21 Hand Lettering Artists to Follow on Instagram

Hand Lettering Artists to Follow on Instagram

Wandering around Instagram, we found some really beautiful examples of hand lettering that we thought we’d share. We thought they might inspire and ignite your next project. Enjoy the hand lettering artists to follow on Instagram and please click on each image to learn more about the artist who created the individual piece.

For more hand lettering inspiration, check out our post “Letters We’re Loving: 30+ Hand Lettering and Typography Inspirations” and
one of our most popular articles, “100 Top Resources for Typography and Hand-Lettering

Elizabeth Gray (thegraytergood)

Hand Lettering Artists to Follow on Instagram

Lisa Quine (lisa_quine)

Hand Lettering Artists to Follow on Instagram

Pierre Boisson (pedrodelabedida)

Katie Made That (katiemadethat)

Loren Klein (lorenkleindesign)

Talita Marques (marquestalita)

Maxime Bolis (maximebolis)

Saori (_lil.something_)

Jessica Renna (jessicarenna)

Michael Moodie (michael_moodie)

Loz Ives (idleletters)

Shauna Parmesan (weneedtotalkproject)

Tiffany Dewitt (livelongandletter)

Annick Martin (annick.martin)

Indysign (theindysign)

Jessica Nam (jessicanam)

Tearapart Intajak (tump_tearapart)

Emmy (redpolarbear_)

Devin Rista (devinrista)

Joanna Walters (jopeydopes)

Deirdre (the designer) (deirdrethedesigner)

WMC Fest Storytime: Meet Scotty Russell

Meet Scotty Russell of Perspective Collective

It’s time for another video! This video is another in a line of shorts introducing you to the speakers who will be presenting at our design, art and music conference, Weapons of Mass Creation Festival. Today’s video introduces you to Cedar Falls, Iowa native, Scotty Russell.

Download of the Day: Free Laurel Brush Pack

Download of the Day: Hand-Drawn Foliage Brushes for AI

Hand-Lettering and Typography Inspirations

Letters We’re Loving: 30+ Hand-Lettering and Typography Inspirations

Creators. Doers. Makers. Video Series – WMC Fest Episode 1: Danielle Evans

The WMC Fest Creators. Doers. Makers. Series

Our new video series highlights remarkable makers and designers that inspire and motivate us to create greatness. This week we put the spotlight on Danielle Evans. You may recognize Danielle’s work from this year’s Ink Wars competition or her downright delicious Food and Dimensional Typography Workshop – both featured at the best creative conference of the summer, Go Media’s Weapons of Mass Creation Fest!

danielle-evans-instagram

If you’re unfamiliar, Danielle Evans, aka Marmaladebleue, is an urban Columbus, Ohio native. She derives great pleasure in walking everywhere, taking food photos on Instagram, and being ‘the cool aunt’. Her heartstrings are plucked by lettering, which she exhibits through most notably food and dimensional type. Her work is thoughtful and inventive, elevating commonplace items into extraordinary lettering. She art directs, food styles, and collaborates with personable and quirky clients to achieve authentic and approachable work for social media campaigns, editorials, and advertising.

Weapons of Mass Creation Fest is presented by Cleveland web design, logo design and graphic design studio Go Media.

Watch the Video Now:

The Creators. Doers. Makers. Series, directed by Aaron Freeder, will be back with more videos highlighting your favorite Weapons of Mass Creation Fest artists. Continue checking back here on the ‘Zine or over at wmcfest.com for more great features.

Food Typography Video
Watch Episode 2: Michael Bierut

Become a Master Typographer: Playing with Your Food (and Other Ways to Get Creative with Type)

Header art work by Dominique Falla

Become a Master Typographer:

In this, our Become a Master Typographer series, we’ve discussed:

We’ve also shared 100 of our favorite Top Resources for Typography and Hand-Lettering. And today, we’re here for what may possibly be our favorite subject of all (and what we touched on in our Pro Tips post.) Yep, today we’re throwing all caution to the wind, thinking outside of the box and getting down and dirty with type. Just because we can.

Join us.

Think beyond type.

Now that you’re getting comfortable examining and experimenting with type, it’s time to put the pen down and think outside of the box. Today, we’re chatting with some artists who have found success in typography with other, more creative mediums. These amazing designers include tactile typographer Dominique Falla, typographer/letterer Joseph Alessio, and graphic designers Alex TimokhovskyMichael MahaffeyEcho Chen and Maria PisoniCrafting letters with materials like food and other goodies. Here’s what they recommend:

Edible Art (Coloured gum paste on cake board) created by Dominique Falla
Edible Art (Coloured gum paste on cake board) created by tactile typographer Dominique Falla

1. Find your inspiration, Follow through

“Sometimes the inspiration can come from the words and sometimes materials. If I see a new material I haven’t used before, I will often generate a project based around the textures or colours of the material so I can use it for a project. If I’m given words from a client, or a phrase jumps out at me, I will look at how those words can best be expressed through materials.

I always keep a notebook handy and I engage in a regular daily process of stream-of-consciousness writing, and this way I can record ideas as they come to me, or mine my subconscious for ideas if I can’t “think” of anything directly.

In the beginning, I was creating pieces based on personal interest, I would enter competitions and generate work for fun. Now most of my work comes about because a client has a specific project where they need a piece of tactile typography. I did a piece for Google last year where it was all about the branding for their conference. We used the Google colours and their conference tagline “Here’s to the Curious” so that was mostly pre worked out for me, whereas I did some illustrations for a Seattle University Magazine where they provided the word and it was up to me to decide how to best communicate it.” – Dominique Falla, Tactile Typographer

"Diamonds and Rust" Typography Poster by Alex Timokhovsky and Lignature Collective
“Diamonds and Rust” Typography Poster by Alex Timokhovsky and Lignature Collective

“Concentrate on your word or phrase first. My inspiration often comes from music. Spend a lot of time thinking about this phrase and how could it be realized. Make a lot of sketches, search letterforms. After that comes researching: make drafts, analyze and fix faults. When everything is okay, make a final version.” – Alex Timokhovsky, Graphic Designer

"Diamonds and Rust" Typography Poster by Alex Timokhovsky and Lignature Collective
“Diamonds and Rust” Typography Poster by Alex Timokhovsky and Lignature Collective

2. Start with the Sketch

“The medium always informs the process, but for me, everything starts with pencil and paper. Small sketches, usually just a couple of inches across—starting tiny helps to solidify the overall composition. For a typical type treatment I’ll stay on paper for a long time, fleshing it out, and sometimes I do 90%+ of the work on paper; other times I do it more quickly on paper and then take it to vector. For a physical piece, though, I make sure to test out the medium—how will the paint interact with this surface? Will this substance maintain its shape after I place it?—and it often takes a few iterations to get it just right!” – – Joseph Alessio, Typographer, Letterer

3. Emphasize Letters, Follow the Rules

“Care about every letter awareness. Materials should emphasize letters. Typography first!” – Alex Timokhovsky

TypeLimited P002 Project by Joseph Alessio
TypeLimited P002 Project by Joseph Alessio

“I’m a strong believer in fundamentals. Sometimes a creative medium is interesting enough that it can distract from a poor understanding or execution of typographic principle, but that’s never ideal. Having the knowledge and skillset to bring quality letterforms into new media is definitely as important; otherwise it’s not doing justice to the message you’re conveying! Sometimes the message might include a vernacular and handmade quality, which offers more flexibility in regards to precision, but that’s never an excuse for poor fundamentals.” – Joseph Alessio

Dominique Falla—Tactile Typographer from Camille Santiago on Vimeo.

“Mostly the “rules” around typography tend to apply to large blocks of text. When I’m laying pages out in InDesign, this is where the balance, weight, proportion, multiple families, visual hierarchy, clarity, leading etc all come to play. Generally my tactile typography pieces are one or a few words so the rules applying to legibility, clarity, balance and kerning all definitely apply, but paragraph styles and layout tend not to. The other thing to bear in mind when creating custom type pieces is that if you’re basing your design on an existing typeface, they have worked out a lot of that for you, but if you are creating custom type first, I would spend a lot of type refining that before you then render it in non-digital ways because you tend to lose legibility when you make type out of cheese for example, so you need to make sure the type is rock solid as a vector or hand drawing before you mess with it any further.” – Dominique Falla

Niedlov's Breadworks Project by Michel Mahaffey
Niedlov’s Breadworks Project by Michel Mahaffey

4. Be Legible

“What I think is important, over rules of typography, is the legibility of the final product. As a designer, my job is to communicate for my client in (hopefully) a beautiful, thought provoking way. If you can’t read what I’ve designed, then I haven’t done my job and am doing a disservice to my client.” – Michael Mahaffey, Graphic Designer, Illustrator

NL_3.1_Large

5. Communicate Passion

“The crew at Niedlov’s Breadworks has more passion for baking bread than I think most people have for anything. They’re kind of into it. It would have been easy to grab a nice typeface, set it all tight and pretty on top of a sweet bakery photo and be done with the project, but I wanted to show the amount of painstaking work they put into making their bread. That started with hand lettering their tagline “We Love to Knead, We Knead to Love.” After I felt like I was in a good spot with that, I scanned and projected the layout facing downward onto a table and got to work kneading dough. Shaping dough into letterforms is in no way fun, nor easy. I promise. But in the end I felt like I had a beautiful piece that aligned with their brand and voice.” – Michael Mahaffey

Postcards from Rome (assorted pasta on paper) by Dominique Falla
Postcards from Rome (assorted pasta on paper) by Dominique Falla

6. Understand the unique challenges

“I think taking time to resolve the typography BEFORE you work with unusual materials is really the best advice I can give. If the typography is clean and solid and working well as a vector or clean drawing, then you introduce the materials, you’re less likely to run in to trouble than if you just pull out some materials and start playing. There’s certainly something to be said for experimentation, but I always resolve my letterforms first, especially if it’s for a client. It might be the most creative piece you’ve ever seen, but if you can’t read what it says, the whole project was a waste of time.

In terms of challenges with my work, the main ones are repetitive strain injury and boredom. My techniques, especially my string ones are very time-consuming and tedious. On the larger pieces, my husband helps out so we can talk to each other and share the load. I also work with camera operators on a regular basis so it’s nice to have them to talk to. I sometimes watch movies whilst I work, or listen to music as it can be very boring. This is why I like the onsite installations the best, such as the Google project, because there are always things happening around me and it keeps it interesting. I’ve had some very late nights alone in my studio winding string that can be very depressing, so more installations please! I like people and noise and movement around me.” – Dominique Falla

d90379de2ac6297cd859ad99ec10d34a
“I always approach food, paper, and other types of non-traditional typography with an open mind. It’s important to be patient and set aside a good block of time when working with these mediums. Food can be a bit difficult to work with, and it often doesn’t behave in the way you would expect it to.” – Echo Chen, Designer, Painter

creative typography

“When working with some unusual materials there’s always challenges, for example in the project shown above, I wanted to make sure that every leaf was as big as the others and the same color. As you’re not working digitally, you can’t go back with a simple “ctrl+z”. In my case I first prepared all the leaves and left them there to take the picture the day after. When I came back I found that all the leaves were dry and wrinkled. I had to do everything again. It’s always a challenge working with materials, but when the work is finished the satisfaction is higher.” – Maria Pisoni, Designer

7. Be prepared for massive rewards

I grew up in the wood shop with my dad watching him make things with his hands. The design business generally happens in a “we need this yesterday” fashion, so it’s really gratifying when I can walk away from the computer and work. Making things out of non-traditional materials with my hands is nostalgic and meaningful. I was able to share my passion for typography by communicating Niedlov’s passion for making bread to the world and I think that’s pretty damn awesome. – Michael Mahaffey

Ideas are 1% Inspiration and 99% Perspiration (Map pins on black foam core) by  Dominique Falla
Ideas are 1% Inspiration and 99% Perspiration (Map pins on black foam core) by Dominique Falla

8. Push the Limits

“So far I’ve worked with fresh italian ingredients for my Gusto piece, chocolate powder for Cappuccino, I’ve worked with cake and fondant for a 40th birthday cake, dried pasta, cake decorating gels, tea leaves and pizza ingredients. They all come with their own set of challenges and again, it’s like with anything, the ingredients need to reinforce the message. There’s no point making typography that says something different to what it’s made out of, it just doesn’t make sense, so if you can think of something that hasn’t been done yet, then do it.

I’d recommend experimenting first, food styling is one of the most difficult types of photography because you only have a certain amount of time before some ingredients spoil. You also don’t necessarily need to use the thing you’re talking about to convey the look of the thing. For example, I wanted a really bright sticky look for a piece about Gelato, but real gelato just wouldn’t work, so we used cake decorating gels instead. It gave the look l was after without using the real thing. There’s a saying in styling photography that the camera only sees the last coat of paint, which means, it doesn’t matter what it’s made out of so long as it looks real in the photo. Obviously if you’re making something for eating or installation though, then the thing needs to be real.

You should also be careful when making the real thing that it tastes good and doesn’t poison anyone. I made a typography cake in conjunction with a chef because at the launch, the piece got eaten, so we had to make sure it looked good for two hours then tasted great for two minutes!” – Dominique Falla

“There’s so much possibility out there, and so much fun to be had. Nail down your fundamentals, and then explore! Always stay away from copying—it’s simply being creatively negligent, but it’s also creatively unfulfilling and there are so many possibilities out there that you can find instead. Otherwise, there’s a world of interesting ideas out there!” – Joseph Alessio

– What creative materials do you enjoy working with? What challenges have you faced? Share with us in the comments below! –

More about:

Dominique Falla | Twitter | Dribbble | Facebook | Tumblr
Joseph Alessio | Twitter | Tumblr | Pinterest | Dribbble | Instagram
Alex Timokhovsky | Skilled in Letters Blog | Dribbble | Facebook | Instagram
Michael Mahaffey | Twitter | Dribbble | Vimeo
Maria Pisoni | Flickr
Echo Chen | Instagram

Become a Master Typographer: Pro Tips – Making and Breaking the Rules

As with life, rules in both the lands of lettering and typography are made for a reason.

In many cases, it’s best to stick to the books. However, in other cases, it’s quite alright to bend (and even break) the rules.

Illustrator and Hand Letterer Darren Booth points out that following rules too stringently can negatively affecting lettering work. He says, “I fear (rules) negatively affect my hand-lettering work. I typically approach my hand-lettering like a standard drawing – with shapes and forms, and I keep going until it feels right.”

Pro Tips

We asked some of our favorite hand-letterers, calligraphers and typographers which rules they love to follow and those they love to break. Read on for their pro tips and leave your recommendations in the comments below!

Courtesy of BLK Box Labs
Courtesy of BLKBox Labs

Do Mind Hierarchy

In any project using typography there will always be a hierarchy. Hierarchy is so important because it can completely change the context or readability of a piece if the wrong word or words are emphasized. I always look for ways to create a more visually interesting piece or try to communicate a message by using hierarchy, but you have to be careful that you are not sacrificing any readability or else your message can be lost or completely misunderstood.  – Jeremy Teff, Designer, BLKBOXLabs

Marks & Spencers Biscuit Tin | Courtesy of Kate Forrester
Marks & Spencers Biscuit Tin | Courtesy of Kate Forrester

Experiment

I have more of an illustrator’s approach than a graphic designer’s approach to lettering. My words form a picture to me and I tend to go by eye rather than follow rules of kerning, etc.! I say, start loose and experimental – play with brushes and materials, make a mess before you hit the computer – there is time to tighten things up further down the line. – Kate Forrester, Freelance Illustrator & Calligrapher

Bryan Patrick Todd
Bryan Patrick Todd

Work towards Harmony

When customizing type, be aware of each letter and its neighboring letters. Making a few small adjustments to one letter can potentially disrupt the flow and balance of the word as a whole. The goal is for all the letters in the word(s) to work together in harmony. – Bryan Patrick Todd, Graphic Designer

Give / Take | Courtesy of Jason Carne
Give / Take | Courtesy of Jason Carne

Think: Less is More

The idea of “less is more” works on numerous levels, but it’s a rule I love breaking as often as possible. It’s wise for logos and branding, it’s ideal for effective speeches and slogans, and it’s necessity in many ways to product design – a specialized product that does less is almost always better than something that “does it all”. With all of that considered, less is not always more. When I’m commissioned for a label design or a t-shirt design, I absolutely love it when a client says to go crazy with it and make it as detail intensive, intricate and ornamental as possible. I’ve heard plenty of quotes that say good design should be virtually invisible and that things should be reduced to their most basic purpose and function which is fine most of the time. However, I also believe that design can and should be beautiful, toiled-over, and something that makes someone stop in their tracks when they see it. – Jason Carne, Freelance Designer

Alison Rowan
Alison Rowan

Keep it in the Family

I would say: If you’re not confident yet in your ability to judge a high-quality typeface from a bad one, check to see if it’s part of a type family that includes other weights or styles (Think bold, italic, light, etc.). Typefaces that have a family to back them up are not only more flexible for your projects, but they also tend to be better designed, so you’re less likely to look back at your choice and cringe in a couple years when your eye for type has improved. – Alison Rowan, Graphic Designer

Logos | Courtesy of Ged Palmer
Logos | Courtesy of Ged Palmer

Understand the difference between calligraphy, lettering and typography. 

Calligraphy is the written letter, lettering the drawn letter and typography the arrangement of typefaces. Our written language has its basis in writing and different tools create different styles of letterforms, for example a chisel tip for blackletter, a brush for brush script and a pointed pen for copperplate. If you are interested in getting to know typography then the best place to start is with calligraphy, to establish what authentic forms look like and from there you can experiment with lettering and gain a greater appreciation of which style of typeface to use in a given context. – Ged Palmer, Graphic Designer

Undone | Courtesy of David McLeod
Undone | Courtesy of David McLeod

Begin with a Sketch

I always begin with a quick sketch on paper. No matter what the the project is, I find that this is the best way to establish whether an idea or composition works.  – David McLeod, Graphic Designer

Courtesy of Sabeena Karnik
Courtesy of Sabeena Karnik

The one rule I always follow is to sketch and draw the idea always. Every visual in your mind translates into a drawing. And the one I often break is not sticking to the original drawing. The mind keeps getting ideas constantly and more often than not the final outcome is quite different from what was originally in mind. – Sabeena Karnik, Graphic Designer, Illustrator, Typographer

Make it Visible

At school I remember a teacher once telling me that the best typography is that which is invisible. Maybe this might makes sense when it comes to way-finding labeling perhaps and conveying sterile information. But on the other hand, when it comes to communicating a concept or an ideas with layers of complexity through type, its treatment can enhance the communication of a particular emotion or tone which to do effectively in many cases requires that the typography be anything but invisible. – Luke Lucas, Graphic Designer, Typographer

Weapons of Mass Creation by Mary Kate McDevitt
Weapons of Mass Creation by Mary Kate McDevitt

Keep it Loose

Over the years, with practice and research I’ve learned some basic rules that help with readability or where a letter’s thick variations should be, but I prefer to let the concept or composition drive the letters. Concentrating on rules to follow could make my work feel contrived. My one important rule to follow when it comes to lettering is to keep it loose and build a piece up more like a painting than creating perfect letters that spell something out. – Mary Kate McDevitt, Hand Letterer and Illustrator

Don’t Get Lost in the Details

Try not to get so lost in the details that the lettering becomes hard or impossible to read. Believe me, it happens sometimes. It sounds silly, but zooming out periodically to see how the details are affecting the piece helps keep perspective. – Bryan Patrick Todd, Graphic Designer

Black Wolf Press Piece | Courtesy of Jason Carne
Black Wolf Press Piece | Courtesy of Jason Carne

Don’t Stretch or Squeeze

Never, and I mean never stretch or squeeze type. Type designers by nature are super obsessive down to the smallest detail while remaining “big picture” thinkers. If type has certain proportions, it was made that way for a reason, even if it’s not readily apparent to you. Think of it this way – to everyone with a good understanding of type and how it should look, your stretched type looks about as good as a stretched out collar on a shirt. If a typeface isn’t working how you think it should for a certain application, either research more typefaces and find one more suitable to your needs or go the extra mile and create something custom for the job at hand. – Jason Carne, Freelance Graphic Designer

Rusty Bicycle | Courtesy of Ged Palmer
Rusty Bicycle | Courtesy of Ged Palmer

Consider cultural and historical meaning

Comic sans on a gravestone would look a little strange, no? Style of letterform carry a lot of meaning and these meanings are normally associated with the cultural and historical roots of where they came about. That said the 26 letters from the roman alphabet have gone largely unchanged in 2000 years. So by breaking down the essential nature of the forms and then experimenting with subtle changes you can adapt these ‘abstract forms’ to communicate an intended message. – Ged Palmer, Graphic Designer

Vault 49 Courtesy of David McLeod
Vault 49 Courtesy of David McLeod

Push the Legibility Rule

Given the opportunity I like to push legibility. As long as the message can still be read, I’ll manipulate character forms or break words over multiple lines if it will add to the image. David McLeod, Graphic Designer

So. What rules do you live by? What ones do you love to break? Share with us in the comments below!

Learn more about our contributors:

BLK BOX Labs | Dribbble | Behance | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Vimeo
Kate Forrester | Twitter
Bryan Patrick Todd | Twitter | Instagram | Behance | Pinterest | Dribbble
Jason Carne | Behance | Instagram | Dribbble | Facebook | Twitter | Lettering Library
Alison Rowan | Twitter | Facebook
Ged Palmer | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr | Dribbble | Behance
David McLeodBehance | Instagram | Facebook
Sabeena Karnik Behance | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram
Luke Lucas | Behance | Twitter | Instagram
Mary Kate McDevitt | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | Tumblr | Dribbble
Darren Booth | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | Dribbble

All cover image photos courtesy of Ged Palmer 

Introducing Hand Drawn Lettering Elements: All American Grit

Looking to deliver your client design filled with character and an organic quality only achieved with hand lettering?

Lacking the tools or time to do so?

You’re in luck.

Calligrapher Laura Di Piazza’s first Arsenal product, Hand Drawn Lettering Elements: All American Words, delivers you all the goods you’ll need to bring the human aesthetic you (and your client) desire.

Open up this new product and in moments you can add beautifully crafted words into your work, taking your design from awesome to awe-inspiring and emotive.

Say hello to Hand Drawn Lettering Elements: All American Grit

The pack includes 130 following words in various styles and scripts: work hard, craft, rugged, u.s.a., industries, brotherhood, america, american, craft, pride, honest, genuine, superior, quality, tough, vintage, goods, handcrafted, handmade, original, est., magic, fine, custom, trademark, union, blue collar, artisan and supply.

The lovely lettered words are available in an organized, layered Photoshop document.

As a bonus we’re throwing in three paper textures from our Paper Texture Pack.

hand-drawn-lettering-elements-preview-5

Here’s a little bit about the pack from Laura herself!

“This lettering pack is all-American! It includes words that we associate with America’s strong work ethics and American-made pride. During my recent travels to Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Austria I encountered some people’s opinions about American-made products and the general impression was that American-made is usually equated with ‘well-made’.

As a calligrapher I mainly engage in non-modified lettering, where the first go is the only go for a word, sentence, paragraph or page. And if it doesn’t come out the way I intended I either accept the results or do it over. The lack of editing has helped me to relax and embrace a certain flow when I letter.

The tools I used for this pack include the Japanese-made pointed pen Nikko G nib (originally designed for Anime artists), German-made Haff ruling pen (originally an architectural tool) , homemade cola pen (yes, the writing tip is made out of a small piece of a Coca Cola can), various square edge brushes and the beloved American-made Sharpie.”

I want it now!

Let’s take a peek, shall we?

hand-drawn-lettering-al2l---Copy2hand-drawn-lettering-all

photoshoplayers

hand-drawn-lettering-elements-preview-2 hand-drawn-lettering-elements-preview-4 hand-drawn-lettering-elements-preview-6 hand-drawn-lettering-elements-preview-7

3 Bonus Paper Textures included!
3 Bonus Paper Textures included!

I want it now!

100 Top Resources for Typography and Hand-Lettering

100 Top Resources for Typography and Hand-Lettering

Best Typography Resources

Some of the questions we hear asked often around the design community are:

  • What is the best way to learn about typography?
  • Where do I find the best hand-lettering/type inspiration?
  • Who are your favorite letterers?
  • What are the best typography and and lettering tutorials?

We decided to pull together some of our very favorite typography and design resources for you today. Here’s what you’ll find below:

  • Some of our favorite hand-letterers and typographers (some modern day experts on type, you might say!)
  • Online educational resources
  • Awesome type and hand-lettering tutorials
  • Best sources of type and hand-lettering inspiration we’ve found
  • Super inspirational found-type collection posts
  • Books about type and hand-lettering

Off we go!

Talented folks

100 Top Resources for Typography and Hand-Lettering
Found on benjohnson.ca | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Ben Johnston

found on bryanpatricktodd.com | pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
found on bryanpatricktodd.com | pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Bryan Patrick Todd

Found on christianschwartz.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on christianschwartz.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Christian Schwartz

Cyrus Highsmith

Found on tanamachistudio.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on tanamachistudio.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Dana Tanamachi

Found on youngjerks.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on youngjerks.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Dan Cassaro

Found on darrenbooth.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on darrenbooth.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Darren Booth

Found on yourjustlucky.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on yourjustlucky.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Drew Melton

Found on erikmarinovich.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on erikmarinovich.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Erik Marinovich

Found on MyFonts.com
Found on MyFonts.com

Erik Spiekermann

Found on v4.jasonsantamaria.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on v4.jasonsantamaria.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Jason Santa Maria

Found on jessicahische.is | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on jessicahische.is | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Jessica Hische

Found on joncontino.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on joncontino.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Jon Contino

Found on kateforrester.co.uk | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on kateforrester.co.uk | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Kate Forrester

found on fromkeetra.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
found on fromkeetra.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Keetra Dean Dixon

Found on linziehunter.co.uk | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on linziehunter.co.uk | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Linzie Hunter

Found on lukelucas.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on lukelucas.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Luke Lucas

Found on martinschetzer.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on martinschetzer.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Martin Schmetzer

Found on marykatemcdevitt.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on marykatemcdevitt.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Mary Kate McDevitt

Found on moegly.tumblr.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on moegly.tumblr.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Nicholas Moegly

Found on paulshawletterdesign.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on paulshawletterdesign.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Paul Shaw

Found on ryanhamrick.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on ryanhamrick.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Ryan Hamrick

Found on seanwes.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on seanwes.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Sean McCabe

Found on seblester.co.uk | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on seblester.co.uk | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Seb Lester
Stephen Coles

Found on willco.co | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on willco.co | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Will Staehle
Alex Trochut

Online Education:

An introduction to typography: some basics from our friends at Tuts Plus
Font Shop
: Improve your design skills with typography tips and tutorials.

fontfeedlogo_11

Font Feed: is a daily dispatch of recommended fonts, typography techniques, and inspirational examples of digital type at work in the real world. Eat up.
Fonts in Use: an independent archive of typography
Designing Type Systems – a post by Peter Bilak
Learn Lettering: a course by Sean McCabe
Jessica Hische’s Thoughts: Jessica shares answers to frequently asked questions
Lettering for Designers: One Drop Cap Letterform at a Time: a Skillshare Class by Jessica Hische

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Lettering Made Simple: Efficient Methods for Custom Type: a Skillshare Class by Brandon Rike
Nice Web Type: is one place for web typography, following experiments, advancements, and best practices in typesetting web text. Handcrafted by Tim Brown

Found on seanwes.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on seanwes.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Sean McCabe’s Podcast | Recommended Resources
Stephen Coles Answers to Type Questions: 9 pages of Stephen’s answers to your burning questions about type
The First Steps of Hand Lettering: Concepts to Sketch: a Skillshare Class by Mary Kate McDevitt
Typedia: a community website to classify typefaces and educate people about them.
Understanding The Difference Between Type and Lettering: a must-read by Joseph Alessio on Smashing Magazine
Webtypography.net: the elements of typographic style applied to the web
Woodtyper: notes on large and ornamental type and related matters
Typography First: A web designer’s guide to typography

Tutorials:

Hunters & Gatherers Hand Lettering Tutorial: Techniques from Concept through Completion – on Go Media’s Arsenal

A Crash Course in Typography: The Basics of Type – on Noupe.com
A Crash Course in Typography: Paragraphs and Special Characters – on Noupe.com
A Crash Course in Typography: Principles for Combining Typefaces – on Noupe.com
A Crash Course in Typography: Pulling it All Together – on Noupe.com
DD Tutorial: From Start to Finish: from sketch to vector illustration


How to Design A Font: {Part 1} Get Inspired!
– by Katie Major on the GoMediaZine
How To Design a Font: {Part2} Draw Up A Storm! -by Katie Major on the GoMediaZine
How to Design a Font: {Part 3} Make it Digital! – by Katie Major on the GoMediaZine
How to Design a Font: {Part 4} Finishing Touches! – by Katie Major on the GoMediaZine
How to Make Any Font a Handmade Font on Creative Market
Old School Type – Line Gradients by Jeff Finley on the GoMediaZine
Ornate Lettering Process by Jeff Finley on the GoMediaZine
Typography in ten minutes on PracticalTypography.com
Vintage Typography Tutorial – by Bobby Haiqalsyah on the GoMediaZine
12 Sources of Inspiration for Creating Your Own Lettering or Typeface Designs on the Go MediaZine

Inspiration:

Found on dailydishonesty.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest

Found on dailydishonesty.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Daily Dishonesty: lovely little lies from a hungry graphic designer
Daily Drop Cap
: a font project by designer Jessica Hische
Designspiration: search found type, lettering, script, calligraphy inspiration
FontShop: Improve your design skills with typography tips & tutorials. Free downloads & goodies galore!

Found on friendsoftype.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on friendsoftype.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Friends of Type: original art for inspiration

Found on designspiration.net | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on designspiration.net | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Designspiration: a resource to help discover and share great design
I love Typography: articles, free fonts, found fonts
Fonts in Use: an independent archive of typography
Ministry of Type: a weblog by Aegir Hallmunder about type, typography, lettering & calligraphy

Found on theartofhandlettering.tumblr.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on theartofhandlettering.tumblr.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

The Art of Hand Lettering: found type on Tumblr
Typographica: Type Reviews, Books, Commentary

Read me:

pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Posts:
FOUNDFONT™ and the Art of Typographic Archaeology – on the GoMediaZine
20 Beautiful Custom Lettering Typography Designs – on BlogSpoonGraphics
30 Beautiful Hand Lettering Typography Illustrations – on BlogSpoonGraphics
40+ Excellent Hand-Lettering Inspirations – on the GoMediaZine
30 Inspiring Hand Drawn Lettering Poster Designs – on BlogSpoonGraphics
34 Inspiring Typography Designs– on the GoMediaZine
Showcase of 20 Inspiring Typography Poster Designs – on BlogSpoonGraphics
Crash Course in Hand-Lettering – How To/Tools and Tips

Books:
About Face: Reviving the Rules of Typography
An Essay on Typography
Detail In Typography
Fonts & Logos: Font Analysis, Logotype Design, Typography, Type Comparison

Getting it Right with Type by Victoria Squire
Getting it Right with Type by Victoria Squire

Getting it Right with Type: The Dos and Don’ts of Typography
Jan Tschihold, Master Typographer: His Life, Work and Legacy
Just My Type: A Book about Fonts
Letter by Letter
Logo, Font & Lettering Bible
Logotypes & Letterforms: Handlettered Logotypes and Typographic Considerations
Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age by Steven Heller, Louise Fili Reprint Edition (2012)
Stop Stealing Sheep & Find Out How Type Works, Third Edition (3rd Edition) (Graphic Design & Visual Communication Courses)
The ABC’s of Bauhaus, The Bauhaus and Design Theory
The Elements of Typographic Style
The Non-Designer’s Design Book (3rd Edition)
The Form of the Book: Essays on the Morality of Good Design (Classic Typography Series)

Thinking with Type by Ellen Lupton
Thinking with Type by Ellen Lupton

Thinking with Type, 2nd revised and expanded edition: A Critical Guide for Designers, Writers, Editors, & Students
The New Typography: A Handbook for Modern Designers (1st English translation)
The Typographic Desk Reference
Treasury of Alphabets and Lettering
Type and Typography
Type: The Secret History of Letters
Type, Volume 1: A Visual History of Typefaces and Graphic Styles
Typographie: A Manual of Design

Become a Master Designer: Rule One: Limit your fonts

rules for font use

Part One of Seven Easy Principles to Becoming a Master Designer.

Rules about Using Fonts:

Ok, “master designer” might be a bit of a stretch – but you can at least become a “proficient designer” by following 7 easy principles. This will be the shortest, most informative series of blog posts you’ve ever read on how to become a better designer. Please note: these principles CAN be broken… these are not laws, they’re just general guides that all of us designers at Cleveland design firm, Go Media, typically follow when putting together a design.

Follow these simple design principles and you’ll be on your way to artistic excellence.

Principle One: Limit Your fonts. A big part of putting together a good design, as you’ll see, is making sure the over-all look is consistent. The best way to accomplish a consistent look to your design is limiting the number