50 Totally Free Fonts for Designers 2014

Free Fonts for Designers 2014

Well hi there everyone!

One thing the fine designers at Cleveland based graphics firm Go Media knows is how important fonts are. And who doesn’t love free fonts! This post, 50 Totally Free Fonts for Designers, gives graphic and web designers a variety of new fonts. Grab these free fonts for designers 2014 now!

fonts

40 Fresh, Free Fonts for Graphic Designers

They’re super fun to download, play around with and use when appropriate. Here are some free fonts for designers 2014 that I’ve recently added to my collection. Enjoy!

Intro Condensed by Font Fabric
f8ac3ec168c00177fcc411878b16d21a

Farray by Adrien Coquet
f75cf4a5b060ccdb90a49a945079c89e

Margot by Adrià Gómez
margot

Tamoro Script on Dafont.com
tamoro_script

Bebas Neue by Font Fabric
bebas_dribbble_1x

Nord by Alex FruktaVladimir Tomin & Nord Collective
nord

Peyo by Shannon Lim
peyo

Simplifica by KAIWA
cc7a5e4e3c6cf6192759cb2375af9065

47 by Hendrick Rolandez
47---typeface-dribbble

Adam.CC Pro by Shrenik Ganatra
5f05696882b98636dd2a9d61ed230c86

Kánkin© by MRfrukta
kankin_dribbble

Glide by TypeDepot (sketch free)
glide

Gravo by Illario Strazzullo
gravo

Building by Leonardo Gubbioni
building

Archive Typeface by Fontfabric
ddd_archive

Streetwear by Artimasa
4a89b5f198da48d9c381f8aa961c4e29

Adamas Regular by Octavian Belintan
4560c02a8649ff9147f0519df02da3a0

Kaiju by Anthony James
57a28cd61bc46c7c39a302f1dce217b0

Rex by Fontfabric
rex_dribbble

Komoda by Fontm.com
Komoda-font

Hagin Serif by Fontfabric
a783945dce6ded20c55674862b5e9820

Glamour by Hendrick Rolandez
a458651312d46c8cb471a636b2426cac

California by Noe Araujo
california_1x

Nooa  by Antoine Pilette
4209e18a4eee81cef20ff13eb7f35e09

Facunda by Bu!
facunda_dribble

Lovelo Inline by Renzler Design
7e767effadef525f596dca01ccf49b9a

Jokal by Sean McCabe
jokal-dribbble

Prosto by Pavel Emelyanov and Ivan Gladkikh
629690f51ae92b15721d6bf0e4f6a749

Weston byPavel Pavlov
dd (1)

Hans Kendrick by Alfredo Marco Pradil
hans

Braxton by Fontfabric
braxton_dribbble2_1x

Barnstormer by Jonathan Heter
534604e124070f04fb6a217592d22d6c

Amende by Ike Ku
font_1x

Cube by Font Fabric
cubic_04

Nauman Regular by The Northern Block and Jonathan Hill
1df2cb2847dceee0a5fa20aeb2ae109b

Lev Serif bu Leon Hulst
Opmaak 1 kopie

New Theory by Noe Araujo
99d14fd9932b0ecd30c57aa40b9f8cef

Mathlete by Mattox Shuler
mathletedribble_1x

Muse by Nassef Khalaf
e7cbed2104e76ac47333ffa8e6496328

Zwodrei by Lukas Bischoff
b4e5003b7fbeaf99e21e7f2809d464a1

Tetra© by MRfrukta
tetra

Boomtown Deco by Chris Skillern
boomtown_display-01_1x

Corduroy Slab by Ryan Welch
cord_10_1x

Mocha Script by Thomas Ramey
mocha-script-dribble

Ostrich Sans – Heavy by Tyler Finck
os_1x

Hero by Font Fabric
hero

Native by Lori Novak
e15b03b4e2588334fa259e1fcda4515b

Drop Type by Filiz Sahin
952746a6e6953a6e9f2ecd43ded49ca8

Tiny Tim by Andrew Hochradel
TinyTim

Belmondo by TypeDepot
belmondo

Looking for more fonts are you? Go Media’s Arsenal has the perfect solution for your font addiction. Head here to grab the best of the best, including:

gma-diffraction-01-hero-shot-1270x770
Diffraction:  an experiment as to how light and type may interact with each other.

gma-bunker-01-hero-shot-1270x770
Bunker: a fusion of modern styling with a classic serif, Bunker is the culmination of form and function!

and Affliction, to name a few…!
gma-affliction-01-hero-shot-1270x770
Affliction: a vintage style font that has been put through hell. Grungy, dirty, and distressed. My heart aches just looking at it.

10 Mistakes Freelancers Make and Should Avoid Making Today

10 Mistakes Freelancers Make and Should Avoid Making Today

New freelancers can run into a myriad of problems. Without the support of a firm, freelancers hold a world of responsibility in their hands. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed right out of the gate. Some of our favorite freelancers are here to remind us that it’s only natural to make mistakes. Take note and try to learn from theirs today.

Go Media Asked, “What was the biggest mistake you made early in your career as a freelancer?”

Feeling Entitled.

The hard truth is that there are a myriad of mistakes you can make as a freelancer. We’re often drawn to this route because we have an aversion to authority in general, and people telling us how to do things. However, not having someone to tell how to do things sets us up to fall on our face over and over again. Beware of your own ignorance.

The biggest mistake that I’d like to warn up-and-coming freelancers about is Entitlement. We often get quite proud of our artistic abilities, and begin thinking that we deserve certain things, and that clients should worship the ground we walk on. The truth is that we are entering into relationships with our clients, relationships that we should focus on cultivating just as much as we focus on the work. Being a responsible, dependable, and likable person is often more important than your design skill. Resist the urges to take out your frustration on the client. Work on yourself. Be personable. No one owes you anything – it’s your job to keep client relationships enjoyable. – Brandon Rike

Blaming “Clients from Hell”

In my early days of freelancing, I used to think clients caused problems. It took me awhile to realize that this is how novices think. There’s no such thing as “Clients from hell,” because only designers from hell take on those types of clients.

Professionals seek responsibility. Every problem is the responsibility of the professional. That means every issue can be traced back to a shortcoming of the designer. It is your responsibility as the designer to ensure that there is thorough communication in the preliminary stages of the project. If a problem occurs, you need to be asking yourself how you could have prevented it. What could you have explained better? What clause could you have included in your contract that would have kept this from occurring? How can you find a way to accept responsibility for this problem? What will you do to prevent it with your next client? – Sean McCabe

Being Too Available

Looking back, I ​sometimes regret being too available.

​I was enthusiastic and eager and sometimes got taken advantage of, but more than that, I sometimes question whether I’d gotten more respect/been less scathed had I been tougher, less ready to jump in and do the work people above me would not. Those are my freelancing regrets – letting people walk over me.

I still struggle with that now I own my own business – would people respect me more if I was a little less available. At the end of the day, I just have to believe it’s OK to work it the way I work it – I just keep pushing through with the hope that my instincts + talent are enough. – Chrissy Jensen, Domestica

Not Standing Up For Myself

When I look back at some of nightmare client projects I landed as a Freelancer I now realise the main mistake I made was not standing up for myself. A lot of designers fall into the trap of being the client’s puppet, where you wind up making never ending tweaks and having the design process dictated to you. It’s important to remember that you’re the professional and the client is hiring you for your expertise, so be confident in your work and explain the reasoning behind your design decisions to avoid having your work butchered! Often you’ll find that the client will change their mind and agree with your ideas once the design theory has been explained to them, which is a win-win for both parties; they end up with great design work and you’re left with a project you’re happy to share and show off in your portfolio.

…Although sometimes the client still doesn’t care and you end up being a puppet anyway! – Chris Spooner of Blog.Spoon. Graphics

Asking for Money

I felt overwhelming guilt early on in my career about getting paid for my work. (I blame indie rock). I overcame that by studying businesses outside the creative sphere and how they handled contracting their work. It took longer than I care to admit but I finally learned the value of my work and to only deal with clients that understood that as well. I also realized being broke sucks and only stresses you to the point of not being able to produce good work or survive as a business. – Aaron Sechrist, OKPants

Not having the conversation upfront

“Very early on in my career, I was approached by a dream client: a new spa with money looking to build a unique brand. Needless to say, I was freaking out. I met with the client and talked through a scope of work. Something about this client made me feel a bit uneasy. They had taste, but hadn’t ever hired a designer before. They asked me about a budget and I told them I’d look through their requirements and get back to them. Honestly, I was a bit scared they might have really warped expectations of the cost, and as a young designer I was nervous the cost would scare away a really cool project. I just naively thought, “I’ll let my first round of logo explorations sell them on the cost”. We planned another meeting and I worked my ass off putting together a really strong first round of logos. The meeting went ok, they had a bunch of questions and were ALMOST sold on a few directions. I held off again on talking money (yeeeeesh) and scheduled another meeting to present round 2. I worked ever harder on round 2, sure that this work would make them realize they’d pay anything to have it. I sent round 2 with my final bid and waited with a sick stomach feeling like I’d lied to my parents. Of course they came back flabbergasted. Having no experience, they assumed a whole branding package couldn’t cost more than $300. My bid was somewhere around $1,500 and they thought I was crazy. It ended up just getting worse from there and we parted ways. I did a huge amount of work for free just to avoid a rough conversation up front that actually would’ve just saved me all that time and heartache. I look back and laugh at how easily I could’ve avoided this crazy situation, but also keep it as a little reminder of how not to start a project.” – Dan Christofferson, Beeteeth

Spending too much time seeking work

“I should have put less time trying to find work and more time simply creating work. For every hour I spent trolling Craigslist for random freelance gigs, I could have been sketching work for my portfolio, for sale as prints, fine art or whatever. I always felt so much pressure to justify any creative effort with the hope of a prospective paycheck, and never allowed myself the freedom to simply create, which is what I do best.” – Troy DeShano

Quoting Accurately

I noticed that for a while when a client would ask me for a cost, I would blurt out a number without taking some time to think through the design and the time it would take me to do the drawing. I think I would be worried that I wouldn’t get the job. Unfortunately I might quote them a bit low and then be angry with myself because I might not be covering all of my supplies or even taxes.

So now I usually take at least one day from the initial conversation, gather my thoughts, price out the job and make sure the cost is fair for me and the client. A great lesson learned. – Steve Knerem

Working on Spec

When I was first illustrating, a company contacted me and asked me to do work on “spec.” Spec work means any work done on a speculative basis. In other words, the client has you make work for them and there is no guarantee they will use the work or pay your for your time. In spec work you only get paid if they end up using your work. Not knowing better and wanting to take whatever work came my way, I agreed to make some designs for the company. I ended up spending hours and hours going back and forth with the company about what they wanted and adjusting my designs. I realized pretty quickly that I was in a bad situation. They were being really picky about what they wanted and I was pretty sure my designs weren’t going to get printed anyway. So I hedged my bets and decided to break the contract I’d signed with them and walk away before I wasted any more of my time working for free, even though that meant I’d never get paid work with this company again either. I also made the decision never to do work on spec again! – Lisa Congdon

…but one of the biggest mistakes just may be jumping all the way in.

Taking the Leap

I should have gone freelance way earlier than I did. – Aaron Sechrist, OKPants

_________________________________________________________

It’s your turn! What mistakes have you made early in your career as a freelancer? What are you most afraid of?

And for more on launching your freelance business:

freelanceheadergray
Click here to head to our popular post, “How to Launch Your Freelance Business: 9 Simple Tips”

An Interview with Rock Star Designer Tad Carpenter

Hello Tad Carpenter!

He’ll be the last to tell you, but for us here at Go Media, WMC Fest 3 alum Tad Carpenter is a rock star. Designer, illustrator, author and teacher, Tad balances good stuff like brand identity, packaging and book design, illustration and interactive along with his role as Professor at University of Kansas. Surrounded by design (his parents were artists and his wife Jessica a designer, too), Tad creates whimsical, smart and all-around fun for clients like Macy’s, Chronicle Books, MTV, Adobe and Hallmark Cards.

Clevelanders, be sure to catch him on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 at the next AIGA Design Speaker Series.

Now onto our chat!

Shins2_03_tadcarpenter
THE SHINS (SASQUATCH)
Poster

You’re pretty much a rock star designer in our eyes. In your opinion, why was it you who “made it”? What are characteristics that would drive someone to achieve such a status?

Complacency breeds death. I want that fire, I want the pressure, I never want to stop climbing.

I dont know how to answer that. Ha! Thank you for the compliment but I am just thankful to have work and to be doing something I love everyday. I don’t know if I have “made it” like you say. I still feel like I have so many things I want to make and so much I want to do that I’m still each day just climbing that hill. I will always be climbing that hill. The older I get at times that hill starts to feel like a mountain. I want to make more, I want to do more. The hill keeps growing. To be honest, I hope I never feel comfortable and complacent. Complacency breeds death. I want that fire, I want the pressure, I never want to stop climbing.

yeahburger04_tadcarpenter
YEAH! BURGER
Illustration, Identity, Restaurants

If you had to choose one defining moment in your career that pushed you towards notoriety, what would you say that was?

Perseverance and sweat are vastly underrated traits.

Geez, again I am not sure. I don’t know anything about notoriety to be honest. I, again, am just so happy to love what I GET to do for a living. It is important to remember we GET to do this. There sure are a lot of other professions out there and I am so lucky this one chose me. I can say this, ever since I was a little kid I wanted to be an artist, a designer, an illustrator. I got my first taste in 3rd grade and at that moment I knew this was the life I wanted to lead. I worked really hard. I still work really hard. That is what it all comes down to in my eyes, how hard do you want to work? I have never been the best draftsman, or the best with color or have the best type skills or can draw anything I look at or whatever. But I have always been willing to roll my sleeves up and work, work, work. Perseverance and sweat are vastly underrated traits.

TARGET HEARTWORK Illustration
TARGET HEARTWORK
Illustration

What is one important piece of advice you’d give a fellow designer who wanted to land a dream client, such as Hallmark – but had zero connections?

No way to fail.

Connections are important of course. I could be wrong, but to me making connections today is the easiest it has ever been. Everyone has those big pie in the sky dream clients they would love to work with. Anymore finding out their contact info is literally just a few clicks away. Never, ever be afraid to ask for something you want. If you want to work with Nike or Hallmark or Apple go make it happen. The worst that can happen is you end up exactly where you are now. No way to fail.

Have you ever broken a “rule” to get ahead in your career?

I did once go swimming 5 minutes after I ate. I regret this daily.

I also talked about Fight Club which I think might be a big no-no according to the clubs first rule.

What is your biggest fear, creatively speaking?

When I first wrote an answer down I wrote that I fear not getting any work in the future. All of it just drying up. This is a BIG fear for me but really, I would just have more time to make things for myself. That can never be taken away from you. So yes, not getting in more work and having to get a real job is a big fear but also just time passing you by scares me. I want to do this for another 70 years…can I? What will our profession be like in 10 years? 20 years? 50 years? The fear of the unknown is always present.

TRICK OR TREAT: A HAPPY HAUNTERS HALLOWEEN Illustration, Books
TRICK OR TREAT: A HAPPY HAUNTERS HALLOWEEN
Illustration, Books

What is your biggest dream, creatively speaking?

I have so many things I really want to do. A huge passion for me is writing and illustrating children’s books. I have been so lucky to work on several over the past few years. I want to keep doing this forever. My first real exposure to art (like most of us) was from children’s books. I love that maybe I, too, can inspire or get a child excited about design. That is a serious responsibility that I don’t take lightly.  Something I have always wanted to create is a clothing line. My wife and I (also a designer) have played with a few ideas over the years and I would love to work more on this one day. I love branding new start-ups too. I hope I can create more and more of these as well. Restaurants, retail, anything. It is such a rush creating a new brand and seeing the clients excitement as it comes to life.

BIKE PRINT Illustration, Prints
BIKE PRINT
Illustration, Prints

What is the biggest challenge you have faced, or face on a regular basis, to achieve success?

I guess having too many dreams, goals, work and commitments is not always a bad thing.

I am sure it is the same challenge everyone faces. Never, ever enough time. Outside of running my own studio I also teach graphic design at the University of Kansas. I love teaching. It no doubt makes me a better designer and I love working with aspiring young designers. It is so rewarding and flat out fun. But, it does add to my workload to get my “real work” completed. I feel I am pretty good with time management but could get better. I guess having too many dreams, goals, work and commitments is not always a bad thing.

For more: Tad Carpenter | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Tumblr | Flickr | Dribbble

How to Get Your Apparel Line into Retail Stores

Launching Your Apparel Line

Check out the "How to Start your own Clothing Line" section of the GoMediaZine's Start Here page
Check out the “How to Start your own Clothing Line” section of  our Start Here page

Start Here

Designed your own original and unique t-shirt, printed and branded your work, ready to launch? Now you’re ready for the big time.

For a lot of brands, the holy grail of going big-time is getting into well-known retail shops. There’s certainly an appeal to being able to go into your local mall and see your brand on the racks. How do you get there? Here are some general tips for breaking into retail, straight from Cleveland Design Agency, Go Media Partner Jeff Finley’s book, Thread’s Not Dead: The Designer’s Guide to the Apparel Industry.

Never Say Die.

Most of the successful “big-time” brands will tell you it wasn’t easy getting to where they are and that there’s no formula for success. But you’ve got to be willing to tough it out, deal with rejection, and be ready to ride the roller coaster. You must also have the capabilities to manufacture hundreds or thousands of shirts. For those wanting to go beyond the side project phase and go bigtime, read on.

Our Taking Back Sunday "Sink Into Me" Design
Our Taking Back Sunday “Sink Into Me” Design

“How to My Apparel Line into Stores,” you ask?

1.  Be Proven. Your line needs to have a history of selling well. If you consistently sell out online or have built up a large fan base online, this increases your chances of getting into a retail shop. If all you have are mockups and no history of selling anything, you need to prove yourself first. It’s like a band trying to get signed to a major label and play big shows when they can’t sell out the local pub down the street.

2. Be retail-ready. This includes hang tags, custom poly bags or packaging, printed shirt tags, etc. You need to look put-together in order to be taken seriously by retail stores. Johnny Cupcakes often reminds people at his talks that those that pay extra attention to these little details are the ones that stand out and are successful.

3. Have a line sheet or lookbook. A line sheet is basically a PDF of your t-shirt line with product info and photos of product. Include info about your brand, the names of the shirts, t-shirt color and specs, item number, prices, sizing, and other specs unique to your product.

TBS_Flash3

Don’t forget to mockup your designs.

4. Do your homework. Find out what stores you want to be in and get all the information you can about them. Make sure your brand fits the style and will look good
with the rest of the products they sell. Talk to the buyers. Find out who makes the buying decisions and set up an appointment to show them your samples. The employees at your local retail shop are not likely the ones making decisions.

5. Talk to other brands who have made it. Learn from their experience! Walk into the stores you want to be in and write down the names of the brands you find. Do your homework and look up contact information for them and introduce yourself. Be polite and see you can set up an interview with them to discuss their experiences. If you have trouble finding information about a brand, it might be because they’re a store brand under a different name. For example, I saw a brand called Aces & Eights at JCPenney once and couldn’t find a damn thing about them online. From what I gathered, it was just JCPenney putting out a line of tees under that name.

6. Go to Trade Shows like Magic or Pool. You can meet a lot of retail buyers and talk to brand owners and consumers alike. You can really get a feel for what the current trends are at these events. Eventually, setting up your own booth should be on your annual to do list. There are others like Agenda, ASR, and Threadshow.

7. Hire a Sales Rep. Find someone who has experience selling apparel to retail buyers. They do this for a living and are likely better at it than you. They also already have the contacts that everyone wants but doesn’t have. Some stores already have relationships with certain reps and buy from them often.

8. Bring samples. Retail buyers and sales reps like to be able see the actual products before they make a decision. It makes sense right? They like to feel the garment and test the quality and fit. This also gives your buyer a chance to notice all of your attention to detail!

9. Be professional yet personable. This is common sense in the industry. Buyers are attracted to people that know their product inside and out and can speak about it with passion and conviction. They buy from people they are comfortable with. If you can’t manage to clean up and persuade someone to want your tees, then get a sales rep.

10. Be persistent and follow up. When you contact a store, rep, or buyer, don’t be surprised if you don’t hear back. These people can have hundreds of brands trying to get into their store! Make a spreadsheet of all the people you are contacting and when you need to follow up. Make sure you follow up and be persistent. Just don’t be annoying and if they say no, it usually means no. Don’t nag anyone, you don’t want to damage your reputation.

Jeff's Bold is Beautiful design
Jeff’s Bold is Beautiful design

Other Options:

Sell at Local Boutiques and Consignment Shops

You can swing by your local clothing boutiques and ask if you could sell your line on consignment. The terms vary, but you only get paid if the shirts sell. The shop gets to keep a percentage. This is a good way to get your feet wet selling in stores. There’s no guarantee of making any money, but you can test the waters and get your brand name out there a little bit. You’ll need to find shops that sell to the type of consumer you are looking for. Do your tees fit in with the boutique? If you find that your tees are selling locally, then you can consider moving on to more national stores.

Sell at National Chains and Department Stores

If you want to sell your stuff at Hot Topic, H&M, or other chain stores like that, you’ll need to talk to their regional sales reps. You can find them at the major apparel trade shows looking at hot new brands to buy up. However, if you’ve got a large following online, these stores may find you through word of mouth. Urban Outfitters contacted Go Media asking to purchase a bunch of Obama skate decks that Oliver Barrett designed. We agreed on a price, signed the deal, and saw the deck in their stores. It was kind of a lucky shot there, but his design was timely and fit with what they were looking for.

Working with Distributors

Dave from Paint the Stars says, “Distributors are a great way to get your brand into places that you might not be able to reach independently.” They can also help you with manufacturing and producing your tees. Getting a distribution deal is like getting a record deal, which is one way to get more exposure and sales. Dave says he’s had good and bad experiences with distributors. “We’ve found ourselves bound by some pretty unreasonable contracts that have only benefited the distributor and left us with nothing but a bunch of empty promises.” He warns, “It’s easy to get drawn in with promises of brand exposure, marketing you never dreamed of, and crazy production. So make sure you go through every minor detail of a contract before you sign it.” Through their roller coaster experience, they have decided to start their own distribution company called Breakout Distribution to help themselves and other indie brands take it to the next level without a lot of the fine print from major distros.

tnd
Grab it:
Thread’s Not Dead: The Essential Strategy Guide for
Dominating the T-Shirt Design Business

100 Top Resources for Typography and Hand-Lettering

100 Top Resources for Typography and Hand-Lettering

Best Typography Resources

Some of the questions we hear asked often around the design community are:

  • What is the best way to learn about typography?
  • Where do I find the best hand-lettering/type inspiration?
  • Who are your favorite letterers?
  • What are the best typography and and lettering tutorials?

We decided to pull together some of our very favorite typography and design resources for you today. Here’s what you’ll find below:

  • Some of our favorite hand-letterers and typographers (some modern day experts on type, you might say!)
  • Online educational resources
  • Awesome type and hand-lettering tutorials
  • Best sources of type and hand-lettering inspiration we’ve found
  • Super inspirational found-type collection posts
  • Books about type and hand-lettering

Off we go!

Talented folks

100 Top Resources for Typography and Hand-Lettering
Found on benjohnson.ca | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Ben Johnston

found on bryanpatricktodd.com | pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
found on bryanpatricktodd.com | pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Bryan Patrick Todd

Found on christianschwartz.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on christianschwartz.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Christian Schwartz

Cyrus Highsmith

Found on tanamachistudio.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on tanamachistudio.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Dana Tanamachi

Found on youngjerks.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on youngjerks.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Dan Cassaro

Found on darrenbooth.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on darrenbooth.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Darren Booth

Found on yourjustlucky.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on yourjustlucky.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Drew Melton

Found on erikmarinovich.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on erikmarinovich.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Erik Marinovich

Found on MyFonts.com
Found on MyFonts.com

Erik Spiekermann

Found on v4.jasonsantamaria.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on v4.jasonsantamaria.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Jason Santa Maria

Found on jessicahische.is | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on jessicahische.is | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Jessica Hische

Found on joncontino.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on joncontino.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Jon Contino

Found on kateforrester.co.uk | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on kateforrester.co.uk | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Kate Forrester

found on fromkeetra.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
found on fromkeetra.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Keetra Dean Dixon

Found on linziehunter.co.uk | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on linziehunter.co.uk | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Linzie Hunter

Found on lukelucas.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on lukelucas.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Luke Lucas

Found on martinschetzer.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on martinschetzer.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Martin Schmetzer

Found on marykatemcdevitt.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on marykatemcdevitt.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Mary Kate McDevitt

Found on moegly.tumblr.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on moegly.tumblr.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Nicholas Moegly

Found on paulshawletterdesign.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on paulshawletterdesign.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Paul Shaw

Found on ryanhamrick.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on ryanhamrick.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Ryan Hamrick

Found on seanwes.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on seanwes.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Sean McCabe

Found on seblester.co.uk | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on seblester.co.uk | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Seb Lester
Stephen Coles

Found on willco.co | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on willco.co | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Will Staehle
Alex Trochut

Online Education:

An introduction to typography: some basics from our friends at Tuts Plus
Font Shop
: Improve your design skills with typography tips and tutorials.

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Font Feed: is a daily dispatch of recommended fonts, typography techniques, and inspirational examples of digital type at work in the real world. Eat up.
Fonts in Use: an independent archive of typography
Designing Type Systems – a post by Peter Bilak
Learn Lettering: a course by Sean McCabe
Jessica Hische’s Thoughts: Jessica shares answers to frequently asked questions
Lettering for Designers: One Drop Cap Letterform at a Time: a Skillshare Class by Jessica Hische

Title2
Lettering Made Simple: Efficient Methods for Custom Type: a Skillshare Class by Brandon Rike
Nice Web Type: is one place for web typography, following experiments, advancements, and best practices in typesetting web text. Handcrafted by Tim Brown

Found on seanwes.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on seanwes.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Sean McCabe’s Podcast | Recommended Resources
Stephen Coles Answers to Type Questions: 9 pages of Stephen’s answers to your burning questions about type
The First Steps of Hand Lettering: Concepts to Sketch: a Skillshare Class by Mary Kate McDevitt
Typedia: a community website to classify typefaces and educate people about them.
Understanding The Difference Between Type and Lettering: a must-read by Joseph Alessio on Smashing Magazine
Webtypography.net: the elements of typographic style applied to the web
Woodtyper: notes on large and ornamental type and related matters
Typography First: A web designer’s guide to typography

Tutorials:

Hunters & Gatherers Hand Lettering Tutorial: Techniques from Concept through Completion – on Go Media’s Arsenal

A Crash Course in Typography: The Basics of Type – on Noupe.com
A Crash Course in Typography: Paragraphs and Special Characters – on Noupe.com
A Crash Course in Typography: Principles for Combining Typefaces – on Noupe.com
A Crash Course in Typography: Pulling it All Together – on Noupe.com
DD Tutorial: From Start to Finish: from sketch to vector illustration


How to Design A Font: {Part 1} Get Inspired!
– by Katie Major on the GoMediaZine
How To Design a Font: {Part2} Draw Up A Storm! -by Katie Major on the GoMediaZine
How to Design a Font: {Part 3} Make it Digital! – by Katie Major on the GoMediaZine
How to Design a Font: {Part 4} Finishing Touches! – by Katie Major on the GoMediaZine
How to Make Any Font a Handmade Font on Creative Market
Old School Type – Line Gradients by Jeff Finley on the GoMediaZine
Ornate Lettering Process by Jeff Finley on the GoMediaZine
Typography in ten minutes on PracticalTypography.com
Vintage Typography Tutorial – by Bobby Haiqalsyah on the GoMediaZine
12 Sources of Inspiration for Creating Your Own Lettering or Typeface Designs on the Go MediaZine

Inspiration:

Found on dailydishonesty.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest

Found on dailydishonesty.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Daily Dishonesty: lovely little lies from a hungry graphic designer
Daily Drop Cap
: a font project by designer Jessica Hische
Designspiration: search found type, lettering, script, calligraphy inspiration
FontShop: Improve your design skills with typography tips & tutorials. Free downloads & goodies galore!

Found on friendsoftype.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on friendsoftype.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Friends of Type: original art for inspiration

Found on designspiration.net | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on designspiration.net | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Designspiration: a resource to help discover and share great design
I love Typography: articles, free fonts, found fonts
Fonts in Use: an independent archive of typography
Ministry of Type: a weblog by Aegir Hallmunder about type, typography, lettering & calligraphy

Found on theartofhandlettering.tumblr.com | Pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
Found on theartofhandlettering.tumblr.com | Pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

The Art of Hand Lettering: found type on Tumblr
Typographica: Type Reviews, Books, Commentary

Read me:

pinned on Go Media's Pinterest
pinned on Go Media’s Pinterest

Posts:
FOUNDFONT™ and the Art of Typographic Archaeology – on the GoMediaZine
20 Beautiful Custom Lettering Typography Designs – on BlogSpoonGraphics
30 Beautiful Hand Lettering Typography Illustrations – on BlogSpoonGraphics
40+ Excellent Hand-Lettering Inspirations – on the GoMediaZine
30 Inspiring Hand Drawn Lettering Poster Designs – on BlogSpoonGraphics
34 Inspiring Typography Designs– on the GoMediaZine
Showcase of 20 Inspiring Typography Poster Designs – on BlogSpoonGraphics
Crash Course in Hand-Lettering – How To/Tools and Tips

Books:
About Face: Reviving the Rules of Typography
An Essay on Typography
Detail In Typography
Fonts & Logos: Font Analysis, Logotype Design, Typography, Type Comparison

Getting it Right with Type by Victoria Squire
Getting it Right with Type by Victoria Squire

Getting it Right with Type: The Dos and Don’ts of Typography
Jan Tschihold, Master Typographer: His Life, Work and Legacy
Just My Type: A Book about Fonts
Letter by Letter
Logo, Font & Lettering Bible
Logotypes & Letterforms: Handlettered Logotypes and Typographic Considerations
Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age by Steven Heller, Louise Fili Reprint Edition (2012)
Stop Stealing Sheep & Find Out How Type Works, Third Edition (3rd Edition) (Graphic Design & Visual Communication Courses)
The ABC’s of Bauhaus, The Bauhaus and Design Theory
The Elements of Typographic Style
The Non-Designer’s Design Book (3rd Edition)
The Form of the Book: Essays on the Morality of Good Design (Classic Typography Series)

Thinking with Type by Ellen Lupton
Thinking with Type by Ellen Lupton

Thinking with Type, 2nd revised and expanded edition: A Critical Guide for Designers, Writers, Editors, & Students
The New Typography: A Handbook for Modern Designers (1st English translation)
The Typographic Desk Reference
Treasury of Alphabets and Lettering
Type and Typography
Type: The Secret History of Letters
Type, Volume 1: A Visual History of Typefaces and Graphic Styles
Typographie: A Manual of Design

Vector Freebie: Go Media Design Tools

It’s your lucky day.

Hey Go Media Faithful!

As many of you know, we’ve done a good bit of work to the ‘ole Go Media Storefront in the last year.

storefrontrenovation

Because of this, our very own Carly Utegg has been hard at work designing the window elements seen in heavenly “After” image above.

We love the design tools she created so very much that we’ve decided to release a vector freebie based on her designs.

Yep, just for you.

Just head over to the Arsenal and snatch ’em right up!

Hurry before it becomes a $1.00 download!

Signs You’re Doing What You Love

 (or Why I Love Go Media)

You hear a lot of this lately: Do What You Love.

Sounds easy enough, right? I’d disagree.

For me, the road to “doing what I love” has been a long and winding one.

Along the yellow brick road, I’ve racked up thousands upon thousands of dollars in college loans, gone to school far too many times (Masters x 2), spent years in job misery and have seen things in the workplace I am in contractually unable to speak of. (No, I’m not talking about you if you think I’m talking about you.)

Work, and the road to career happiness, has felt a little like hell.

When I was hired into the Go Media family, my life took a major turn. Everything fell into place. I mean, seriously. I was dropped suddenly into a land of rainbows, unicorns and strawberry cupcakes. I realized: this is it. I’m doing that thing called “doing what you love.”

Are you?

Signs you, too, are doing what you love:

Find one more person who is having more fun than us.
Find one more person who is having more fun than me.

1. You think: “My job is cooler than your job.”

There have been several years of my life where I recall avoiding small talk all together; where I avoided the ‘So, what do you do?’ and ‘Where do you work?’ chat. You know, those perfectly normal and appropriate conversations that adults have. Now, everybody I know and their brother knows of Go Media and all that we do.

In fact my Aunt Dee Dee over in Rockaway, New Jersey is probably spreading some Go Media gospel as we speak.

2. You are buying what you’re selling.

Pretty similarly, I’ve been in those positions where I’ve had to sell something, or pitch something, I didn’t believe in. I had to smile and say, “Yes, this is totally awesome” even though I’m thinking “yeah, this is totally not awesome.”

So here’s the thing: when you’re doing what you love you would actually buy that shit! It’s totally tattoo-across-your-forehead good.

3. You work more than you have to.

No more waiting in the car with Starbucks until 8:59 a.m. and dashing the hell out at 5 on the dot. I usually get in nice and early and stay later, not only because I have lots to accomplish, but because I honestly and genuinely enjoy my work.

Play is part of our day.
Play is part of our day.

Bonus points if your work is also your play.  For instance, after I’m clocked out, I stay at Go Media and get into all sorts of trouble with my colleague and partner-in-crime.

4. You work and/or network with cool folks.

I’ve worked with some gems in my life. When I say that I mean I’ve actually worked with the type who would want to call off work on a Tuesday so badly that they’d call in with a 24 hour leukemia. (I can’t make that one up.) You know, folks that would rather spin around in their chair than lift a finger.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, here at Go Media I’m interacting with people who inspire me, who push me to step up my game on a daily basis. The kind that just make me proud in general. (Same goofy folks doing weird stuff in picture above.)

5. You are making a difference.

Gone are the days of taking more than I give in return.

Here at Go Media, I am able to contribute to a community of artists and share secrets that lead to the betterment of all.

It sound cheesy, but I feel like the cool stuff Go Media does actually changes people’s lives.  And I get to be a part of it. How powerful is that?

How do you know you’re doing what you love?
Tell me in the comments below!

65+ Free Textures for Designers: Vibrant, Gritty and Otherwise Great

Well hello again.

You all know how obsessed I am with freebies by now.

fonts

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Nothing like a delicious download that costs nada, am I right or am I right?

Hold up Go Media faithful!

Let’s be honest. There’s a time and a place for everything, so having said that, a couple of things:

1. Use at your own discretion and follow the permissions set by your fellow artists. Give credit where credit is due.

2. If you want high quality textures guaranteed to make you drool, stop here. Go directly to the Arsenal.

Here you can grab texture packs like these (including some by yours truly thank-you-very-much)

Abstract Paint Texture Pack
Abstract Paint Texture Pack

I mean, come on.

Colored Smoke Texture Pack
Colored Smoke Texture Pack

Seriously!

Set 5: Complete Texture Pack
Set 5: Complete Texture Pack

Okay, okay. Enough about me.

Onto the finds!

Colortex_008_by_ISOStockColortex 8 on Deviant Art

texture_89_by_sisterslaughter165-d6n35ix

Texture 89 by Sisterslaughter on Deviant Art

grungy_square_by_mercurycode-d6nj4h0

Grungy Square by Mercurycode on Deviant Art

golden_rusty_bits_by_mercurycode-d6oyd7v

Golden Rusty Bits by Mercury Code on Deviant Art

blue_grunge_by_mercurycode-d6qavsu

Blue Grunge by Mercurycode on Deviant Art

splatters

Splatters by Kikariz-Stock on Deviant Art

leaf

Leaf Texture by Kikariz-Stock on Deviant Art

rust_texture_xix_by_mercurycode-d6pfll4

Rust Texture XIX by Mercury Code on Deviant Art

1436245_48688669

Rough Pastels 2 (SXC)

SONY DSC

Rope 1 (SXC)

texture_64_by_sisterslaughter165-d6e5k8c

Texture 64 by Sister Slaughter on Deviant Art

glass

00741 by Glass Through Skin on Deviant Art

Coffee_Texture_by_Kikariz_Stock

Coffee Texture by Kikariz-Stock on Deviant Art

Wood_Texture_by_Kikariz_Stock

Wood Texture by Kikariz-Stock on Deviant Art

wood_3_by_photoshop_stock-d49o9ht

Wood 3 by Photoshop Stock on Deviant Art

glass_texture_by_allecca-d5c82e0

Glass Texture by Alecca on Deviant Art

stock_texture___moss_on_stone_ii_by_rockgem-d72f3xy

Moss on Stone II by Rockgem on Deviant Art

psych

Psychedelic Stained Paper Texture (1 of 12) on Lost and Taken

coloredgrunge1

5 Colored Grunge Textures from our friends at Lost and Taken

texture2

Texture 2 by Dirk Wüstenhagen on Flickr

free_texture_friday_825-682x1024

Wooden Boards (1 of 5) from Stock Vault

color_wall_texture_04_by_limited_vision_stock-d54116f

Color Wall Texture 03 by Limited Vision Stock on Deviant Art

old_paint_10_by_limited_vision_stock-d3gmugm

Old Paint 10 by Limited Vision Stock on Deviant Art

cracks_09_by_limited_vision_stock-d3iwk99

Cracks 09 by Limited Stock Vision on Deviant Art

handstainedpaper14

Handstained Paper (1 of 18) on Lost and Taken

wallpaper_decay_5

Wallpaper Decay 5 by Jay Hilgert on Flickr

rubber_4_by_en11_stock-d5e1et3

Rubber 4 by en11 on Deviant Art

DSC_11043

Glass Texture on Texture King

DSC_4239

Concrete Texture on Texture King

Blue_Wave_by_GreenEyezz_stock

Blue Wave by GreenEyezz on Deviant Art

textureMAT15a1024

Texture by Mat Textureonline on Flickr

texture MAT-T3

Texture by Mat Textureonline on Flickr

rust6_edited

Rust 6 by Caleb Kimbrough on Zen Textures

fabric2_edited

Fabric by Caleb Kimbrough on Zen Textures

Bokeh4

Bokeh (1 of 4) by Shadowhouse Creations

watercolor14

Watercolor (multiple!) by Lost and Taken

6144482538_a4a89ac9ac

Scratched Rusty Metal by Caleb Kimbrough on Flickr

Untitled-1

Tears on my window by Aurora Wiendhold on Deviant Art

2691975784_5790b3dd04

Old Paper (Single) by Jay Hilgert on Flickr

38

Texture 38 by Omarsuri on Deviant Art

33

Texture 33 by Omarsuri on Deviant Art

texture_027_by_omarsuri-d49lxge

Texture 27 by Omarsuri on Deviant Art

colored_glass___daily_free_stock___001_by_aurorawienholdstock-d70h9lc

Colored glass by AuroraWienhold on Deviant Art

bluerust

Blue Rust on Stock Vault

Unaciertamirada textures 87

Unaciertamirada texture 87 by Luis Mariano González on Flickr

cracked-cement-676x901

Cracked Cement on QTextures

266

Texture 266 by Sirius-sdz on Deviant Art

21

Texture 264 by Sirius-sdz on Deviant Art

8

Distressed Wall Texture 6 by Design Instruct

shutterbug

Gary Texture by The Shutterbug Eye on Flickr

free_high_res_texture_45

Old Film from Bitbox

free_high_res_texture_30

Paint Splatters from Bitbox

26.peeling-paint-textures

Peeling Paint (multiple!) on Design Beep

Free Textures - Concrete 008

Concrete 008 by Robert Scott on Flickr

Back Camera

Childcare on Textures of Italy

texturez_3639

Free Metal Texture (Rust) from Texturez

lb1-4

Rock texture by bstocked on Deviant Art

brick_and_paint_texture_by_super_chicken_stock

Brick and paint texture by super chicken stock on Deviant Art

rust_i_by_suziart23-d74svkq

Rust by SuziArt on Deviant Art

rust_stains_by_bea_voyager-d74llhl

Rust Stains by Bea-Voyager on Deviant Art

big_water_drops_on_metal_4202178

Big Water Drops on Metal on Mayang.com

green cracks texture 31

Green cracks texture by Dirk Wüstenhagen on Flickr

Texture wt2

Texture wt2 by Angela Wolf on Flickr

Texture C 5-8-12

Texture by David Gunter on Flickr

free texture

Texture by Steve ..”Puppy Eyes” hits… on Flickr

origami

Origami Paper 36 by Alexabexis on Deviant Art

Head to Arsenal awesomeness

thearsenalheader

We collect free design tools and inspiration on Pinterest! Follow us!

pinterest-button

Learn to Code: Tips for Designers (Part 2 of 2)

Learn to Code Quick Tips

Ok, so you’re convinced. A solid grasp of some HTML/CSS and Javascript will serve you, the designer, well.

Where, then, do you begin? We asked our very own front-end developer and designer guru, Bryan Garvin, as well as friend of Go Media, web designer, developer, and founder of Girl Develop It, Jen Myers, for some tricks of the trade.

Bryan Garvin, ladies and gents...
Learn How to Code with Bryan Garvin. Beard Not Required.
Jen Myers: web designer/developer, teacher, speaker, kicks code ass
Jen Myers: web designer/developer, teacher, speaker

1. Overcome your fear.

Where to start when you’re facing what appears to be a Mount Everest of information? Jen Myers suggests that you, “start small and put it in the context of what you already know. If you work purely in graphics, practice building your mockups in HTML/CSS instead. If you are familiar with HTML/CSS, it’s not much of a stretch to start working with JavaScript. You don’t necessarily have to start with programming fundamentals and work up. In fact, most designers tend think visually and holistically, as I do, and so starting with the big picture and drilling inward can be a more comfortable way to approach code.”

Girl Develop It    Learn to Code

2. Fight stereotypes.

Let’s face it, as Jen notes, “Women are indeed the minority in the coding world, but a lot of good people are working to change that.”

How do we go about it? “The easiest way to find a supportive learning environment,” she recommends, ” is to locate one of the many organizations who offer classes aimed at women. Or, start an organization like that yourself. Three years ago, I wanted something like this and I ended up founding the Columbus, Ohio chapter of Girl Develop It, which now has sixteen chapters in different cities and more on the way. There is also RailsGirls, Railsbridge, Ladies Who Code and Women Who Code. You can also start out doing some classes online at a place like Skillcrush.

“There are also many individual women working in code today who care about improving the coding landscape and bringing more women in. Don’t be afraid to ask them for advice or mentorship. We’re all here to help each other.”

3. Recognize Life Beyond Dreamweaver.

“Many schools still push using Dreamweaver,” notes Go Media front-end developer and designer Bryan Garvin, “And sadly, a lot of those schools are using outdated versions of that software. This industry is always evolving, so attaching yourself to something that is static in time won’t give you the best path to continuing to evolve with the world around you.”

“Dreamweaver looks nice and gives you the “easy” WYSIWYG editor. I started there, so I’m not going to tell you not to open it up, play with it, and see what it does. But, at the end of the day, spending the time to learn the code instead of learning the software that creates the code will give you the ability to design and develop regardless of what device you’re working on. And, that will also give you the ability to continue to code and work with new technologies and techniques, which may or may not be supported by Dreamweaver six months after you bought it.

Go Media is primarily a PC-based company and we code all of our sites using Notepad++.

4. Learn Responsive Design, it’s the future of web coding.

“We design our sites to be responsive, therefore accessible and usable on any device. During the early wireframe/prototype phase, we walk a client through how the responsive framework we use reacts to the changing width of the viewport. We organize and prioritize every content area on a page with a client and help them understand that on a phone, people can still access all of their content, even if it looks “different” than on their PC.”

“You can read the pros and cons to moving to responsive designs and frameworks through sites like Smashing Magazine, Mashable, A List Apart, and even Forbes. But the fact is, more and more people are using devices other than a 1600px-wide monitor. And more and more people aren’t going to sites to look at your graphic design. They’re there for content. You aren’t just designing something to look at and hang on their wall. You’re designing something people can use, interact with, and experience while consuming the content that is within your design. Your design is a piece of the puzzle and should always help a user get where they want/need to go, not distract and take precedence.”

5. Create and Team up on Side Projects.

Jen has been successful learning by way of side projects.  “Usually the way I have learned, and continue to learn, new things related to coding is to create side projects that interest and engage me – and that I don’t know how to do. For example, when I wanted to learn more about building applications from back to front in Rails, I came up with an idea for an application I wanted, namely, an application to track articles and blog posts I was writing. Then the learning happened naturally as I worked to figure out how to make it and because I was excited about what I was making, I was able to stick with it. Many years ago, I first started learning HTML and CSS by creating my own personal website and that has remained my playground for testing out new skills.”

“Another trick for designers to learn code is to team up with a developer on their own side project. Most developers are eager for design help and are willing to mentor, especially in exchange for some design advice for themselves.”

6. Don’t Rely On What You’re Being Taught Now.

“One last bit of advice is to not depend on, or expect that what you’re learning in school right now will be how you’re designing and developing five years from now. Don’t be afraid to step out of that comfort zone, get cuddly with Google search, and keep your mind open to new techniques, resources, trends, and technologies. There is something new in our industry every other day. And the beauty of our industry, a lot of that ongoing education is freely available and shared from one designer and developer, to another. So get involved and get to work.”

Jen sums it up best, “Keep in mind that the world needs more coders and coders need more people with new perspectives. Not only can coding offer opportunities and benefits for your own life, you can bring experience and qualities to coding that will make it a better, more productive environment for everyone.”

Good Luck!

Get 2 Weeks Free! Sign Up Today!

Give Team Treehouse a try!

Learn to build websites, create iPhone and Android apps, code with Ruby on Rails and PHP, or start a business at TeamTreehouse – LEARN MORE!

Read More:

Designers: Learn To Code: Here’s How to Start! on Fast Co. Design by Scott Sullivan
10 Places Where Anyone Can Learn to Code on TED Blog by Jessica Gross
The 7 Best Ways to Learn to Code on Venture Beat by Devindra Hardawar
Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me When I Was Learning How to Code on Medium by Cecily Carver

More Bryan: BryanGarvin.com | SaveCleveland |
| Dribble | Google+
More Jen: Twitter | Tumblr | GitHub | Dribble | Instagram | Pinterest | Speakerdeck | Lanyrd | Ohours

An Open Letter to Design Students: Learn to Code (Part 1 of 2)

Students,

Please listen when we say this:

Learn to code.

But wait, you say, your heart pounding out of your chest: I am a designer.

I draw; I create.

I need not code.

Well my friends, listen here and listen good.

We receive resumes every day from students just like you who do what you do: Branding! Print! Illustration! Typography, too.

And, we know, we know.

Sure, it’s your portfolio that stands above the rest.

But in reality, here’s what you have to realize:

Print/Brand designers are a dime a dozen.

Even if you did a brand refresh for Apple and hand-lettered your thesis in chalk on the Great Wall, don’t be naive enough to think that code is better left to programmers.

Why learn?

One of the biggest mistakes we see in young designers is their sacrifice of design decisions simply due to a lack of understanding of code.

They’ll come to us with one design and deliver quite another. The reason, we ask as they sweat and stammer, is quite apparent.

When it comes time to code the web page, making rounded corners on your boxes is far more difficult than just having sharp 90 degree corners… so, instead of honoring their design, they just scrapped the rounded corners because they don’t know the code.

Do not fear the mystical world of unicorns and rainbows.

Embrace the concept: if you can design it, you can code it. The sky really is the limit.

Now don’t get too programmer on us. When we say code, stay true to your design self, but do get some solid training in HTML/CSS and Javascript.

This will assure that you are well-rounded and competitive in a fierce job market.

Having all of these skills in your backpocket will make you a better, more well-rounded, capable designer.  And that’s what we love to see here at Go Media.

Love, me

P.S. Read on for Part 2: Learn to Code: Tips for Designers

image2

How to Charge For Your Graphic Design Work (& Get What You Deserve)

Earn Your Worth!

To meet the author and learn more about pricing, contracts, collections and more, attend our design retreat: WMC: Off-The-Grid this October 5 -7th. For more information, head to wmcfest.com.

Over the years, we’ve had so many designers come to us and ask, “What should I charge?” Back in 2007, Bill shared A Designer’s Guide to Pricing, one of our most popular posts to date, which shares many of his thoughts on this subject. Since then, our Cleveland Design Firm has learned a lot more about pricing. And as always, we’re happy to share our latest insights with you.

Graphic Design Pricing Guidelines

Determining your fees can be tricky. There’s a fine line between too much and too little. You want to be competitively priced while also ensuring profitability (we are in business to make money, right?).

So, we wanted to not only update Bill’s post, but also share some graphic design pricing insights from our designer friends Jennifer Cirpici, Sophia Chang, Lenny Terenzi, Mike Jones and Scott Fuller.

We’re also eager to share valuable tidbits from Bill’s book, Drawn to Business, and from Go Media’s own Project Manager and Account Manager, Sarah Traxler and Lauren Prebel.

Be Where You Are by Jennifer Cirpici
Be Where You Are by Jennifer Cirpici

Choose Flat or Hourly Billing.

The first step in determining your fee structure is deciding whether a flat rate or an hourly billing system is right for your business.

Hourly Billing

Here at Go Media, we work with hourly billing (although we used to work on flat rates). As Bill notes in Drawn to Business, “At its core, our system is hourly billing. I call it “hourly billing with caveats.” If a client asks us: “How do you derive your estimates?” we will tell them: “It’s based on hourly billing rates.” But we no longer give the client a line-by-line breakdown of how we’re adding up those hours. We also stopped showing them the hours we’ve actually worked, which we used to do. Sometimes we eat hours. Clients don’t like it when you go over budget. If a client stays “on scope” and we just go over budget because we misquoted, or the client was a little pickier than we expected, we will eat a number of hours to try and close out the project on budget. I think we would be willing to eat up to 20% of the project’s hours to try and come in on budget. This puts a little pressure back on us to work efficiently and to quote accurately. However, we make sure to let our client know the value they’re getting. We’ll trumpet the fact that they just got X hours of free design services so we could stay on budget. However, if the client is going WAY over budget, then we start billing them again, but at our hourly  rate.”

In Drawn to Business, Bill stresses the importance of communicating policies before the project kicks off (even though most clients nod their head and tend to ignore the information). Putting things in writing always helps! At Go Media, that statement looks something like this:

Our quote is an estimate based on an hourly rate. If your project goes over budget we will be billing you at $XX dollars an hour. We are going to work very hard to stay on budget. Our quoting is typically very accurate, but you need to be aware of this policy.’

Now, this isn’t to say that Go Media wouldn’t work with a client who wants a flat rate. Should this be the case, we would be sure to discuss all of the project details and manage expectations at the onset.

Flat Rate Billing

Some of our designer friends who freelance prefer to bill based on a flat rate system.

Here’s a few words from Jennifer Cirpici on her billing system, “I don’t often work with hourly rates, I mostly work with fixed prices. I’ve worked with hourly rates in the past and it usually scares the clients off. They often ask for more hours to put into and in the end it’s a ridiculous amount of money I have to ask them to pay. The amount you know they won’t pay anyway. In my fixed prices I include the amount of rounds of feedback we would do, the copyright (will it be a year, two years, or a buy out? Will it be for a magazine, commercial or the web? Will they sell it to someone else? etc.), how long I think I’ll work on it and the deadline. It’s a different price when they want a project done within 24 hours or when they want me to have a lot of freedom and the deadline is in 3 months.”

Lenny Terenzi, also a freelancer, notes, “I always bill flat rate. It seems to make it easier for my clients to digest. If I go over, I go over and know to charge more next time. If I go under by a large amount I adjust the final bill to reflect that though by the time all phone calls, and email and project management and file prep and all the little things that so many people do not account for come into play, I rarely am under by much.”

On the other hand, Scott Fuller says his billing practices can ebb and flow based on the client. “I want to know, do they need X amount of options? What’s their budget? Will they still be around to pay me?”

He notes, “I’m not above charging a ‘Put Up With You’ fee. It’s important to know exactly what you’re getting into.”

Floral Print by Sophia Chang
Floral Print by Sophia Chang

Establish your rates.

At Go Media, we have different rates depending on the service. We design at $100/hour, develop at $125 and consult at $65/hour.

Queens based designer Sophia Chang structures her rates the same way, but also takes into account the type of client – “I have different pricing for graphic design, web design, illustration, consulting, project management, etc. It all varies on the client. If it’s a small start-up or big corporate gig. I can say the general hourly range is between $80-200.”

North Carolina based designer, Lenny Terenzi of Hey Monkey! Design, shares information on his fee breakdown, “Right now I calculate my project rates at $75 per hour. When I do proposals I give certain categories flat rate amounts. So for a $2,000 print / logo design project it may be:

– $300 Project Management

– $700 Creative Concepting (wireframe, sketches, etc.)

– $700 Graphic Design

– $300 File Prep and Delivery (small style guide, file formats etc.)”

Freelance designer Mike Jones, based out of Columbus, Georgia, charges between $88 and $107 per hour.

Space Vikings by William Beachy
Space Vikings by William Beachy

Know when to raise your rates.

Bill Beachy nailed it in his new book, Drawn to Business, “The easiest way to know when to raise your rates is when you’re slammed. If your design schedule is booked solid for three months and you have more requests coming in, then it’s probably time to raise your rates. This is a great way to discover your market value. Start with your rates low. Work hard until you’re slammed, raise your rates, repeat.”

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Look for a payment upfront.

At Go Media, we like to collect a security deposit before we ‘kickoff’ any project. Our policy is 50% of the project total for those under $5,000 and 25% for those over $5,000.

Jennifer Cirpici operates close to the same, “If it is a paid commission, I’ll never work without getting paid upfront. It can be 30-50% (depends). It’s just a security that the client won’t easily go to another designer and that incase the client runs away, you haven’t begun working on something for nothing.”

Mike Jones, who asks for 50% upfront, notes that this is a non-refundable deposit. This, he finds, assures that his clients stick around through project completion. Another policy he holds to is a late fee; after 90 days, Mike adds 17% to the project cost.

Find what works for you.

Smart Negotiation

Ah, negotiation – one of the most important business skills. There are countless books, seminars, webinars, etc. on the tips and techniques of negotiation. Straight from the Go Media sales team, here are a few things we’ve mastered through experience:

  • Play nice and stay calm. Remaining friendly while arguing for your side is critical for successful negotiation! Don’t insult a client (even if they have the most unrealistic or offensive demands). The last thing you want to do is damage a relationship or hinder repeat business.

  • Start high. Without being unreasonable, your first quote should be as high as possible.  As Scott Fuller puts it, “Always start high. Always. You can always go down, but it’s very hard to negotiate your price up”.

  • Know your rock bottom. At Go Media, we know our break even price and keep that in mind while negotiating!

  • Know when to slow it down. As Bill learned in his Yale School of Management course and noted in a previous post, “If you’re caught unprepared for a negotiation or are feeling confused – then stop the negotiation, take some time and re-engage in the negotiation when you’ve had some time to gather your emotions and your thoughts.”

Lenny Terenzi is Hey Monkey! Design
Lenny Terenzi is Hey Monkey! Design

Take the emotion out of quoting – be objective!

This can be hard! It’s easy to make assumptions about a client’s budget and what they can, or can’t, afford and often times adjust numbers accordingly.

As Bill notes in Drawn to Business, “It’s easy to go either way on this one. Either you’re too empathetic, worrying about your client’s budget and artificially lowering your numbers to what you think they can afford, or, if you’re greedy, you’ll artificially raise the numbers to what you want to make.”

Over the years, we’ve found that breaking down projects into as many small pieces as possible, and quoting those independently, is the easiest and most accurate way to quote.

Being objective can be extremely difficult, but it ensures profitability in the long run!

Consider responsive pricing.

“It’s easy to discount projects to appease a client and hopefully get them to ‘bite’. But random discounting without any ‘method to the madness’ can be careless. Go Media utilizes what we call the ‘Responsive Pricing System’ which determines project minimums and the max percent discount we can offer a client based on how busy we are at any given time. The goal is to have price points that respond to the current workload,” notes Lauren Prebel, Account Services Manager at Go Media. Here’s a look into the Go Media Responsive Pricing System:

  • 12 weeks or more, we offer no discounts and will only sell projects that are worth $5,000 or more.

  • Between 8–12 weeks then we’re willing to discount our rates by 20% and we’ll take any project worth $2,500 or more.

  • Between 4–8 weeks, we’re willing to discount our rates up to 40% and will take any project worth $1,000 or more.

  • Less than four weeks, we’re willing to discount our rates up to 50% and take any project worth $500 or more.

See Bill’s July 2013 post on the Responsive Pricing System for more insights!

Field Nuts by Scott Fuller at Studio Temporary
Field Nuts by Scott Fuller at Studio Temporary

Bust Bad Clients

Listen, no matter how savvy, in business, you’re going to ripped off. You have to learn how to recognize what we here at Go Media call busters, or bad clients. Once you recognize those bad clients, you must rid them from your life and business. They will only cause you headaches!

Here a few signs:

  • They’re full of energy, pumping up your ego and offering you outlandish promises. They want you to do this one-small-thing before payment. 
  • They’ll sell you on being the business partner of your dreams. You guessed it: at the end of the day, you’re doing all of the work and they’re taking all of the money.
  • They’ll play down the amount of work they need done, suggest it’s part of the current project. Sooner than later you’re in over your head. And out a whole lot of cash.

For more on identifying and avoiding bad clients head to Bill’s post on Beating Busters.

Stick to your guns.

Decide what your most important billing policies are and stick to them!

Other than the initial deposit required to ‘kickoff’ a project, Sarah Traxler, Go Media’s dedicated Project Manager, explains that our most important billing policy is the payment installment process we instituted in 2013. “At the beginning of every project, in addition to a detailed timeline, a client is given a payment schedule that identifies the dates and amount we will be billing along the course of the project. This method ensures there are no surprises regarding payment!”

Our installment documentation looks something like this:

  • 12/15 – Payment Installment no. 1 of 4: $2,125

  • 01/15 – Payment Installment no. 2 of 4: $2,125

  • 02/14 – Payment Installment no. 3 of 4: $2,125

  • 03/14 – Payment Installment no. 4 of 4: $2,125

Sarah says that this policy has really streamlined the billing process – “Whereas it previously took a long time to invoice and figure out what’s been paid, it hardly takes anytime at all now because everything has been calculated at the onset of the project. Of course, adjustments are needed here and there if a project is completed earlier or later than estimated, but that time is small in comparison to the time it used to take. It’s made things much clearer and more straightforward for the client, as well.”

Have confidence in your policies and stick to your guns!

Above all…

Ultimately, remember to maintain fairness, stick to your billing policies and have the courage to let go of the clients waving red flags in your direction.

Sophia Chang’s last piece of advice? “Don’t undersell yourself. Know your worth, do the research. And be open to making mistakes and learning from them!”

Best of luck everyone!

Let’s keep the conversation going! What works for you? Where are you meeting challenges? What questions do you have?

Do you have more questions?

We know that this post did not answer every question you have about pricing.

Here are some more resources about pricing you can hit up:

You can also submit a story idea by writing to us here. Thanks everyone!

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Lastly, make sure to check out our Arsenal Membership, which hooks you up with our huge product library for only $15 per month. Yes, seriously.

The Adventure of Art with Jon Burgerman

Jon Burgerman is not just an everyday artist. Armed with Amsterdam paints, Posca pens and Sharpies, Jon can be found at the spot where art and improvisation collide. On any given day, you can find Burgerman on the streets of New York City, doodling, drawing and delighting in art and life.  Recent works including Hot Girls and Hot Dogs, Tumblr Girls, and I Want To Eat Myself illustrate a sense of humor and talent as sprawling as his imagination.

I chatted with Burgerman, of whom I am a huge fan, about life, craft and the adventure of art.

Comfort Kills Creativity

jb4

Burgerman recalls with fond memories his studies of Fine Art at University, where he was encouraged to create without limitation. Experimenting with different forms of media, Burgerman integrated performance based art into his vocabulary.

“When I graduated, laden with debt and little idea what I was going to do with my life, I started making a variety of work which had to be quick to make and cheap. Some of this work was performance based. As my art career started to pick up I dropped out of working with my friends on events and performances. I’ve always liked the immediacy of live work and it’s something I’ve retained through-out my career. I consider my murals and drawings live works and performances even if there’s not an audience around to see them. The artwork being a documentation of the creative act.”

Recent works integrating a performance element include the Tumblr BoothMy Great Movie and The Hungry Games.

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“Recently, for a few years with my band Anxieteam and some works I’ve done on my own, I’ve purposely put live action and intervention into my practice. Live work, be it a performance, a mural, a talk, a workshop or a gig all require some degree of improvisation and fast reflexes, the great and awful thing about the ‘moment’, is not knowing what might happen next. This is equally good and bad for the performer and audience and invites a special degree of excitement to the event.

I think the live works sharpen these responses and and keep me ‘creatively fit’.”

Comfort is the killer of creativity!

Live works invite participation (although it can be unwelcome participation at times) and that connection can be really interesting. You can never really predict what people will come out with, and that can be an adventure all of its own. Comfort is the killer of creativity!”

Pieces like Game Sketch and Match, a collaborative drawing performance, and Korean Subway, reflect Burgerman’s passion, as well as his ability to play, on the job.

LK-01_660_371

“If I’m not having fun overall with a project, the project will no doubt suffer as a result. I can’t help that, it just shows in the work. When I’m inspired and have great energy the work benefits. I’m in a super lucky position where my work, my job is fun. I’m in that position because I tried as hard as I could to make it happen. There’s plenty of room for improvement, of course, but I want to have fun and live a fun life, as much is possible.”

“Play is a bit of a gamble. When you play you’re not 100% certain of the outcome. There’s parameters you have to go up against to achieve whatever it is you want to achieve, it could be a defined goal or just the act of playing. I have this in my work. When I draw there’s a number of limitations such as paper size, pen, ink, time, surface etc. I then do everything I can to achieve my invented goal. During the act of play obstacles may arise or unpredicted ‘ferret events’ may occur. Maybe you spill your paint, or someone calls your phone and interrupts you. Perhaps you run out of a certain colour, maybe you smudge a line, or the paper reacts to the ink in a certain way…  Who knows, often it’s pretty subtle things, but they all influence the work, and you adapt and navigate around them. The game starts to change as you play it. I like playing, there’s no guarantee of a particular outcome, there’s always the chance of surprises and disappointments.”

Passion and play hasn’t come about easily, Burgerman admits. As with any career, there come challenges. 

Don’t become an artist to earn money.

“The competition to be successful in the arts is really tough. You face many years without any sort of guaranteed income.  And even if you get some sort of critical acclaim that doesn’t mean you’ll be financially any better off. So one hurdle is paying your way. Don’t become an artist to earn money.”

“It can be tough carrying on when you feel like you’re not advancing. I feel this all the time but the only solution is to keep going. You become stronger because of it. You have to push yourself. It’s exactly like exercising. Each time you have to go a little further or lift a little more weight to eventually push on to the next level.”

The reward for pushing is the way Burgerman feels every time pen or brush touches paper.

jb10

How does it feel, I asked?  Burgerman answers quite vividly.

“The great Kurt Vonnegut wrote in a forward of one of his books that when he went swimming he felt beautiful, as opposed to when he was going about his day to day life. I think when I’m drawing and completely submerged within that process I feel weightless and transparent and happy. I cease to be a body, flesh and blood and grease and kneecaps, I feel like a lovely perfume emanating above a flower bed.”

Now that, my friends, is an adventure.

paint

Jon’s Burgerman shares: Supplies I Use

Amsterdam paints – I use these for quick, fast painting and even have used them on walls and the pavement in Manhattan.

Edding – I like these little pens, perfect for stowing away in your pockets for drawings on the go.

Krink – Krink go on anything, leaving a heavy, thick, gooey trail where-ever they go. These are great, a bit stinky and come from Brooklyn.

Sharpie and Pilot felt pen – These are my go-to pens for drawing in my sketchbook. Nothing is better than writing with a fresh felt pen on a blank page. The sketchbook is the place where all my ideas are born.

Posca – It can be hard to find Posca pens in America, I shipped a whole box of them over with me from Europe when I moved here. The colours are flat and solid. I use Poscas in a lot of my work, including my project Tumblr Girls

I sketch in Muji plain paper sketchbooks and have done so for over 12 years now.

More Jon: JonBurgerman.com | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook 

Handmade Love: Update

I received many kind words in regards to my recent post, Handmade Love, about my mother’s annual Christmas cards.

These cards were completed each and every Christmas beginning in 1972, the year she and my father were married, up until last year.  This year, my father, brother, sister-in-law, nieces and nephew finished the Sakai family Christmas card on her behalf, as she, the glue to our family, passed unexpectedly on October 22nd.

You can read Part One of Handmade Love here.

Since sharing her story, I have been asked to share with you each of the 42 cards in her collection.

Please enjoy and have a wonderful Christmas.

Christmas Cards by Nancy J Sakai

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1983 by Jonathan
1983 by Jonathan
1984 by Heather
1984 by Heather
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1993 by Heather
1993 by Heather
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Handmade Love

Alice: How long is forever?
White Rabbit: Sometimes, just one second.
– Lewis Carroll

It was 10:33 on October 22, 2013 when my world ended.

Ushered into a special waiting room at the Cleveland Clinic by a nurse with her head held low, my father, brother and sister-in-law knew before the team of doctors even entered the room that our worst nightmare had just come true.

The days following were a blur. Phone calls, arrangements, trips to the airport to pick up family flying in. Standing at the calling hours we stood in a row, stunned.

One by one they came in. Friends and relatives, packing the room for hours. These people who were touched by my mom’s contribution to each and everyone of their lives. Each had a story about her kindness, her gentle way.  As they hugged me, shedding tears and apologizing for all that we had lost, smiles crossed so many faces as they shared this one consistent message, “Heather, I want you to know that I kept each and every one of your mother’s Christmas cards.”

Ten, then twenty, then over one hundred people, I learned, had been amassing my mother’s homemade Christmas cards since she had been sending them in 1972, the year she and my father were married.

first christmas card | 1972
first christmas card | 1972

It was sweet, yet not surprising to me.  As long as I can remember, my mother would sit at her desk for hours upon end, beginning every year in early October, in order to craft each and every one of her around 125 annual Christmas cards.  Each was created with extreme artistry, patience and an eye for detail beyond my ability to comprehend.  Each was made by way of a different medium, including origami, bent wire, stamp, embossing, watercolor, hand stitching. She made her own paper and hand lettered each and every envelope.

Anything less than perfection was inexcusable for my mom; many cards ended up in the trash. We’d always joke about her perfectionism, get on her about how the ones with color outside the lines were good enough. She’d always shake her head.  She wanted each of those cards to be just right for all of her friends and family who she loved so very much.

origami | 2011
origami | 2011
embossing, handmade paper | 2002
embossing, handmade paper | 2002
wirebending | 2009
wirebending | 2009
cell painting | 1988
cell painting | 1988

My mom created a book of all of her 39 cards, one for my brother, and one for me. What you see here is just a small sampling of her work. This year we’ll be assembling the last Christmas card she created with the bits and pieces she’d begun to work on early, like always. We imagine her looking down, gasping at our messiness as type is misaligned and rubber cement leaves tracings of gummy on paper.

watercolor painting | 2000
watercolor painting | 2000
hand stitching | 2007
hand stitching | 2007

It’s almost incomprehensible to me that this Christmas will go on without her. That life is going on without her.  That there is a world without my mother, my best friend, who touched so many lives with a spirit reflected in these cards: beautiful, meticulous and full of love.

| See all of her cards here |

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All cards created by Nancy J. Sakai, beloved mother of Heather

50 Vintage Freebies for Designers

Vintage Freebies for Designers

Hello!

You all know, I’m a sucker for freebies. Add “vintage” to the mix and well, I’m totally geeked out.  I hope you enjoy these vintage finds – not only fonts, but also badges, frames, PSD retro layer styles and icons!

As always, please pay attention to the license on each freebie!

Vintage Fonts

Matchbook Typeface by One by Four. Matchbook & Matchbook Serif available for free download
Matchbook Typeface by One by Four. Matchbook & Matchbook Serif available for free download
Molesk, free vintage font by Pedro Lobo
Molesk, free vintage font by Pedro Lobo
Hand Shop Typography 30, free font available on dafont.com
Hand Shop Typography 30, free font available on dafont.com
Nashville by Disturbed Type on FontSpace
Nashville by Disturbed Type on FontSpace
My Underwood by Tension Type on Font Space
My Underwood by Tension Type on Font Space
Old Photograph Credit seen on dafont.com
Old Photograph Credit seen on dafont.com
Antique Book Cover found on dafont.com
Antique Book Cover found on dafont.com
Super Retro seen on dafont.com
Super Retro seen on dafont.com
Recorda Script by Måns Grebäck seen on Font Space
Recorda Script by Måns Grebäck seen on Font Space
CF Paris seen on dafont.com
CF Paris seen on dafont.com
Upper East Side by David Rakowski on Font Squirrel
Upper East Side by David Rakowski on Font Squirrel
CF Historia seen on dafont.com
CF Historia seen on dafont.com
Riesling found on Font Squirrel
Riesling found on Font Squirrel
Governer by Riley Cran on Lost Type
Governer by Riley Cran on Lost Type
The Dreamer by Billy Argel on Font Space
The Dreamer by Billy Argel on Font Space
Hustlers Rough Demo Font by Decade Type Foundry
Hustlers Rough Demo Font by Decade Type Foundry
American Brewery Rough Font by Decade Type Foundry seen on Font Space
American Brewery Rough Font by Decade Type Foundry seen on Font Space

Badges and Frames

Calligraphic Frames, Soft Font by Intellecta Design
Calligraphic Frames, Soft Font by Intellecta Design
Vintage Banner, Coffee Shop on Freepik
Vintage Banner, Coffee Shop on Freepik
Retro Badges by Aurove Design Studio
Retro Badges by Aurove Design Studio
Authentic Labels Demo by Decade Type Foundry seen on Font Space
Authentic Labels Demo by Decade Type Foundry seen on Font Space
Neoclassic Fleurons by Intellecta Design seen on Font Space
Neoclassic Fleurons by Intellecta Design seen on Font Space
PSD Modern Vintage Stickers / Badges by Pixeden
PSD Modern Vintage Stickers / Badges by Pixeden
Chalkboard Style Vintage Badge by Sztuchlak Gergő seen on Behance
Chalkboard Style Vintage Badge by Sztuchlak Gergő seen on Behance
Chocolate Vector Badges
Chocolate Vector Badges
5 Photo Neat Retro Badges (PSD) by BluGraphic
5 Photo Neat Retro Badges (PSD) by BluGraphic

Photoshop Retro Layer Styles

Photoshop Retro Layer Style by Aurove Design Studio
Photoshop Retro Layer Style by Aurove Design Studio
Retro Vintage Layer Styles on Creative Market
Retro Vintage Layer Styles on Creative Market
Old School Retro Psd Text Effect by Pixeden
Old School Retro Psd Text Effect by Pixeden
Vintage Retro Styles on Creative Market
Vintage Retro Styles on Creative Market

Icons & Extras

Vintage Letterpress Texture Pack Extras
Vintage Letterpress Texture Pack Extras
Free Vintage Icon Set by Julian Hrankov seen on Dribbble
Free Vintage Icon Set by Julian Hrankov seen on Dribbble
Free Vintage Design Icons seen on Design Contest
Free Vintage Design Icons seen on Design Contest
Retro Icon Set found on Pixel Pixel Pixel
Retro Icon Set found on Pixel Pixel Pixel
Free Retro Icons pack on We Sell Design
Free Retro Icons pack on We Sell Design
Retro Candy: Free Icon Set by Jan Cavan seen on Six Revisions
Retro Candy: Free Icon Set by Jan Cavan seen on Six Revisions
Aged-Type
Aged Type Effect Photoshop Action by Go Media

Texture Packs

Vintage Book Texture Elements on Lost and Taken
19 Vintage Book Texture Elements on Lost and Taken
Vintage Texture Pack (set of 5) on Deviant Art
Vintage Texture Pack (set of 5) on Deviant Art
Vintage II Texture Pack (set of 12) on Deviant Art
Vintage II Texture Pack (set of 12) on Deviant Art
Vintage III (set of 8) on Deviant Art
Vintage III (set of 8) on Deviant Art
Vintage IV Texture Pack (set of 9) on Deviant Art
Vintage IV Texture Pack (set of 9) on Deviant Art
14 Free Vintage Film Textures on Lost and Taken
14 Free Vintage Film Textures on Lost and Taken
Vintage paper Texture Pack on Deviant Art
Vintage paper Texture Pack on Deviant Art
Vintage Book Textures on Pixel Pixel Pixel
Vintage Book Textures on Pixel Pixel Pixel
Crumpled Paper Textures (10) seen by Radu Luchian
Crumpled Paper Textures (10) seen by Radu Luchian
Textures by Last Sunday on Deviant Art
Textures by Last Sunday on Deviant Art
9 Paper Texture Pack on Deviant Art
9 Paper Texture Pack on Deviant Art
9 Vignetted Vintage Paper Textures
9 Vignetted Vintage Paper Textures
Colored Vintage Paper Texture Pack on Design Instruct
Colored Vintage Paper Texture Pack on Design Instruct

I Want More!

Craving more vintage action in your life? You’re in luck! We’ve got some more tools in our Arsenal to satisfy your every need.

Vintage Elements Vector Pack
Vintage Elements Vector Pack

Oh, here it is. The pot of vintage gold, aged to perfection, dusted with rainbow bits. 37 knotted puzzles of retro vector flexibility. Click on the image and view the image gallery for close-ups!

Vintage Stamp Effect Photoshop Action
Vintage Stamp Effect Photoshop Action

Works great on any single color logo, emblem, mark, seal, crest. Because of the great response to Jeff Finley’s Aged Type action, he took it a bit further and made a similar effect that could be applied not just to text, but to your logo to give it an authentic stamp or print effect.

best poster design

Poster Design: 50 Excellent Inspirations

Best Poster Design

Hey designers, want way more inspiration? Attend our all-inclusive soul-fulfilling three-day design retreat, WMC: Off-The-Grid, this October 5 – 7th. To learn more, head to wmcfest.com.

Need some poster design inspiration?  You’ve come to the right place. We’ve gathered some good ones to get your creative juices flowing.

Once you’ve been inspired, head over to Mockup Everything to give your design a go on one of our free mockup templates, like this one:

Poster with Hands

Make sure to share your work with us!

Enjoy!

Poster by dragana nikolić
Poster by dragana nikolić
Poster by Hedof
Poster by Hedof
Poster by Klaudia Kost
Poster by Klaudia Kost
Work Hard by Martín Azambuja
Work Hard by Martín Azambuja
Have you Ever Been To by Federica Bonfanti
Have you Ever Been To by Federica Bonfanti
The Decemberists, w/ Heartless Bastards poster by Strawberry Luna
The Decemberists, w/ Heartless Bastards poster by Strawberry Luna
Poster by Bartosz Szymkiewicz
Poster by Bartosz Szymkiewicz
Motion Theater by Caroline Grohs
Motion Theater by Caroline Grohs
Little Red Riding Hood poster by Christian Jackson
Little Red Riding Hood poster by Christian Jackson
MTV Poster by Frederik Samuel
MTV Poster by Frederik Samuel
Superman poster by James White
Superman poster by James White
Empire of the Sun poster by Michal Krasnopolski
Empire of the Sun poster by Michal Krasnopolski
Moonrise Kingdom poster by Alizée Lafon
Moonrise Kingdom poster by Alizée Lafon
Museum of Childhood Play to Learn poster
Museum of Childhood Play to Learn poster
Phish "Blossom Music Center" Poster by DKNG Design + Illustration
Phish “Blossom Music Center” Poster by DKNG Design + Illustration
The Swell Season Gig Poster
The Swell Season Gig Poster
Russian Red at Union Chapel Poster
Russian Red at Union Chapel Poster
Simian Mobile Disco Poster
Simian Mobile Disco Poster
Old Crow Medicine Show Poster
Old Crow Medicine Show Poster
Dexter Poster by Albert Exergian
Dexter Poster by Albert Exergian
Solo Heads poster by Aldo Crusher
Solo Heads poster by Aldo Crusher
Skillnet Poster by Steve Simpson
Skillnet Poster by Steve Simpson
10 Principles of Good Design poster by Gerren Lamson
10 Principles of Good Design poster by Gerren Lamson
Noah and the Whale poster by Matt Jones
Noah and the Whale poster by Matt Jones
Poster by atelier martino&jaña
Poster by atelier martino&jaña
Will Johnson poster by Robert Lin
Will Johnson poster by Robert Lin
Ghost Writer by Hubert Tereszkiewicz
Ghost Writer by Hubert Tereszkiewicz
Tin Pan South poster
Tin Pan South poster
Money Poster by Graziano Losa
Money Poster by Graziano Losa
Poster by Dr. Alderete
Poster by Dr. Alderete
Helio Sequence by Karen Kurycki
Helio Sequence by Karen Kurycki
Poster by Austin Sellers
Poster by Austin Sellers
Parachute Journalists - Dark Side by Jeff Finley
Parachute Journalists – Dark Side by Jeff Finley
Ariel Pink's Haunted Graffiti by Mikey Burton
Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti by Mikey Burton
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Rocco Designs
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Rocco Designs
Such Great Heights by Garrett DeRossett
Such Great Heights by Garrett DeRossett
Jeff Tweedy Three Color Screen Print by Path Poster Designs
Jeff Tweedy Three Color Screen Print by Path Poster Designs
Supa 9 by Dziugas Valancauskas
Supa 9 by Dziugas Valancauskas
Poster by Andrey Smirny
Poster by Andrey Smirny
Better than Nothing poster
Better than Nothing poster
Metafisico by Manuel Dall'olio
Metafisico by Manuel Dall’olio
Melbourne Dance Company Poster
Melbourne Dance Company Poster
Tour Poster by Sergio Membrillas
Tour Poster by Sergio Membrillas
Helvetica Poster by William Xu
Helvetica Poster by William Xu
Laneway Festival poster
Laneway Festival poster
Poster by Tom Davie
Poster by Tom Davie
Poster by Slawek Michalt
Poster by Slawek Michalt
poster4
Poster by Dominik Bubel
Coca-Cola poster
Coca-Cola poster
Black Swan by LaBoca
Black Swan by LaBoca

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