland during our lunch breaks, enjoying work at Nano Brew Cleveland and having fun around the office with the whole Go Media team

nateNathaniel Scramling, Intern

  • Designed the box and banner templates for several of the Arsenal‘s new products.
  • Touching up of general info for content on Japonesque’s website.
  • Concept sketches for Dirty Energy icons promoting product flavors.
  • Created templates for use on Mockupeverything.com
  • Teaming up with the interns in formulating the new designs for the building’s front windows
  • Getting personal instruction from Mr. Beachy on how to create a personal logo and typeface for my own brand.
  • Management of the Arsenal‘s products.
  • Explored a bit of Cleveland with the other interns; found a new great lunch spot at The Cleveland Pickle (their mascot scares me).
  • Schoolwork. Lots and LOTS of schoolwork.

 _______________________________________

That’s it for now from us at Go Media. Until we meet again:

  1. Don’t forget to purchase your tickets to this year’s Weapons of Mass Creation Fest, running August 16 through 18.
  2. Sign up to be notified when Bill Beachy’s book, Drawn to Business: How to build a thriving graphic & web design agency, is out.
  3. Keep up to date with Go Media on
    Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram
  4. Don’t miss a minute of Go Media’s happenings!  Subscribe to our GoMediaZine newsletter!

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Design Tools I Can’t Live Without

Tools You Can Use

We asked our favorite designers…what design tools can’t you live without?

I’m a Brazilian graphic and web designer based in San Francisco, California. Currently working for Google, I am also the founder of Abduzeedo,
Fábio Sasso is a Brazilian graphic and web designer based in San Francisco, California. Currently working for Google, he is also the founder of Abduzeedo.

Fábio Sasso:
My Macbook Pro 15 Retina, Moleskine & More

For me, I would say that the most important things are my little Moleskine notepad with a 5.6mm mechanical pencil, my Macbook Pro 15 Retina laptop with headphones and my Nexus 4 phone so I can connect to the Internet. I think with those I can work from anywhere.

Partner at Go Media and founder of Weapons of Mass Creation Fest
Jeff Finley is a partner and design at Go Media and founder of Weapons of Mass Creation Fest

Jeff Finley:
Omnifocus, TeuxDeux, Lift App, VSCO CAM, Instacast & More

Omnifocus – I’ve been using it for two weeks, and it’s officially integrated into my life. It’s the ultimate GTD (Getting Things Done) app. It’s for Mac and iOS only. I love it because any thought or task that enters my mind goes right into the “inbox” which I can review and sort later. All of my todos for my work and life are in Omnifocus inside projects and contexts. At any time I can focus on only things at “work” or “designing” or check out all the things I need to do for my band, WMC fest, home improvement, chores, etc. My life is definitely less stressful knowing any time something comes my way I can put it into Omnifocus and forget about it until it matters. It’s a little on the expensive side, but if you’re into GTD, this is probably the king of GTD apps.

TeuxDeux –  Super simple and well designed todo app. I used this a lot before I integrated Omnifocus into my routine. I like how it carries over todos you didn’t complete for other days and has such a slick and intuitive user interface. Designers would love this. It costs a small monthly fee but it’s worth it.

Lift App – For building habits. A super simple way of staying committed to habits you are trying to start, keep, or quit. Beautiful interface on smartphones and the web. I use this daily to keep track of my morning routines, exercise habits, or other things I want to remember to do daily. But I use this for personal development habits only. You don’t use this to put your todos into. But things like “drink more water” or “cold shower.”  When you do a habit for the day, check it off and move on. It inspires you to keep going by offering encouragement for chaining together multiple days of checking in. It even has a social side where your friends give you “props” for your actions. The social aspect with the dead simple UX make this actually FUN and rewarding to start new habits. It’s  helped me start a morning ritual that has gotten me out of bed 2 hours before I have to!

VSCO CAM: Amazing photo app for iOS. Ever wonder how people get such amazing looking photos from their iPhones? This is how. The best camera app I’ve used and you can send photos directly into Instagram from the app and its filters are better.

Instacast: To listen to all my fav design related podcasts like Adventures in Design and the Go Media podcast of course!  Available on iOS. Not exactly design related, but this is a tool I couldn’t live without!

Others I like: Buffer App, Spotify, Day One for journaling, Evernote, Pocket, Feedly.

Designer at 37signals focused on making good things for good people.
Mig Reyes is a designer at 37signals focused on making good things for good people.

Mig Reyes:
Moom by Many Tricks

Moom: I’m OCD about the software that lives inside of my MacBook Air. So OCD, that I use MooM to make sure all of my application windows are perfectly centered and sized on my screen.

Alex Cornell is a San Francisco-based Designer. A graduate of Duke University, Alex cofounded Firespotter Labs in 2010 and has designed and launched Nosh, Jotly, NoshList and ÜberConference.
Alex Cornell is a San Francisco-based designer. A graduate of Duke University, Alex co-founded Firespotter Labs in 2010 and has designed and launched Nosh, Jotly, NoshList and ÜberConference.

Alex Cornell:
Sketch

My favorite tool these days is Sketch. It’s a vector-based graphics program that is basically Photoshop without all the heft and unnecessary functionality. Perfect for UI/UX designers building apps fast. Not only is it easy to use, it makes exporting for development a lot faster, with built-in tools to export assets and log CSS styling.

Aaron Sechrist is OKPANTS (one word). He has been designing and illustrating for apparel, packaging, branding, broadcast and other projects for clients and agencies since 2002 after graduating from Cleveland Institute of Art.
Aaron Sechrist is OKPANTS. He has been designing and illustrating for apparel, packaging, branding, broadcast and other projects for clients and agencies since 2002 after graduating from Cleveland Institute of Art.

Aaron Sechrist:
Pencil and Paper

The space-age tool I lean on the most and can’t live without is a suite of products conceived by a maverick start-up from parts unknown called “a Faber-Castell HB pencil & 8.5 x 11 text stock paper”. As far away as I might allow myself to get sucked into the vortex of digital technology, I can always trust my Flintstonian pre-wacom technology to ground my ideas and get me back to the proper starting block. I love sketch books and do my best to keep filling them up, but I love the feel and tooth of standard old-fashioned printer paper. I thank the stars for my MacBook and Adobe illustrator, and I love keeping up with the latest and greatest digital stuff, but the ideas don’t “happen” in there. They can’t. Thumbnailing and sketching is the earliest and purest iteration of my ideas. As long as I keep that perspective, things get made, and made the right way.

Illustrator and Go Media extended family member
Steve Knerem is an Illustrator and Go Media extended family member

Steve Knerem:
WACOM Intuos 5, etc.

When hand drawing work, I use copy paper for sketches, 100# Bristol paper for final art, rubber eraser, Bic#2  .07 pencil, tuff stuff eraser stick, Micron pens and a Drum scanner at Fed Ex Office to scan in final art.  These tools have become part of my system; I have felt comfortable with this system over the past 5+ years and use it to get the final results. I am at the point if I don’t have these specific items I’M LOST!

When drawing vectors , I use WACOM Intuos 5 using Illustrator and Photoshop. When drawing vectors I draw my image on paper, then scan it into Photoshop, then throw it into Illustrator. I am so used to drawing by hand that I need to see my own line art before I can create it into a vector image. This way, I know I am getting results closest to my hand drawn style.

Michael Flarup is a designer based out of cosy Copenhagen, Denmark.
Michael Flarup is a designer based out of cosy Copenhagen, Denmark.

Michael Flarup
Wacom Cintiq 22HD, Logitech Mouse, Mac, Dropbox & More

Wacom Cintiq 22HD: I use this to sketch out and brush up things in Photoshop. Having the ability to draw directly on the screen really merges the physicality of drawing with the benefits of digital design. I use this both in the initial phases of playing with concepts and sometimes in the final stages of icon design when I work with lighting and color.

My Logitech G9x mouse: Most of my day is used with a hand on a mouse, both during work and play. I’ve been using the G9 mouse from Logitech for the past 6 years, and I must have gone through at least a couple of them. Initially build for gaming, they offer great precision, a nice fit and the ability to load up weights to get the exact surface resistance you want.

My Macs: I realize that it might be redundant to mention this, as my Macs aren’t a questions of favorability but rather a necessity for my work. I interchangeably use my Mac Pro setup at home and my Macbook Pro Retina when I’m working remotely. I guess they do fit the bill of tools that I can’t live without.

Dropbox: Working on multiple machines, often changing workstations a couple of times a day, Dropbox has become my go-to service for keeping my files synced up. Working with large PSD files and making sure that I always have access to the most current iteration of a project is a large part of the challenges a designer faces. Dropbox helps me solve this in an elegant way.

Mail Act-on and Inbox Zero: As a business owner, a substantial amount of my time is spent getting back to people. As such, making sure that I’m on top of my inbox easily becomes a focal point of my workday. The plugin Mail Act-on helps me direct the flow of my incoming messages and helps me exercise my email Kung-Fu so I have to spend less time in Mail.app and more time in Photoshop.

President of Go Media
President of Go Media, Designer

William Beachy:
Pencil and iPad Sketching Tools

A pencil: while it may not be cool, new or innovative, it’s worth mentioning in this world of computers, tablets and Wacoms. The pencil and paper is STILL the fastest way to communicate an idea visually. Not enough designers use it. As I enter my 16th professional year as a graphic designer, I am sketching more now than ever.”

Also, iPad sketching tools – Layers, Bamboo and Paper are all great tools for quickly sketching ideas during client meetings.

Dan resides in Brooklyn and currently leads a team of designers and animators as Creative Director at Tribeca Enterprises which includes Tribeca Film Festival & Tribeca Film.
Dan Dickson resides in Brooklyn and currently leads a team of designers and animators as Creative Director at Tribeca Enterprises which includes Tribeca Film Festival & Tribeca Film.

Dan Dickson
Classic Sport Rollerball Pen, Wacom Tablet & More

I use a Classic Sport Rollerball Pen when taking notes or sketching or looking stylish.

I also use Dropbox, digital storage which keeps my pockets light and my Wacom Tablet.

And Bienfang Marker paper – I think i’m the only one who still uses these pads!

Len Peralta draws monsters, robots, zombies and so much more. He has illustrated several books including “There’s A Zombie In My Treehouse” by John “Widgett” Robinson and Ken Plume, “Silly Rhymes For Belligerent Children” written by MST3K/Cinematic Titanic’s Trace Beaulieu and “Look” by Robert Bowling. He has also worked on projects for Discovery Channel, MythBusters and Steve Jackson Games.
Len Peralta draws monsters, robots, zombies and so much more. He has illustrated several books including “There’s A Zombie In My Treehouse” by John “Widgett” Robinson and Ken Plume, “Silly Rhymes For Belligerent Children” written by MST3K/Cinematic Titanic’s Trace Beaulieu and “Look” by Robert Bowling. He has also worked on projects for Discovery Channel, MythBusters and Steve Jackson Games.

Len Peralta:
Brush Packs

Deviant Art Brush Pack: I was made aware of this fantastic brush pack  by artist Megan Lara, and it has become my go-to staple pack for pretty much all my design projects. These are great brushes that actually behave the way you expect and want them to. They have become an invaluable tool in my arsenal. Plus, it’s free!”

I bought the VFX WorkShops Digital Painting Brush Pack  on a whim just to try them out, and they have become an everyday tool I use to build a lot of my environmental textures. Great brushes with a lot of versatility and depth and they can really help bring your digital work to life.

_________________________

What are your favorite design tools?  Please comment below!

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Go Media Podcast – Episode 12: An Interview With Brandon Rike

In this episode, we sit down with WMC Fest Speaker Brandon Rike. We talk to him about his experience in designing music apparel and how he become one of the top designers in the field while betraying the institution. We also sit down with Simon to talk about the current status of the Arsenal and its design products.

Listen to the Podcast

[powerpress]

[iframe width=”100%” height=”166″ scrolling=”no” frameborder=”no” src=”https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F102255123&auto_play=false&show_artwork=true&color=ff7700″]

Show Notes

Sponsor of this Episode

This episode has been brought to you by Revision Path. Revision Path is a showcase of the world’s black graphic designers, web designers, and web developers. Through interviews, feature stories, and community participation, Revision Path will advance the interests of black digital creatives by giving them a platform to share knowledge, discuss issues, and meet their peers for networking and collaboration opportunities.

Cover art for this episode was also created using Fractal Space textures. You can find this vector pack and more at arsenal.gomedia.us

New from the Arsenal

Links

An Interview With Maurice Cherry From Revision Path and 3eighteen Media

hd_37efd6ab5d3257c8a4be8ee9f4366dce[1]

Go Media: Can you tell us a little bit about yourself, your background and why you started Revision Path?

Maurice Cherry: I’m Maurice Cherry, and I’m the creative principal at 3eighteen media , a one-man web studio in Atlanta, GA. I’m a Morehouse College alumnus, and I’m best known for founding the Black Weblog Awards in 2005. Along with 3eighteen media, I’m also the founder/editor of Revision Path.

Go Media: You showcase black graphic designers, web designers and web developers. How do you find this talent and what important characteristics do you look for when highlighting these individuals?

Maurice Cherry: Finding designers and developers to interview for Revision Path started with looking at my professional network. From there, it’s been pretty easy uncovering talent just through word of mouth or exploring profiles on LinkedIn. I’m looking for everyone from students to seasoned professionals who have an interest in talking about their craft. I’ve already reached out to over 100 people and I’ve got a list of over 200 I’m slowly working my way through.

Go Media: What do you want people to feel, learn or take away when they visit Revision Path?

Maurice Cherry: I want people to see that there is a ton of talent out there that you might not see featured on popular design websites or on speaker panels for conferences. I know that talking about diversity in tech is always a touchy subject, but I wanted to do so in a way that wasn’t positioned as some sort of we/they dichotomy. And believe me, I’ve heard the excuses when it comes to outreach! “It’s a pain the rear.” “It’s too much work.” “It takes a lot of effort.” I haven’t found that to be the case at all unless my melanin granted me special research powers.

I want people to look at Revision Path as a platform to showcase these black creatives, learn who they are, and reach out to them to open doors to more opportunities! We all succeed when there are diverse voices and viewpoints at the table, and I really believe that Revision Path can help make that happen.

Go Media: If someone is interested in being featured in Revision Path, how might they do so?

Maurice Cherry: Contact me! There’s a contact form on the website and on http://facebook.com/revisionpath, and folks can reach out to us on Twitter @revisionpath. Revision Path isn’t just interviews either — I have job postings from time to time and people are more than welcome to submit articles that would be good for the site’s audience.

Go Media: Is there anything else you want people to know about yourself or your site?

Maurice Cherry: Right now, I’m doing a reader survey, and one lucky respondent will win a $50 Amazon.com gift card!

Credits

Hosts: Jeff Finley and Bill Beachy
Producer: Bryan Garvin
Recorded at: Go Media

Sponsorship Opportunities

Interested in sponsoring the Go Media podcast, either episodically or exclusively? Well, hit us up at [email protected] if you are interested in advertising your business. Or, take part in our blind auction.

What Do You Think?

We want to hear what you think about the latest episode of our podcast and what topics you would like to see covered in upcoming episodes. Comment below with your suggestions.

Ready for More?

Keep learning and listening to more Go Media podcasts!

A new Arsenal release: the Fractal Space texture pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html

A new Arsenal release: the Fractal Space texture pack

The texture pack

Hello all! Simon here today to introduce you our latest Arsenal release, the Fractal Space texture pack.

Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html

It’s a set of 20 textures, created by the man behind our amazing microscopic fingerprints texture pack, Dustin Schmieding (Valleys in the Vinyl, Lost and Taken, etc.). The set is quite unique. It’s not yet another set of watercolor, paper, and grunge elements mixed together. It’s a digitally generated, strange space filled what seems to be a gaseous cloud, or something.

Let’s have a closer look

The pack includes 15 black and white textures, as well as 5 bonus color textures, all in high resolution (4000 x 2800 pixels).

Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html

I like these because they allow me to add a subtle, eerie, and digital mood to my designs. Or something a bit less subtle too. Just see below, Dustin wrote a few quick guides to give you ideas on how to use them. The microphone’s all his!
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Foreword

Red Giant’s Trapcode Mir plugin for After Effects is a fantastic asset for motion and still-image artists alike. Using a basic mesh, you can manipulate dozens of properties in a three-dimensional space to create incredibly original and beautiful shapes. Today we will be looking at a set of 20 Fractal Space textures I created using this plugin, now available for purchase at the Go Media Arsenal.

In this tutorial, we are going to showcase this texture set in three different ways. A primary strength of this set is the inclusion of bright light mixed with gradations of grayscale color. The seemingly simple textures have another major perk that most traditional textures don’t possess, you can invert the image and have an equally useful texture. This method is useful when using certain blending modes in Photoshop, particularly the more subtle ones like Multiply, Screen, and Lighten.

Example One – Apply Antique Haze to your Photos

Let’s start by using only two steps to add haze and age to a photo. Here we have a simple photo of an industrial brick building.

GoMedia-FractalSpace-PhotoExample-01-Before

We will be using Fractal Space Texture #2 to add our antique haze aesthetic.

Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html

Place the texture on top of your photograph, and invert the texture (CTRL/CMD + I). Note: The texture layer must be rasterized before you can invert it, unless you choose to use an adjustment layer.

Set the texture layer’s blending mode to Screen. That’s it, you’re done!

GoMedia-FractalSpace-PhotoExample-01-After

GoMedia-FractalSpace-PhotoExample-01-BeforeAfter

Example Two – Give a Traditional Texture new highlight/flare

The next use of these fractals we’ll examine is adding dynamic flare and highlight to some traditional textures. We can simulate depth and bring new life to stagnant traditional textures. The example we’ll use here is a rusted and peeling metal texture.

GoMedia-FractalSpace-TextureExample-Original

We will be using Fractal Space texture #8 to add our effect.

Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html

Just as we did with the first example, we will place the fractal texture on top of the base photo layer, and invert it. This time I also rotated the fractal 180 degrees. Once again, set the fractal layer’s blending mode to Screen, and leave the layer’s opacity at 100%. You are encouraged to experiment with other blending modes and opacity levels, but for our purposes here, we are using the Screen blending mode.

I like the result, but want to give it a little bit more punch. By adding a Curves adjustment layer and doing some subtle tweaking, I gave the colors some more vibrancy and the whole image some more life. Note: you could also use a hue/saturation adjustment layer for similar results.

GoMedia-FractalSpace-TextureExample-Final

GoMedia-FractalSpace-TextureExample-BeforeAfter

Example Three – Bokeh with Attitude

Bokeh photos are well-trodden and though they are useful, can sometimes become tedious. Well how can we instantly give a bokeh photo an injection of edge and attitude? Here’s how we do that.

We start with a pretty standard, unassuming bokeh photograph of some Christmas lights.

GoMedia-FractalSpace-BokehExample-Original

To add our attitude, we will use the purple Fractal texture, number 19.

Fractal Space Texture Pack - http://arsenal.gomedia.us/fractal-space-texture-pack.html

Now just place the Fractal texture on top of your bokeh photo, and apply the blending mode Vivid Light.

GoMedia-FractalSpace-BokehExample

GoMedia-FractalSpace-Bokeh-BeforeAfter

That’s it! You’ll see that the Fractal texture adds some rough scratch-like effects to the bokeh, as well as some bold color and implied motion.

While these are just three methods of applying these Fractal textures, they are by no means the only methods. The diverse depth and flowing aesthetic can work well for text masking, blurred background elements, or as standalone images. This set is a refreshing, versatile, and dynamic addition to your digital resource library, not to mention tons of fun to use. Get out there and experiment!
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Conclusion

As Dustin said, the possibilities are very vast. You know you should go and pick up these up while they’re hot. Or wait until they cool off a bit, don’t burn yourself. And don’t forget to share your results in the Go Media’s Flickr pool and Pinterest gallery.

Until next time, cheers!

How the Design Workflow is Changing

Once upon a time, there was a method of design that involved plenty of time for brainstorming and upfront big picture planning. Designers could meet with all interested parties, puzzle over design challenges, and play with problems until they’d found a (theoretical) solution.

But that approach to design workflow has been largely relegated to the history books—some would say, for the betterment of all. As the development world has embraced the Agile process with systems like scrums and big data analytics, designers find themselves under increasing pressure to iterate quickly, rather than spending lots of time planning for project demands that are highly likely to change just a week or even a day after the plan is finally set. This sounds to many experienced designers like it’s anathema to the creative process, and it can be, if we try to adapt Agile development practices wholesale, without tweaking them to fit the design workflow or mentality.

Conversely, the many designers who do make Agile their own find it can actually be a boon for creativity, forcing them out of productivity-deadening perfectionism and keeping them on their toes as they try to meet changing constraints. How are these designers embracing the more dynamic Agile approach to workflow while still holding strong to the more static elements of the design process that keep them surefooted and on solid ground? Let’s take a look at a few key approaches from beginning to end.

1. Start and End With the Client

style-tiles

We’re all familiar with those nightmare clients who call five times a day. We all also know the frustration of the client who says, “I don’t know” and “Sure,” to everything, only to decide upon seeing the finished product that it’s, “Not quite right.” While there’s no catch all solution for these kinds of difficulties, there’s a lot that can be done when you adopt the agile mentality of taking the client on almost as a team member. That means giving them a constant stream of deliverables, even if it’s something small, and communicating feedback to the rest of the team during your daily or weekly stand up meetings so you can adjust accordingly. Clients can also be helpful in maintaining that on-brand feel, as well as in testing any prototypes or clarifying just what the demands of the job entail as they see it all come together.

To do this, you may want to assign a liaison between you and the client to handle the bulk of customer feedback, so you can focus on design work. It’s also important to shift away both from static, labor intensive PSD mockups of pages that you may have to radically change or decide not to make at all, as well as from mood boards, which are often too vague to be of any help. Instead, try using a tool like Style Tiles, which will enable you to produce the smaller deliverables like fonts, colors and page elements, that will form the basis of your site design, rather than focusing on that static bigger picture. Style tiles can be used throughout the process, from visual brainstorms to the many adjustments that need to be made throughout every iteration. What’s more, you can use style tiles to combine elements across each tile, so you can constantly adjust and merge looks.

2. Do the Heavy Lifting Before a Project “Begins”

If you hadn’t guessed it already, there’s just no time in the Agile design process to spend a good 15 hours producing a PSD mockup, especially if it doesn’t lead to a workable product in the end (and it often doesn’t). In contrast, designing extensive style guides during the brainstorming process can provide the best kind of jumping off point. In saying this, I’m not referring to those basic, brand style guides, but instead to coded style guides that are devoted to page elements, like buttons, typography, headers and so forth. Once coded, these page elements not only give the client a much better sense of the product, but they’re also a lot easier to implement when the designer does begin work on the “true” product, i.e. landing pages. A coded style guide will allow you to easily change your design as you go, without having those heart stopping, “This isn’t what I asked for” moments at the end of a project. In essence, this means shifting from top down to bottom up design.

style-guide

3. Iterate Frequently, But Don’t Lose Sight of the Big Picture

Ready. Set. Iterate! Two of the most commonly implemented and famous elements of Agile are iterations and sprint planning. During each iteration, design teams limit themselves to achieving a set of achievable goals, which they’ll then pursue with singular intensity. This folds in nicely with the concept of constantly delivering products to the client, as each iteration should produce something to present, no matter how unpolished.

A common (and well-justified) complaint amongst designers about the iterative process is that it becomes hyper-localized, so that the big picture becomes murky. This is one area where designers can really benefit from breaking a little bit away from the classic Agile development process with design spikes. When a design spike is called, all work on anything that would be dependent on the spike ceases, and one designer is elevated to “owner” to stand alongside the product owner. New team members can be brought on if their perspective would be useful, but the most important part of the idea is that it ceases all action until this bigger issue or viewpoint is fixed or achieved.

Another effective strategy is to adopt at least the philosophy behind the development process continuous integration, in which developers constantly integrate their work, rather than waiting until the product is done to fix a huge backlog of unforeseen bugs. Similarly, designers can keep that bigger picture in mind by constantly integrating their work across the design team, and testing elements as they go.

4. Evaluate Your Efforts

The Agile design process can be highly effective, but only if you’ve got your strategies done. Implemented the wrong way, Agile can be more distracting and anxiety-inducing than anything else, leading to far lower productivity rates than the classic Waterfall method. At the end of a project, or perhaps even at the end of every iteration, take the time to evaluate how your implementation of Agile is going, and whether or not any tweaks need to be made. Of course, you’ll also need to evaluate your design efforts, so that you can properly adjust your backlog and add the most appropriate new tasks into the next iteration.

Final Thoughts

There’s no getting around it: Agile is taking the development world by storm. Whether that makes your little designer heart jump for joy or it makes your blood boil, it’s a reality we all have to face if we’re going to continue working hand in hand with developers. The best thing we can do is embrace these changes and make them work for what designers actually do. And who knows? You might just find yourself creatively unlocked as you go.

Read this Book: Design Currency

Design Currency by Jenn and Ken Visocky O’Grady, A Book Review

Husband and wife team Jenn and Ken Visocky O’Grady have done it again.  These successful university professors, Jenn a Professor at Cleveland State University and Ken an Associate Professor at Kent State University, have quite a lot under their belt. Co-founders of creative think tank Enspace and co-authors of The Information Design Handbook and A Designer’s Research Manual, the Visocky O’Grady duo has come together once again to write Design Currency.

Design currency, their third creation, is dedicated to designers everywhere pushing the boundaries of design. It aims to help designers understand, define and promote the value of their design work.  The Visocky O’Grady’s promise to teach the reader to leverage traditional design skills in new ways, measure the value that their design work brings to a project, articulate that value so that they can position themselves as a partner in the development process, charge what they’re worth and prevent their job from getting crowd-sourced or outsourced and generate business value by better identifying audience needs.

Design Currency is now available on Pearson Higher Ed in paperback, at $27.99, or digitally at $22.39.

roi

The Scoop

Jenn and Ken Visocky O’Grady skip what could be a never ending discussion about design aesthetics and cut straight to the chase.  How can designers best measure the value of their design in terms of business metrics?

Design Currency is filled with hardy advice, giving concrete objectives for designers looking to turn skills into outcomes, insights into actions, ideas into processes.  The authors show the reader, through very specific and thoughtful discussion, how to see their design work through new eyes.

Quick tips and short exercises fill Design Currency‘s 229 pages, engaging and challenging the reader with food for thought.  Colorful photography, charts and graphs from the Visocky O’Grady’s and work from contributors like WMC Fest favorite Brian Andrew Jaskinski illustrate their points.

The empowerment provided by the Visocky O’Grady’s also gives the reader the self-assurance to both qualify and quantify their aesthetic decisions, thus making them an expert not only in the design realm but as a business professional as well.

If you have the time to take a bite out of this thorough handbook, you’ll be on your way to more confidently promoting your work to your client, objectively and aesthetically.

Buy this Book |

Would you like a free copy of Design Currency? Subscribe to our mailing list AND leave a comment below!  We’ll choose four winners at random, and those four will be sent a paperback copy of the book! Good Luck!

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Inspiration Now! 11 Ideas from Our Favorite Designers

Writer’s block? Stuck in a rut? Creatively challenged?

We’ve all been there, staring at the screen: cursor blinking, artboard sadly stark white, pencil sharpened and nowhere to go.  Looking around you want so badly for inspiration to jump off the screen and bite you.  Sometimes, just sometimes it does – but more often than not, you have to go looking for it.  Even our favorite designers, on those dark and desperate moments, have to dig deep and think out-of-the-box to seek inspiration everywhere – and today they’re here to share with us some places you might find it, too.

James White is a visual artist, designer and speaker living in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. He makes posters and all kinds of cool stuff.
James White is a visual artist, designer and speaker living in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. He makes posters and all kinds of cool stuff.

James White: “I find inspiration by researching stuff from my childhood. Being a child of the 80s, I watch a lot of cartoons and movies from that era, as well as look at a lot of comics, posters, stickers, patches etc. The 80’s aesthetic holds a special place in my heart and always brings me back to being that 7 year old playing with GI Joes in the back yard.”

Brandon Rike designs shirt graphics for bands, as well as logos, posters, low-key album art. He makes letters look good.
Brandon Rike designs shirt graphics for bands, as well as logos, posters, low-key album art. He makes letters look good.

Brandon Rike: “I’ve always found that looking at other designers and artists’ work often proved to be counter-productive. Either it becomes a complete time-suck for your day, or conjures up feelings of envy or insecurity. I try my best to avoid those design inspiration sites and publications the best I can. Instead, I’ve always been a bit more inspired, albeit indirectly, by the spaces in which designers and artists work. I’ve found myself more inspired about seeing the area in which other people feel creative in. A quick search for “artist studios” or “workroom” often leaves me excited to create, as well as excited to someday create my “dream studio” – the utopian space were the ideas flow effortlessly.

I’ve found more inspiration in a blank canvas than a collection of suggestions. Your ideas exist inside of you, and while seeing others work may spark a new idea in you, have confidence in your own ideas – just put yourself in an open position where they can come to you. De-clutter, and leave room for creativity.”

New York City native Jon Contino has garnered considerable attention for his unique approach to design utilizing hand-drawn lettering and typographic illustration in conjunction with a modern, yet minimalistic sensibility. He works not only as a freelance illustrator, but also as Co-Founder and Creative Director of menswear brand CXXVI Clothing Company. Photo by Jonathan Mannion
New York City native Jon Contino has garnered considerable attention for his unique approach to design utilizing hand-drawn lettering and typographic illustration in conjunction with a modern, yet minimalistic sensibility. He works not only as a freelance illustrator, but also as Co-Founder and Creative Director of menswear brand CXXVI Clothing Company. Photo by Jonathan Mannion

Jon Contino: “My favorite places to find inspiration are with the people that I love around me. My wife and daughter, my parents, and my grandfather are all really inspiring people and just sitting and talking with them or watching them do their thing is something that really gets my mind going. The traditional forms of inspiration are great, but there’s nothing like really listening to someone’s opinion that you trust about the world around you.”

Illustrator, Educator and Maker of Things living and loving in Portland, Oregon
Kate Bingaman-Burt is an illustrator, educator and maker of things living and loving in Portland, Oregon

Kate Bingaman-Burt: “One interesting place I look to find inspiration is a little shop right down my street called SMUT (stands for So. Many. Unique. Treasures) It’s filled with a really excellent selection of used vinyl (with a listening station) and lots of good, organized piles of odd items (books, photos, magazines, movie posters etc). It is organized chaos at its finest and only 30 seconds from my house.”

Adam Garcia is creative director, designer and illustrator who runs The Pressure, a creative studio in Portland, Oregon
Adam Garcia is creative director, designer and illustrator who runs The Pressure, a creative studio in Portland, Oregon.

Adam Garcia: “I’d say that my new place to find inspiration is these improv classes I’ve been taking. Opened my mind in ways I couldn’t have imagined, and inspired me in ways I didn’t know possible.”

Rachael Novak is a graphic designer from Cleveland who does mixed media, digital illustration and print design. She is a Line Designer at American Greetings. Photo credit: Justyna Walker
Rachael Novak is a graphic designer from Cleveland who does mixed media, digital illustration and print design. She is a Line Designer at American Greetings. Photo credit: Justyna Walker

Rachael Novak: “I find most of my inspiration actually comes from bars. I find that having casual conversation with friend(s) often jogs a lot of ideas and hearing different perspectives helps solve problems when I get stuck, too. And doing it all over a few beers isn’t too shabby, either!”

derrick
Designer Derrick Castle owns clothing line Straw Castle.

Derrick Castle: “One of the places that I derive a lot of inspiration from is antique shops. I don’t know how “Out-of-the-Box” this is, but for me, I’ve always be inspired by vintage advertising and typography. I have several antique shops close to me that sort of take you back in time. These aren’t those old junk shops that have all your grandparents old broken down furniture and china. These shops take me back to vintage Americana… think American Pickers.

These shops have everything from old motor oil cans to vintage tobacco tins, vintage books to antique phonographs. I actually bought a 100 year old bottle of prohibition era medicinal bitters. These bitters were alcohol based and labeled medicinal in order to avoid the regulations of the Volstead Act. I love picking up items like this that have so much character and rich history, that is the pure definition of inspiration!”

Stewart Scott-Curran is an Art Director, Graphic Designer and Illustrator from Glasgow, Scotland who is currently based in Atlanta
Stewart Scott-Curran is an Art Director, Graphic Designer and Illustrator from Glasgow, Scotland who is currently based in Atlanta

Stewart Scott-Curran:  “I often get inspiration from watching my 4 year old daughter play. Young children tend not to be constrained by any preconceptions when it comes to making up games and as such their imaginations are free to run riot and create anything they like whether it makes sense in the real world or not. We tend to lose this as adults and I think we could all do well to look at things from a child’s point of view from time to time.”

Lisa Congdon is a fine artist and illustrator from San Francisco. Her vast catalog of work includes illustrations for Chronicle Books, Harper Collins Publishing, and Simon and Schuster, among others. See her speak at WMC Fest this year.
Lisa Congdon is a fine artist and illustrator from San Francisco. Her vast catalog of work includes illustrations for Chronicle Books, Harper Collins Publishing, and Simon and Schuster, among others. See her speak at WMC Fest this year.

Lisa Congdon: “I am an avid traveler, and it’s where I find most of my inspiration. Every year I like to go to a different country or city in the US and take tons of photographs that I then use to inspire my work for the next twelve months.”

Interactive designer, music aficionado, lover of things DIY, and a part-time dreamer.
Interactive designer, music aficionado, lover of things DIY, and a part-time dreamer.

Charlotte Tang: “As an interactive designer, I love creating aesthetically pleasing user-centric designs that cater to a specific target audience’s needs, behaviours, and habits. I find inspiration in exploring different personas, their actions and how they would interact with something that is essentially hand-crafted for them. I’ve always enjoyed creating personalized gifts and watching for that reaction; waiting for that click that resonates with the person and makes their day. I am grateful that my job allows me to fundamentally create these “personalized experiences” that is intuitive for the user.”

Sean McCabe has a passion for hand lettering and typography.
Sean McCabe has a passion for hand lettering and typography.

Sean McCabe: “The good ideas don’t come when you expect them. This means it’s important to always be ready to capture those ideas when they hit. I have a few categories in my to-do list app specifically for this purpose, so when inspiration strikes—maybe at a stop light or standing in line—I have an immediate place to chronicle the thought.”

“To be inspired, you have to create space for your mind to wander and relax. Sometimes the most productive thing you can do is leave the office and go for a walk, or read a book. I get some of my best ideas in the shower. Whenever I get stuck on a project, I never force anything. In fact, I’ll carve out a time in my day to lay on the couch and stare at the ceiling. I suppose it’s not unlike meditating, though for me I simply just think. I give my mind the free reign to sit and process over all of its thoughts. Usually within a short time, I have that spark I need.”

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From where do you seek inspiration? Tell us in the comments section below. We’ll share your ideas on our Facebook page!

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The Responsive Pricing System

Hi Go Media faithful!  Bill here! I’m back to deliver another teaser article from my book, Drawn to Business.  One of the most common questions I get from young designers who are either freelancing or starting a firm is “What should I charge for my design services?” Today we’ll cover one aspect of the Go Media pricing model. I like to call it the Responsive Pricing System.

The Responsive Pricing System

When I started Go Media, it was just me. I had a set list of prices I wanted to charge, but I was frequently desperate for money. When times got lean, I dropped my prices to secure enough work to pay my rent. In effect, I had a responsive pricing system. When I was slow, my rates went down. When I was busy, they went up.

As Go Media grew and I had other members in the company selling with me, our pricing became very rigid. Under any circumstances, we charged exactly XX dollars an hour.

Here’s why we learned that being extremely rigid on your pricing can be a problem:

If your pricing is too low, you’ll soon find yourself swamped. Despite being swamped, your pricing remains low, which means the work piles up. When the work is piled up, you start falling behind. You’re not capturing the maximum amount of profit for the time you’re working. The quality of your work suffers and clients start to leave.

If your pricing is too high, then you’ll be too slow. While you’re capturing good money for the hours your staff is working on paying projects, they’re also sitting idle some portion of each day. That’s also leaving money on the table.

What you’re shooting for is to keep your staff as busy as possible while collecting as much money as possible.  You accomplish this by having your price points respond to the current situation.

It works like this

If our staff is booked solid for:

  • 12 weeks or more, we offer no discounts and will only sell projects that are worth $5,000 or more.
  • Between 8–12 weeks then we’re willing to discount our rates by 20% and we’ll take any project worth $2,500 or more.
  • Between 4–8 weeks, we’re willing to discount our rates up to 40% and will take any project worth $1,000 or more.
  • Less than four weeks, we’re willing to discount our rates up to 50% and take any project worth $500 or more.

*Note: these are example metrics only. You will have to experiment with discount rates, minimums and time ranges that work for your particular situation.

This formalized responsive pricing system allows us to always stay busy and ensures that we’re capturing as much money as possible.

Key Points

1. First, don’t share this information with your potential clients. This is for your eyes only.

2. Always present your potential clients with your full retail rates first. Only AFTER they tell you that they cannot afford your normal rates do you start to negotiate down.

3. Ask for their budget upfront. If you know what they can afford, you’ll tailor your solution to their price.

4. Follow up. The simple act of following up with clients after you’ve sent them a proposal can frequently spark a conversation that will lead to a negotiation.

5. Be enthusiastic about the project. Sometimes, if a customer knows you really want their project badly, they’ll assume that you’ll be willing to come down on price.

6.  Keep your retail rates high enough that they will allow you enough profit margin to quickly grow your company.

7.  Keep a system in place for knowing how far out your team is booked. This is one of the fundamental metrics that drives this system.

8.  Lastly, the minimum order portion of this system does not apply to existing customers. Obviously, a current client who calls with a need, even a very small need, should be taken care of immediately.

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Want to learn more about becoming the greatest design firm you can be?  Buy Drawn to Business, a nuts and bolts strategy guide to building a thriving design firm!

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Top 100 Design & Inspiration Blogs: Go Media & Friends Favorites

Read these Blogs

Google Reader has retired, but we here at Go Media believe RSS is far from dead. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of 100 of our favorite blogs to follow, however it is you may choose to do so.  And even better, we had a little help from our friends.

Designer Adam Garcia is the owner of The Pressure, a creative studio based in Portland, Oregon.
Owner of The Pressure, a creative studio based in Portland, Oregon.

 Adam Garcia’s Favorite Blogs

Today and Tomorrow:  Advertising, art, design, fashion, music
BLDGBlogLos Angeles-based writer Geoff Manaugh provides architectural news and conjecture
The New Graphic: Graphic design goodness by Cina Associates
Banquet Hall Tumblr: Good stuff

James White is a visual artist, designer and speaker living in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Visual artist, designer and speaker living in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada.

 James White’s Favorite Blogs

Abduzeedo: Great people, great content
Jason Eisener’s Tumblr: Rad inspiration stuff

Jen Adrion and Omar Noory are the designers These Are Things. They love maps!
Designers These Are Things. They love maps! See them at WMC this year!

Jen Adrion’s Picks

The Art of Non-ConformityChris Guillebeau’s blog pairs business insights with details from his quest to visit all 192 countries
Mark’s Daily AppleI try to stay updated about health and fitness issues to counteract all of the inevitable chair-sitting that comes with this profession!

Omar Noory’s Picks

I follow a lot of Tumblrs –
mostly illustrators and funny comics including:
Filipe Andrade | Jordie Bellaire  |  Owen Davey | Mcbess (Matthieu Bessudo) |  Kali Ciesemier |  Babs Tarr | Kevin Wada |  Seo Kim | Nathan Bulmer

I’m one of three partners here at Go Media and founder of Weapons of Mass Creation Fest.
One of three partners at Go Media & founder of Weapons of Mass Creation Fest.

Jeff Finley’s Picks

SidebarThe 5 best design links, every day
Think Traffic:  Build a thriving and profitable audience for your site
Medium A better place to read and write things that matter
James Clear:  Entrepreneur, weightlifter, and travel photographer
Seth Godin: Best selling author
Nathan Barry: iPhone and software designer
ISO50: The blog of Scott Hansen
Adventures in Design: Graphic design gossip and artistic growing pains through the eyes of two poster designers
Execute Ventures: Inspiring product designers
Mule Radio: Follow this podcast
HowStuffWorks:  Explains thousands of topics
The Industry:  Brings a new voice to tech media
This American Life:  The most popular podcast in the country
Ffffound!: Find, bookmark and share your favorite images

Margot Harrington is graphic designer, blogger, and sometimes teacher. She founded her design studio Pitch Design Union in the fall of 2008 and has been captivated by all forms of making and doing ever since.
Graphic designer, blogger, and sometimes teacher. She founded her design studio Pitch Design Union in the fall of 2008.

Margot Harrington’s Picks

Kottke.org: One of the longest continuously running blogs on the web
Ann Friedman: Blog of magazine journalist and friend of Go Media
Artsy: A new way to discover art you’ll love, featuring work from leading galleries, museums, and private collections around the world.
Design Work LifeA part of Seamless Creative, a New York City-based design studio

Wilson Revehl is one of three partners at Go Media. His title is Vice President and is Go Media's web department's lead developer on custom solutions.
VP and one of three partners at Go Media.

Wilson Revehl’s Picks

Slate Magazine:  Online magazine of news, politics, and culture
Inc.:  Inc Magazine’s advice, tools, services
Salon.com:  Award-winning online news and entertainment Web site
VentureBeat:  News about tech, money and innovation
ReadWrite:  Web Technology news, reviews and analysis, etc.
Adweek:  Magazine and website that covers media news, including print, technology, advertising, branding and television
New York Times:  Breaking news, multimedia, reviews & opinion
Fool.com: Investing information and an enjoyably useful site
Harvard Business Review Magazine:  Business management magazine, blogs, case studies, articles, books, and webinars
MIT Technology Review:  Magazine about innovation

Troy DeShano is an artist and illustrator from Traverse City, Michigan known for launching the Old and New project after WMC Fest 2011.
Artist and illustrator from Traverse City, Michigan known for launching the Old and New project after WMC Fest 2011

Troy DeShano’s Picks

Peter Rollins: Writer, lecturer, storyteller, public speaker
Lisa Congdon: Artist, Illustrator and WMC speaker
Jared Erickson: Inspiration from this Atlanta Designer
The Fox is Black: A blog focused on design and inspiration 
Mollie Greene: Writer and Paper Artist

Andrea Pippins is a designer, illustrator and teacher.  Come see her at WMC Fest this year.
Designer, illustrator and teacher. Come see her at WMC Fest this year.

Andrea Pippin’s Picks

Miss Moss: Fashion, Photography, Art, Illustration, Design
Oh Joy!: Oh Joy blog covers inspiration and design by Joy Deangdeelert Cho
Park and Cube: Fashion blog by graphic designer Shini Park

Sean Dockery is an illustrator & designer raised in Cleveland, OH and currently resides in Pittsburgh, PA.
An illustrator & designer raised in Cleveland, OH and currently resides in Pittsburgh, PA. See him at WMC Fest this year!

Sean Dockery’s Picks

Austin Kleon’s Tumblr: Author of Steal Like An Artist
Conceptart.org: Sharpen your drawing skills
Matthew Woodson: A role model for his amazing line work and beautiful color palettes
Artist Mike MitchellArtist Mike Mitchell’s innovative paintings
Ted Talks: Ideas worth spreading, a great way to get through the work day and stay motivated

Kern and Burn is an online and print publication by Jessica Karle Heltzel and Tim Hoover that curates discussions, interviews and essays.
Kern and Burn is an online and print publication by Jessica Karle Heltzel and Tim Hoover that curates discussions, interviews and essays.  See them at WMC Fest this year!

Kern and Burn’s Picks

99U: Our go to source for quick reads on productivity, relevant resources and tools
The Great Discontent: Beautifully presented and written interviews with creatives and artists
A Well Traveled Woman: Gorgeously curated lifestyle and travel blog
Its Nice That: A great place to discover unique work in art and design
Fast Co Design: Features centered on the intersection of business, innovation, and design
LifeHacker:  Easy reading for tips, tricks, and best-ofs for the web/tech crowd

Freelance graphic designer specializing in the music apparel industry and WMC 2013 speaker
Freelance graphic designer specializing in the music apparel industry and WMC 2013 speaker

Brandon Rike’s Picks

Draplin Design Co: Adventures in design with Aaron Draplin
Mr Cup Blog: An inspiration blog and a shop for graphic designers who need to improve their life and creativity
RemodelistaThe authoritative sourcebook for interior design and home remodeling

Jacqui Oakley is an illustrator; she specializes in hand-lettering and portraiture .
Illustrator who specializes in hand-lettering and portraiture. Hear her speak at WMC Fest this year.

Jacqui Oakley’s Picks

50Watts: Features book covers, ephemera, weird kids’ books, features on forgotten writers, artists’ books, contemporary drawing
Dangerous Minds: A compendium of oddities, pop culture treasures, high weirdness, punk rock and politics drawn from the outer reaches of pop culture
Public Domain ReviewShowcasing the most interesting and unusual out-of-copyright works available online
Open Culture: Brings together high-quality cultural & educational media
UbuWeb: A completely independent resource website dedicated to all strains of the avant-garde, ethnopoetics, and outsider arts

Graphic Designer from Wichita Falls, TX
Graphic Designer from Wichita Falls, TX

Simeon Hendrix’s Picks

Blog Spoon Graphics:  Tons of great inspiration and tutorials into hand lettering, photoshop techniques, illustrator techniques, etc.
Field Notes: Awesome memo book company that releases limited edition custom unique memo books every season of the year.  It’s full of awesome old school vintage inspiration
Aaron Draplin/Draplin Design CompanyBrilliant graphic artist, touring speaker, outspoken, amazing

Front-end developer and designer here at Go Media.
Front-end developer and designer here at Go Media

Bryan Garvin’s Picks

CSS Tricks: A Couple of best practices for tablet-friendly design
Webdesigner Depot: Web design resources for web designers
Android Central: News, reviews, help & tips, buyer guides, forums and accessories
Smashing Magazine: Online magazine for professional web designers and developers

Project Manager at Go Media
Project Manager at Go Media

Sarah Traxler’s Picks

Good: Ideas and tools for progress
Design ObserverFeatures news and critical essays on design, urbanism, social innovation and popular culture

Designer at Go Media
Designer at Go Media

Aaron Robert’s Picks

Collate: Design Inspiration
Creative Review:  Advertising, design and visual culture
Minimalissimo:  An online editorial platform that celebrates minimalism in design
AisleOne: Graphic Design, Typography and Grid Systems

Arsenal Manager at Go Media and co-founder, partner and designer at Studio Ace of Spade
Arsenal Manager at Go Media and co-founder, partner and designer at Studio Ace of Spade

Simon Birky Hartmann’s Picks

But does it float?: Painting, photography, drawing, typography, design
Rob Sheridan’s Tumblr: Creative director for Nine Inch Nails
Signalnoise’s Inspiration Tumblr: Inspiration by our friend and amazing designer James White

Editor of the GoMediaZine & Community Manager at Go Media
Editor of the GoMediaZine & Community Manager at Go Media

Heather Sakai’s Picks

Swiss MissA design blog and studio run by Tina Roth Eisenberg
This Isn’t Happiness: Art, Photography, Design and Disappointment
You the Designer: The Graphic Design Lifestyle Blog
Web Design Tuts+: Tutorials, Articles, Tips, Etc.
Design Modo: Professional Design Framework for Designers and Developers
Codrops: Tutorials, Articles and Freebies
Grain Edit: Focused on classic design work from the 1950s-1970s

Currently interning at Go Media
Currently interning at Go
Media

Kyle Saxton’s Picks

Daily Drop Cap: A project by designer & illustrator Jessica Hische
Awwwards: Website Awards that recognize the talent of the best developers, designers and web agencies in the world
Colour Lovers:  Community to share create and share colors, palettes and patterns
Beautiful Type:  A blog dedicated to beautiful typography
Flat StudioDesign Inspiration

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Did we miss something?  Tell us your favorite blogs below!


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An Eye for Design: Building An Affordable Luxury Brand

Kumar Arora is entrepreneur meets designer.

Kumar Arora
Kumar Arora: Entrepreneur, Designer, Consultant, Business Angel & Marketing Connoisseur.

His mother, a student of all things art and his father a scientist specializing in nano coatings for eyeglass lenses, Arora was surrounded by inspiration.  Watching, observing, studying, a student of Cleveland’s Case Western Reserve University and an Economics major at the Ohio State University, it seemed as if he was destined to create something big, something of his own one day.

Rogue Eyewear has been a project well thought out over the years but is finally coming to fruition.”

While the concept was in the back of his mind for years, it was a plan that was set in motion after Arora partnered with a fellow Clevelander, Glen Infante, of the streetwear brand, iLTHY in late 2011. “Working alongside (Infante) gave me the knowledge of brand identity, and resources for Rogue. I have been fortunate to be a part of its story.”

In 2012, Arora headed to Milan for the optical conference MIDO, and was further inspired to hit the ground running, designing sample styles on his trip back home.

2

Although Arora’s concept was inspired by favorites including “SUPER Sunglasses, Oliver People’s, Maui Jim, and the ever popular Rayban,” his concept was unique: to build an affordable luxury brand.

“The name Rogue itself described my state of mind when designing the pieces and starting up with this venture. The concept came about because I was angry. Everywhere I would go, I would see so many brands doing great things in much bigger cities and always charging such high prices for luxury. I wanted to change that. Rogue Eyewear is a departure in every possible way: from materials, to cost, to being home grown…without compromising in any way.”

How to marry two things that are usually seen with irony? Arora laughs, “That’s not an easy thing to say. Luxury and affordable are generally two things that never tend to work together. The problem today is that people equate luxury with expensive. Can’t blame them either — thats just how society has been conditioned. We’ve achieved this by conveying that in our branding and imagery, working with some phenomenal manufacturers, and quite simply – just not over-inflating the goods itself. No one actually ever said you actually have to pay $300 for a piece of plastic.”

3

Although Arora assures that his frames are affordable, he notes “when coming up with the brand, the number one factor in its creation was to make sure that no expense was spared. From packaging, to look books, to the materials, I wanted to make sure I can deliver a product that can stand the test of time and stand next to the bigger eyewear giants.”

Arora prides his brand on the fact that it was built here in Cleveland and very meticulously so.

“Everything from investment, to design, to product development was done by my internal team. I want to keep working ‘out of the box,’ so much of our marketing, materials used are different than other brands. I can’t give everything away, but as seasons go by – it will be easier to achieve this for us. It’s really important to have everything feel finished. I’ve got a dedicated group from packaging, to customer service, to operations, to design. While we might be an independent and up and coming brand, I did not ever want the customer to feel that we are almost ‘too small.'”

4

Arora excitedly reports quick growth for the company and much excitement for the future.   He secretly dishes on the next line, which will feature materials never used or thought of before.

All of this brand development, Arora admits, is a process that grows and changes day by day. “I’d like to think in the process of brand development, there are often times “human” qualities one can see. A brand can represent an actual person, a state of mind, a philosophy, or even an emotion. In the case for Rogue…it was the feeling I got towards the optical industry having been involved for much of my life but never actually having created something on my own. In essence, the brand is truly an extension of myself.”

His recommendation for new designers on the same path?  “Seek out every puzzle piece before developing a brand. From manufacturing processes, to capital, design, to operation, to even potential distribution channels.”

Arora, with an eye for design and a passion to match, encourages his colleagues to push themselves as they build their own dream product.

“Most designers stick to what they know and never venture out and try to learn other parts of their own business or new skill sets.  That’s too easy. Get down to the gritty stuff and master each part otherwise your brand won’t have a fighting chance.”

See Arora’s creations at Rogue Eyewear, currently available online and locally at the iLTHY Workshop at 6602 Detroit Ave in Cleveland.  Catch his Pop-Up Shops all around Cleveland, including:

7/13 Lakewood Summer Meltdown

7/20 Ale Fest with Cleveland Scene

7/20 Summerpoolooza 2013

7/25 DJ EV Bday Bash @ Earth

Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram

Go Media Podcast – Episode 11: An Interview With Mark Brickey from Adventures in Design

In this episode, we sit down with WMC Fest Speaker Stage MC Mark Brickey from The Adventures in Design Podcast and Hero Design Studio. We talk to him about the challenges of podcasting, the Circle of Trust, and why being a Rockstar in the Design Community is a good thing. Go Media president, Bill, also talks with us about a Responsive Pricing Model, a topic from his upcoming book “Drawn to Business”.

Listen to the Podcast

[powerpress]

Show Notes

Quick Tip: Get Up Early

Jeff walks us through his latest experiment: waking up an hour earlier every day. This lead into how Jeff gets things done. You can find his progress at MakerMistaker.com.

Sponsor of this Episode

This episode is sponsored by WMC Fest 4. WMC Fest is the premier art, design, and music festival in the Midwest. Uniting creative dreamers and doers since 2010. WMC Fest takes place from August 16th through 18th at Cleveland Public Theatre. 20 speakers, 20 designers, and 30+ bands.

What’s Go Media Been Up To

  • WMC Fest Update: Marketing is ready to be sent to print and all the sponsors are sending in swag for the gift bags.
  • Also just added Ink Wars to the Sunday schedule. Ink Wars will be an 8-artist battle. They’ll have an hour to create something awesome with just a blank canvas and black markers. It’ll be hosted by Matt Helm and Mike Jones.
  • Proof Lab is no longer a public product. We still use it internally, but we just can’t support the upkeep for it right now. So, if you’ve got a team of developers who want to partner with us in completing it, contact Bill directly. In June we annoyed a lot of our beta users and customers when a bug in the system caused many of them to be emailed billing notices, despite most not being paying customers.
  • All of our interns are kicking ass. Nathanial joined us in the middle of June. He joins Alex, Kyle, and Carly to work on personal projects, as well as our internal projects including our storefront renovation.
  • Design sales are skyrocketing this year. Thanks in-large to our new accounts team that we brought in last year.
  • We are hiring developers and developer interns.
  • The podcast is now recorded live and we tested out Tlk.io’s embeddable chatroom. You can check that out at GoMediaZine.com/Live
  • We began testing out using mostly-functional prototypes instead of graphic-based wireframes to map out the construction of a site. We’ve got it working with two client projects now, and both are getting excellent reviews. To make these Prototypes, we’re using Foundation 4.

A Topic From Bill’s Book: Use A Responsive Pricing Model

We discuss the idea of not following a fixed model when pricing out projects. Instead, base it on your total workload. If you are packed, then charge full price. But, if you have time open and you need to bring in projects to fill that time, be more open to offering lower prices on your proposals to get clients in the door.

Links

Credits

Hosts: Jeff Finley and Bill Beachy
Producer: Bryan Garvin
Recorded at: Go Media

Sponsorship Opportunities

Interested in sponsoring the Go Media podcast, either episodically or exclusively? Well, hit us up at [email protected] if you are interested in advertising your business.

What Do You Think?

We want to hear what you think about the latest episode of our podcast and what topics you would like to see covered in upcoming episodes. Comment below with your suggestions.

Ready for More?

Keep learning and listening to more Go Media podcasts!

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability

Forewords

Chad Tibbits is a super talented apparel designer, WMC Fest alum, and all around nice guy. As for Chad, we’re super happy to have him join the patiently growing, curated list of Arsenal contributors. His first halftoned texture pack focuses on dust, speckles, and other vintage look inducing goodness. Let’s have a look:

Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal

The pack is delivered in multiple formats: one PSD that includes a “threshold” and the halftoned version of the texture, CMYK jpgs of both, RGB jps of both, and transparent background pngs. The halftone versions are the most detailed, while the “threshold” are more intense. There are 10 different textures, coming from different sources: old paper, various grain, etc. These are super versatile, and Chad’s tutorial below only demonstrates one of the many ways these can be put to good use. I’d suggest pasting these in a text block layer mask. Just saying.

Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal Halftone Texture Pack - Vol. 1 - Dust by Chad Tibbits - Go Media's Arsenal

The “lighter” versions of the images are the halftoned versions. If I were you, I wouldn’t hesitate to grab this awesome set. On that note, time for Chad’s tutorial. On the menu today: some apparel design, but the techniques can be extrapolated for many other uses. Enjoy!

— Simon, Manager for the Arsenal

_________________________________________________________________________

For this tutorial, we will be creating a silk-screened graphic in Photoshop that can be used as either an apparel graphic or as a poster. Here is a preview of what my final image looks like. Note: Graphics can vary in look – this all depends on the use of the textures and type treatments.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability

Step 1: Set Up Your Photoshop Document

Your size can vary but in this example I set up the document at 11” x 11” @ 300 DPI and CMYK. In this example, I am planning on using the design for an apparel design.  Therefore, I am selecting a size that can fit within the common screen print size; so keep that in mind.

Step 2: Choose Your Photo

For this design I chose a pink flower from sxc.hu. Once you download the image, drag and drop it onto your Photoshop document. Luckily, this photo has a nice clean/white background.  So in this case, complete a quick select of the white with your Magic Wand Tool, and delete out the outer white that surrounds the flower.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Source image

Step 3: Begin To Edit Your Flower

Duplicate your flower and with your new layer: click on your upper toolbar under Image > Adjustment > Threshold. Using the slider, adjust the Threshold Level to your desired detail level.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Threshold

In the upper toolbar click Select > ColorRange. From here, you can select all of the white in the photo and delete it.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Threshold

Now that the white background is removed, double click on the layer icon and click Color Overlay in your Layer Styles. Here you can choose whichever color you would like in creating this layer. I chose PANTONE 7427 C or #9d162e.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Coloring

Step 4: Add More Color To The Flower

Duplicate your original flower layer again. Once your layer is duplicated, take your new layer and double click on the layer icon to go back into Layer Styles. Click on Color Overlay again and turn the flower into whatever color you’d like. In this example I used PANTONE 4975 C or #411f1f.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Coloring

Next, click on your Ellipse Tool in your tool bar and create a circle. This will act as the center of the flower. Once you’ve created your circle, click your layer icon and select your desired color, I chose PANTONE 729 C or #b7814f. Place this in-between your two flower layers and you should have something that looks like the following.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Coloring

Step 5: Add Some Distress

With this step you will need to purchase the Halftone Texture Pack – Volume 1 – Dust I just created for Go Media’s Arsenal. This particular texture is in Group #2.

Chad Tibbits' Halftone Texture Pack - Volume 1 - Dust - Go Media's Arsenal

Open Halftone Dust Textures and drag Group #2 overtop all of your visible layers. Double click on one or both layer icons (halftone and threshold) and click Color Overlay in your Layer Styles. Then, select your background color as the color overlay.

From here you can choose how much detail/distress you would like to have on your piece. Using just the halftone layer shows all of the distress detail, just with finer detail. The threshold layer does not have as much fine detail to it, but it can help make your distress more apparent. Feel free to bring in more distress layers or even duplicate the ones in Group #2 to give your piece even more distress.

After altering your distress to your liking, press Command/CTRL+Click on your distress layers.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Distressing

Now select the first layer of your flower and click “delete”. Repeat this step on each of your layers that make up your flower. You will now be able to turn your off your distress layer/s and you should see the same effect as if it were still on.

Step 6: Add Some Flare

For this piece I imported a typographic piece that I made for the artist.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Type

Duplicate your layer and hide your duplicate layer, this will be used for the next step. Then go back to Halftone Dust Textures and take Group #1 and place it over top of your text/logo and repeat the same steps as the step before to give the same kind of distress look.

Chad Tibbits' Halftone Texture Pack - Volume 1 - Dust - Go Media's Arsenal How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Distressing

Step 7: Bold It Up

Reveal your duplicate layer and decrease your layer fill to 0%. Double click on your layer icon in your Layer Styles and click on Inner Glow. Feel free to follow my same selection or choose what looks best with your piece. The black inner glow may be deceiving but bear with me; this will make the next step a bit easier.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Type

When choosing your inner glow, try and create an inner glow that helps your text/logo stand out from the background color and flower graphic.

Step 8: Halftone It!

After achieving an inner glow that works for your design, hide all of your layers except for your inner glow layer. Then click Image >Mode > Grayscale and if asked to Rasterize/Merge do so. This step will be undone soon. After doing so, click Image > Mode > Bitmap. From here select a 300 Pixels/Inch Resolution and a Method Use: Halftone Screen.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Type

On the next option (Halftone Screen) I use the following settings that are recommended by Jakprints.

(In case you aren’t sure who they are, Jakprints is an amazing independently owned print shop here in Cleveland that specializes high quality printing. Any print job you have, they can handle!)

  • Frequency: 45 Lines/Inch
  • Angle: 23.5 degrees
  • Shape: Elipse

Once applying the halftone, click Command/CTRL+A and select the entire board and then click Command/CTRL+C to copy it. Now click Command/CTRL+Option/ALT+Z multiple times to go back to your latest layered files. You will now hit Command/CTRL+V, placing your halftoned graphic with the rest of your layers. Now click Select > Color Range. From here you will select all of the white in the photo and delete it.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Type

After deleting all of your white, reveal all of your working layers and do a color overlay on your new halftoned layer. With this layer do a white color overlay to match your text/logo.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Type

Step 9: Merge Layers

Now that your layers are using proper halftones you can merge your layers together that share the same color values. In this example, the only color that shares the same values are the whites.

Step 10: Separate Layers

Now that your layers are separated into your print colors, it is time to separate the screen colors. Click on your upper layer (your type/logo layer) and click Command/CTRL+Click. Now delete that selection from your three layers that are below it. Repeat this step for every layer and delete each layer’s selections from the layer that’s below it.

Step 11: Donezo!

You should now be able to turn each individual layer off seeing the separation between all of your other layers.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Color separation

It’s time to mock this baby up, and to land that art approval.

How to Create Vintage T-Shirt Designs with No Drawing Ability - Final art, mocked up

Create a grindhouse-inspired background with the Microscopic Fingerprint texture set

A note from the editor

Dustin is someone I’m super pumped to finally have writing for the Zine, and as an Arsenal contributor. As a designer, his countless free texture contributions to Lost and Taken, Bittbox, and his own site, Valleys in the Vinyl, have made my life so much easier. The pack of 15 textures he created for us is simply amazing, unique, and beautiful. These images could stand as poster in their own right. You should totally check the pack out on the Arsenal, and purchase it. Here’s a quick preview of what you’ll get when purchasing the pack:

Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal vMicroscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal

On that note, I’ll pass him the microphone again!

— Simon, Manager for Go Media’s Arsenal

__________________________________________________________

Most digital artists can readily admit that texture building and other manipulation techniques are not exact sciences. The pure spontaneous bursts of clarity and inspiration make this work so much fun. Today I’ll be walking you through a breakdown of this grindhouse-inspired texture build. We’ll be using some of the images from my newly released Microscopic Fingerprints set over at the Go Media Arsenal, along with some textures taken from my texture resource site Valleys in the Vinyl.

Something to bear in mind with this kind of tutorial is that the finished piece almost never happens in clear, concise steps like this. Your composition is a revolving door of different images, with the layers moving around like deck of cards being shuffled. Here you can see how the finished image is constructed and get a glance at how the different images build upon one another. You may not be allowed to see the missteps and outcasts from this piece’s creation, but at least you can get a glimpse at how these image elements interact to form a finished design.

Here’s what we will be making today

GoMediaArsenal_MicroscopicFingerprint_Tutorial-FinalImage

Click the image to view a hi-res version

Before we get started, you ought to do yourself a favor and head over to the Arsenal and purchase the Microscopic Fingerprint Texture Pack.

Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal

Let us begin

Our Assets

  1. Microscopic Fingerprints (Texture #1)
    Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - #1 - Go Media's Arsenal
  2. Microscopic Fingerprints (Texture #3)
    Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - #3 - Go Media's Arsenal
  3. Microscopic Fingerprints (Texture #11)
    Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - #11 - Go Media's Arsenal
  4. 12 Microscopic Bubble Textures (Texture #1)
    VV_MicroscopicBubbles_01
  5. 10 Duotone Grunge Textures (Texture # 8)
    VV_DuotoneGrunge_08
  6. 5 Dynamic Vintage Grunge Textures (Texture #4)
    VV_DynamicVintageGrunge_04
  7. Textures Shot on 35mm Film: Volume One (Texture #11)
    VV_35mmGrabBagVolumeOne_11

Step One

Our Photoshop canvas will be set at 3000px wide and 2000px tall, with a white background (though for this project, the background setting is irrelevant). For our base texture layer, we are going to use the VV_DuotoneGrunge_08 texture, with Blending Mode set at Normal and 100% opacity. No truly discernable elements will shine through on our finished product, but it gives us a solid grunge texture foundation we can build upon.

Create a grindhouse-inspired background with the Microscopic Fingerprint texture set - One

Step Two

Now from this new Microscopic Fingerprints set, we will drag Texture #1 onto our canvas. Set the Blending Mode to Overlay and leave at 100% opacity. You’ll see that nice grooved pattern in the foreground with some of our base duotone grunge coming through.

Create a grindhouse-inspired background with the Microscopic Fingerprint texture set - Two

Step Three

Next let’s take Texture #11 from this Microscopic Fingerprints set and place it on our composition. Set the Blending Mode to Color Burn and opacity at 50%. You’ll see out composition get a more uniform orange tone, and some of the blacks in the corners become darker. The effects are similar to adding a Curves or Levels adjustment layer. By giving this layer more opacity, you can see how the effect’s potential intensity.

Create a grindhouse-inspired background with the Microscopic Fingerprint texture set - Three

Step Four

Our bubbles layer is getting added to the pot next. Add VV_MicroscopicBubbles_01 to your composition, set the Blending Mode to Overlay and opacity to 75%.

Create a grindhouse-inspired background with the Microscopic Fingerprint texture set - Four

Step Five

The fifth texture we are using is VV_DynamicVintageGrunge_04. Rotate this one 90 degrees clockwise, set the Blending Mode to Subtract, and bring the opacity down to 30%. You’ll see that this texture adds some center-focused grunge elements, minor shadowing to the corners, and brings down the harshness of the orange. We are almost finished!

Create a grindhouse-inspired background with the Microscopic Fingerprint texture set - Five

Step Six

This next step will get us very close to our finished design. From the Microscopic Fingerprints, we are going to put Texture #3 onto our canvas. Set the Blending Mode to Color Burn and leave the opacity all the way up at 100%. We are finally seeing this image get some real attitude and taking on that hardcore grindhouse look.

Create a grindhouse-inspired background with the Microscopic Fingerprint texture set - Six

Step Seven

Finally we arrive at our last step. To finish our piece, we will call on the VV_35mmGrabBagVolumeOne_11. Set the Blending Mode to Pin Light and bring the opacity down a bit to 75%. This 35mm texture gives us that nice gradation of blue into the other red tones, easily adding some more depth and atmosphere to the piece. The bits of film noise also add some subtle effects to the top right corner, adding to the layered appearance of the design.

Create a grindhouse-inspired background with the Microscopic Fingerprint texture set - Seven
click image to view hi-res version

We’re done!

You’ll notice that we don’t use a single adjustment layer in our composition. Manipulating blending modes and opacity levels fill all of our needs here.

The piece moves between light color tones and into very harsh deep blacks, with lots of other graphic elements working together to give us our finished design. The diagonal streak effects from our fingerprint textures lay on top of our bubbles and other grunge, creating a feeling of looking through different windows and degrees of degradation.

Have fun experimenting and creating with this new texture set. Feel encouraged to ask any questions and submit any finished work to the Go Media Flickr Pool. Enjoy!

Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack - Go Media's Arsenal

How to Sell Design Services Like Products

A big hello to you all! I’m Lauren, Account Services Manager (a.k.a. ‘sales girl’) here at Go Media. I’m thrilled to be connected with such an amazing community and look forward to sharing my contributions.

Moving from a Customer Service to a Product Oriented Service Firm

Out of a desire for company growth and expansion, Go Media has recently shifted to a product-based system of selling design services. What does switching from being a custom service firm to a product oriented service firm look like?

1.  Narrow your service offerings so you only do a few key things, but do them better than anyone else!

2. Build production processes around those few key offerings so they can be taught easily. The goal is to refine your process to the point that even a mediocre designer will achieve spectacular results when following your process.

3. Build strong marketing around those key items, following steps from the likes of Roxanne Carah Marante. Create sell sheets, e-newsletters campaigns, POS pages and the like that effectively communicate the process, benefits, and value!

4.  Build templatized proposals around those services so you spend less time writing and more time selling. Writing custom proposals for custom services can take a long time, not to mention that they often require the specialized or expertise knowledge of a few select employees.

The Benefits

The designing itself is still custom, but everything around the designing itself is extremely structured! For all of you artists out there who own a business or freelance, there are some HUGE benefits to selling your design service offerings like products.  Benefits include:

easytosell

Selling a project that has such a clear definition is significantly easier to sell! The sales team can easily walk a client through the branding process. Proposals can get churned out faster and negotiating is objective. Having clearly defined products streamlines our internal processes and ensure that our entire team, from sales to project management to production, is on the same page from start to finish.

teachable

Teaching your process and offerings to employees becomes seamless! They learn easier and FASTER. Specific to a sales team, instead of needing the expertise of one or two people in order to write a proposal and land a project, sales people can work more independently while the creative team focuses on production! For the entrepreneurs out there, having a product-based business model means that your business can thrive without you if you have a sales team that knows the process and products like the back of their hand!

Teaching your client about what’s being offered is just as paramount and also becomes effortless! Point of sale and marketing pieces can easily be created, outlining all of the features and benefits clearly and concisely. While it’s essential that you and your sales team have this knowledge, stand-alone marketing pieces that will effectively delineate and communicate your value to the audience is hugely beneficial!

client

As mentioned in #1, a well-defined system with outlined deliverables from the onset of the sales process helps to keep customer expectations in line. The client knows what to expect at each stage throughout. Specific to Go Identity mentioned above, the steps, deliverable(s), and amount of revisions are clearly defined from the onset, leaving no gray area, or unrealistic expectations, as to what is being delivered.

profitability

The design service industry is easily susceptible to earning little to no profit margins based on amount of hours worked versus the cost of the project. Having a standardized process and selling defined products at strategic price points helps to ensure that projects stay on scope. Selling services like products help to avoid the common ‘blackhole’ of the sometimes never-ending revision, feedback, revision, feedback cycle.

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Moving from a custom-oriented service firm to a  product-based firm has benefited Go Media in numerous ways. Share your experiences with us below!