Top Social Media Hashtags for Designers

How Designers Use Social Media

How These Designers Used Social Media to Expand Their Reach, Take On the World

How Designers Use Social Media

These days, you can’t go anywhere without noticing someone staring at their phone, laptop or tablet. Most of the time spent on these beloved devices is on social media like Instagram and Facebook. Social media runs a large part of the public’s everyday lives and many choices are made by the content they see. Why not use social media to your advantage as a designer to get your work out to more prospective clients? Here are some designers who took to the web in order to broaden their reach and made a name for themselves in cyberspace:

joanna zhou photo

Youtube isn’t just for gamers

Joanna Zhou, who goes by Maqaroon on Youtube, is a professional illustrator/designer based in Austria. She first created a Youtube account in 2011 to build a following and gain exposure for her budding online shop. When she started posting videos in 2013, she had little to no experience in the online world and how to create a niche for herself. But, two years later, her YouTube account has become a hub for all things girly “Do-It-Yourself”. With 208,296 subscribers and 10,444,514 total views in two years, Joanna became the most successful Youtuber in Austria, now partners with Tastemade and has 22.5k Instagram followers. Since her online exposure, she has been featured in magazines like Cosmopolitan.

lolly wolly doodle photo

Homemaker to Facebook extraordinaire

Facebook isn’t just for friending anymore. Many people spend their time liking, sharing and commenting their little fingers off. What most people don’t consider are the business benefits available to you because of it. Homemaker turned designer, Brandi Temple, made a name for herself on Facebook. Now the CEO for Lolly Wolly Doodle, a clothing company for children, Brandi created an empire overnight with her designs. She originally started by just posting clothing designs on Facebook and selling to friends. Now a full-fledged company, Lolly Wolly Doodle uses their Facebook page to let fans know about deals, sales and upcoming seasonal lines. What started as a homemaker’s hobby in 2009 turned to a startup conquering Facebook sales, Lolly Wolly Doodle boasts over 1.1m likes, made $11 million in 2013 and has been featured in The Business Journal many times.

Instagram first….then the World
Instagram is one of the newer social media platforms, at least compared to Facebook, Youtube and Twitter. Originating in 2010, the social media app focuses on sharing photos and short videos with your following and allowing them to like and comment on them. Below are two artists who took this app to the next level and used it to not only showcase their hard work but even get them the exposure of their dreams!

mike kus photo

Designer and photographer, Mike Kus, turned his Instagram in a mobile on-the-go portfolio. Boasting a whopping 859k followers and 1,461 posts, Mike uses the app for traditional social media purposes and also keeping fans and clients up to date with progress. Since he was one of the early adopters of the app, he also found himself at the forefront of a budding phenomenon. Instagram featured him as a suggested user for other users to follow and offers started pouring in. Some of these projects include being approached by the clothing company Burberry to shoot them backstage at London Fashion Week 2011 and to shoot for the European cell phone company O2. Using the social media app, he shows off his finished projects with hints on where to pick them up. Mike has also worked with HP Europe and Techné Watches, and posted mockups and photos of the designs to his Instagram followers.

Maura Photo

Instagram was what sealed the deal for young designer and illustrator, Maura Creighton. Currently majoring in Arts Management and minoring in Design at Chatham University in Pittsburgh, Maura gained notoriety on social medias for her art and designs. What started out as a hobby for Maura, turned into something she found could make her money online. Her exposure on Instagram allowed the creator of the clothing brand Anthem Made, Kellin Quinn, to contact her on the app after seeing some of her work to create two designs for the Summer and Fall 2014 lines for the company. After her stint with Anthem Made, she was commissioned to make t-shirt design for the band Man Overboard. Since then, she has gained a following and commissions designs straight from her Instagram for those who are interested and constantly updates her followers with designs that are in progress.

Interactive Webcomics

Not only are comic books a very popular endeavor as of late, but some designers have found notoriety on the web for their stories. Web-comics came to be a gold-mine for Andrew Hussie, who created the popular hub of MS Paint Adventures. MS Paint Adventures houses his four series, which are Jail Break, Bard Quest, Problem Sleuth and most famously Homestuck.

homestuck photo

The use of the online platform not only allowed Andrew to get his work out to a larger audience but also employ different design techniques like GIFs, Flash plug-ins and music to make his comics come to life and capture readers. The popularity has grown so large that Andrew’s Homestuck has merchandise in Hot Topic.

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Whether you use any of the social medias listed above or another one entirely–they are an important tool to consider. Using social media in a technology driven world like ours to create a name for yourself is one of the more clever business moves to make. Just because your accounts are online, you can still promote yourself in person with Favicards. The above designers took to the web to not only promote themselves but also get their designs to the masses and you can do the same.

The Thank You Economy – In Depth Review

The Thank You Economy

My name is Marissa Mele.  Many of you probably don’t realize that you already know me.  I am the person that answers your tweets on Twitter, comments on your posts on Facebook, and repins the awesome pictures you find on Pinterest.  So you see in some ways we know each other. Now I have had years of experience with social media, but it wasn’t until starting my job at Go Media that I had the opportunity to hone my skills in a professional setting. So as the months passed, and I read more and more about the power of Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest to help grow a business, I decided it was time to read what the experts had to say on the matter. I wanted to see if my instincts were right and that I was on the right track. I spoke to Jeff and he recommended some books, one of which was Gary Vaynerchuk’sThe Thank You Economy.”

Developing & Fostering Customer Relationships

This 5 part book discusses why businesses have to be and need to be on social media platforms, how to effectively structure messages on these platforms, and how we all need to get back to our grandparents way of doing business: developing and fostering customer relationships.

According to Vanyerchuk, “There is financial gain for any size company that is willing to open the lines of communication with its customers and market to them in a personal, caring way that makes them feel valued.”  Like the business owners of yesteryear, we all need to care more, and not about just our bottom line (although that should always be in our rear view), but about making meaningful connections with our customers.  We can’t be afraid to expose our hearts and souls, and we have to show that we care about each and every one of our customers.

“There is financial gain for any size company that is willing to open the lines of communication with its customers and market to them in a personal, caring way that makes them feel valued.”

The Need for Businesses to Shift Back to the Good Ol’ Days

Business has shifted in the last 30 years.  Many of us aren’t old enough to remember the good ol’ days, but we all can remember the stories our parents and grandparents tell us about how things used to be.  Vanyerchuk reminisces about the services businesses used to offer like baggers that brought your groceries to your car or gas station attendants that filled the tank for you (well, except you, New Jersey).  Wouldn’t it be nice to have those things again?  Wouldn’t it be nice for a business owner to care that you had a bad experience, instead of dismissing your complaint because you aren’t important or impactful enough to affect their bottom line?  I think the answer is we all want some old fashioned manners to creep back into the consciousness of business owners.  Vaynerchuk tells us, “What pays off most is your willingness to show people that you care about them, about their experience with you, about their business.”

How Social Media Sites Give Consumers a Voice

We have all been subjected to bad service at one time or another.  Maybe it was a rude hostess at a restaurant or a dismissive clerk at a retail store.  Many of us can even recall with great detail these interactions and have no problem voicing them loudly to our friends.  Before the Internet, these bad interactions were only shared with the people who were around us physically or with a person that was a phone call away, so business owners could slough off a few bad interactions as their reach was only a few people wide.  Now with sites like Yelp, Urban Spoon, Trip Advisor, etc. people have a sounding board to voice their complaints and those bad interactions can now reach to the farthest stretches of the world.  And those sites aren’t the only ones that house these complaints; Facebook and Twitter with its billions of users aren’t keeping quiet about their horrible reactions to your business or product.

The Power of the “Like”

Vanyerchuk tells us that “when given the choice, people will always spend their time around people they like” and that “more and more people are making business and consumer decisions based on what they see talked about on social media platforms.”  Now doesn’t it seem silly that these business owners are dismissing the power of social media?  As a business owner you need to be on the forefront of these complaints, putting out the fire and rectifying the situation.  Sometimes that means offering your services or product for free, but more often than not, a “thank you” or a heartfelt “sorry” can fix the situation for you.  However, under no circumstances is it appropriate to berate the complaining customer, that is very opposite of the “Thank You Economy.”

How to Value the Importance of Customer Feedback on Social Media Channels

There are many ways that “The Thank You Economy” direct business owners to better handle difficult business situations and how to value the importance of customer feedback on social media channels:

  1.  “Valuing every single customer is mandatory.”
  2. “All businesses need to start treating their customers as though they are big spenders.”
  3. “[Business owner] is going to have to do their damndest to shape the word of mouth that circulates about them by treating each customer as though he or she were the most important customer in the world.”
  4.  “Only companies that can figure out how to mind their manners in a very old fashioned way – and do it authentically are going to have a prayer of competing.”
  5. “Social media allows us to get fresh, visceral, real-time feedback, not stale focus-group opinions.”

Now let’s break this list down.

Valuing Every Single Customer Is Mandatory

Numbers 1 & 2 go hand in hand.  Every business owner must treat each interaction as if they were their highest paying customer.  And you know what, they might be.  What if a company like Adobe pissed off the AIGA?  Would AIGA recommend their products?  Not likely.  If you don’t treat each person with respect and feel genuine concern for their complaints, chances are you might lose their business.  And what if that business is 10% of your revenue or 50%?  Could you afford to lose that business now?  Chances are “no” you can’t afford to lose that kind of $$$.  The only smart answer then is to treat each customer like they are your highest spending customers.  Treat them like kings/queens, lay out the red carpet, and speak to them like they matter.  If you do this, you are guaranteed to not lose major income because of bad customer service and interactions.

Shaping the Word of Mouth

Number 3 demonstrates how you can have control over what is being said about your business by following numbers 1 & 2.  If you follow the first 2 items on the list, then people are going to trust you more, care about you more, and tell their friends/family about you more.  Hasn’t there ever been a time in your life, when you were given incredible customer service?  I think most of us are primed and ready for someone to be rude to us.  We’ve all called a customer service number after running into an issue or problem, and we probably had to spend a good 20 minutes scouring the site for a number to call, knowing an email complaint is going to take too long to hear a response.  After we find the number, we have to sit through a series of prompts, pressing button after button, until finally, if we are lucky, we get to talk to an actual person.  By that time, we are frustrated and are greeted with a canned “hello, my name is _____, how can I assist you.”  We try to describe our issue and are usually told we are contacting the wrong department and have to be transferred.  Of course, the transfer fails and you are left hearing this noise, and have to hang up and start all over again.

Customer Service Comes In Many Shapes & Sizes

Now on the flip side, excellent customer service comes in many shapes and sizes.  Maybe you were offered a free “something”, maybe they gave you a priority membership, or maybe all they did was sincerely care about your issues and talked to you kindly and not like you were bothering them.  Nothing is worse than calling a customer service number and the person who is on the other line acts like you are interrupting them.  Customer Service professionals might seem like they are a dime a dozen, and maybe they are, but not all are created equal.  Over the course of my time here at Go Media, there have been a few instances where customers needed support.  Go Media lady, Kim Finley to the rescue!  She is a rockstar when it comes to dealing with customer support issues (well, and really anything she has her hands in).  She never raises her voice, she never loses her cool, and she never ever treats the person on the line like they are “less than” or disrespects them in any way.  Kim knows how the “Thank You Economy” works and ensures that any issue, however minor, will get her full attention and she will do everything in her power to resolve the problem.

Old Fashioned Manners

Number 4 reminds us to mind our manners.  Please, thank you, you’re welcome, how can I help you, sir, and ma’am: these are the words and phrases to tattoo on your brain when you are dealing with customers.  Pretend it’s the 1950s, address each customer by their name, offer your condolences when they are frustrated with a concern, and express that you are happy to hear from them and that you are there to help.  I am a southern girl.  My mom is a southern woman.  If you are from the south, you know the importance of having good manners.  You’ll get run out of town if you don’t remember your manners words.  I think many people have forgotten how to do little things like say please and thank you.  How many times have you gone out of your way to do something nice for a stranger and they can’t even muster the words “thank you?”  It’s annoying, it pisses you off.  The lack of manners is ruining relationships not only with strangers but with customers.  Why would you shop at a store where you are treated like crap?  No one wants to spend their hard-earned money in businesses that don’t value their customers.  I know I won’t.  If you treat me like you are too good to be nice to me or that I am not the right kind of customer for your establishment, well, then I am too good to hand you my money.

Real-Time Feedback, Not Stale Focus-Group Opinions

Finally, number 5; this item shows us that any feedback we receive on social media channels like Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, etc. is FREE.  And if it’s free, it’s me.  As it should be for all of you.  Why spend thousands upon thousands of dollars on focus groups?  That takes a ton of money, energy, and manpower.  When all you have to do is pay attention to what is being said in the social media sphere.  What if Suzie from Salt Lake City, UT said, “Ugh, the hostess at [fill in the name of your restaurant here] was so rude to me.  I’m never going back there again.”  When you saw that hostess again, would you look at her the same way?  Would you possibly watch how they interact with customers?  Now the hostess might have had an off night, but it could also be that the hostess isn’t the right person to be at the forefront of your business, greeting clients and such.  It might be time to let the hostess go or reassign them to a position they are better suited for.

Examples

On the other hand, what if Jack from Madison, WI says, “I love the product you offer, but when I am using it I run into these problems…”  You didn’t have to hold a focus group and spend months of time preparing to survey your customers.  They are right there, offering their opinions for free.  All you have to do is open your ears, your eyes, and your minds, and the only way to do that is to jump in head-first to the social media waters.  The water may be cold at times, but nothing can be gained from non-participation.

“There are only 2 things that will convince consumers to pay more for something when they could pay less.  One is convenience, and the other is an outstanding customer experience.”

One of the tenets of Gary Vaynerchuk’s book that really stuck out for me was, “There are only 2 things that will convince consumers to pay more for something when they could pay less.  One is convenience, and the other is an outstanding customer experience.”  I have been thinking a great deal about this concept and realize that in my own consumer behavior I often will pay more for a better experience.  Recently I was at the Steelyard in Cleveland, OH.  The Steelyard is a shopping center with many of the box stores and they have both a Target and a Walmart.  Below is a breakdown of some of the basic differences between these 2 stores.

Target vs. Walmart

Target is:

  • Clean
  • Organized
  • Bright and vibrant
  • Their employees are friendly and helpful
  • Creative advertising

Walmart is:

  • Messy
  • Cluttered
  • Dark and dingy
  • Their employees aren’t usually helpful or accommodating
  • Bland advertising

Convenience & Customer Experience

Now both of these stores are in the same shopping center so the convenience factor is the same.  Therefore the mitigating factor is the customer experience.  So how come, I (and I am sure many of you) would prefer to shop at Target?  The answer is because Target offers a better customer experience.

The customer experience isn’t just for brick-and-mortar stores; it also applies to ecommerce stores as well.  Shopping online is convenient as all heck, but we all know that there are ecommerce stores that do not provide a good customer experience.  When sites aren’t easy to navigate, when there are system failures, and when customer service numbers are impossible to find on the site or when you do find them that the person on the other line isn’t a “real” person or if they are a flesh-and-blood human that they treat you like dirt.  These are all ways in which the customer experience with online shopping can affect customer behavior.

Go Media’s Ecommerce Store – The Arsenal

Here at Go Media, we have an ecommerce store called the Arsenal.  The Arsenal sells design products and tools to design students and professionals alike.  There have been many iterations of the site and we are currently working on a complete redesign.  The process is ongoing and what contributes to that is our customer feedback.  We are committed to providing an excellent customer experience so when someone calls saying that they are a customer in Singapore and the download link isn’t loading, we look at the issues they might be having and realize we need to host our files on a different cloud server so that people in foreign countries can easily download our products.  Or when we receive customer feedback and they say that they would like to buy one of our products but aren’t sure how it could be of use to them, we create a video tutorial on how to use the product.  So you see we are constantly and consistently improving the process and experience so that after people make purchases at our site, they are satisfied and would want to shop with us again.

Stop Finding Excuses Not to Change

People always find excuses for not changing.  Staying stagnant can cause you to be the last person in the race.  When businesses refuse to adopt new marketing and sales techniques they can be left in the dust by companies that are willing to innovate and improve their processes.  So if you are a business owner who doesn’t believe in the power of social media to drive sales and increase your brand power, take a look at the data and graphs throughout this post; I am positive you will be convinced once you see the numbers.

Now This Is Where You Come In

I would be remiss if I didn’t reach out to all of you to ask how we can make your customer experience better. What sort of products would you like to see more of on the Go Media Arsenal? What makes for a great customer experience in your opinion? What sort of great experiences have you had in the past when working with design companies? Tell me about them, I would LOVE to hear from you so email me at [email protected] or give me a call at (216)939-0000 ext 337.

Links

Create A Vector Art Twitter Bird Character Icon In Adobe Illustrator

twitter-bird-final-preview

Twitter is quite a social media juggernaut as of late. It’s getting to the point that one has to have a Twitter account. And what good is a Twitter account without a link to it? And what better way to link to your Twitter account than with a cool blue bird character illustration? This tutorial will walk you through the steps from sketch to vector in creating an original cartoon-style character vector illustration.

I currently work in Adobe Illustrator CS4, but most of the steps here can be retro-fitted to earlier version of Adobe Illustrator — or to alternate vector art graphics software. This tutorial also assumes you have a working knowledge of Adobe Illustrator, the basics of creating vector paths using the pen tool, and the basic vector art tools. What follows is a walkthrough of a method to go about creating cartoon-style illustrations in vector art giving them a clean, yet hand-drawn look. Hold on to your Beziér curves, and let’s get started…

Recap: Vectips Interview with Go Media’s Jeff Finley

I thought I’d repost the recap of the interview I did with Vectips that took place over Twitter on Wednesday, August 27 at 1:00 pm EST. The interview was pretty fun, and definitely interesting to hold over twitter. Read on for some of my thoughts on designing and illustration. If you got a chance to watch the interview live over Twitter we’d love to know what you thought about it!

The Interview

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    Vectips: Hey Jeff, how is it going?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: I’m good, excited for the interview. Let’s do this.

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    Vectips: Thanks again for doing this interview with Vectips! First I would like ask you some questions about Illustrator.

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    Vectips: You are a master with the Wacom in Photoshop. Do you use the Wacom features in Illustrator?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: I do use my Wacom in Illustrator, but surprisingly I prefer to draw in Photoshop and Live Trace my result in AI

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    Vectips: Is there a benefit to using a Wacom with Photoshop Brushes over the Calligraphic Brush with a Wacom in Illustrator?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: I like the way PS handles pressure sensitivity. But using brushes in AI can be awesome. Like tapered brushes for hatching

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    Vectips: When you place the Photoshop file into illustrator, what is your Live Trace settings like?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Nothing fancy, I usually leave the Live Trace settings as default. My art is black and white anyway and 300dpi, so it works fine

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    Vectips: In the “Bold is Beautiful” t-shirt, did you have to build the files as vector art for the screen printing?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Surprisingly no, Design by Humans took my layered PSD and somehow managed to separate it into 9 colors and screen print it.

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    Vectips: Wow, that is impressive.

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Yeah DBH did a great job. Vectorizing things would have tripled the workload and made it hard to get watercolor effects and such

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    Vectips: Go Media gives free samples from the Arsenal Packs. Do you feel sites giving away free resources hurts the design industry?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: I could talk for a long time on this. In a way, yes because it devalues the hard work that designers do. No because…

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: No because it can be viewed as helping new designers break in. As they grow they’ll move past the freebies do their own stuff

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    Vectips: Well said, it will also push designer to keep pushing the boundaries of design.

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: It inspires me to do things differently. If my style is being replicated and given away for free, it’s time to move on.

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    Vectips: Do people steal your artwork?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Yes, sadly, quite often. I know people steal our vector packs and such. But sometimes people steal work I’ve done for clients.

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: My friend @RandomEntity says to beware of the Manticores! Don’t steal artwork unless you want to get publicly humiliated…

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    Vectips: If some of these people stealing your work are listening now, what would you tell them?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Unless they want to have a penis photoshopped onto their nose and sent to all their Myspace friends, they should stop right now

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    Vectips: Ha! Penis noses are never a good thing.

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Yeah I stopped calling myself a Manticore after that incident. Pretty unprofessional. Some Manticores can be brutal about it.

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    Vectips: What is the worst thing about working for Go Media?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Worst? Gosh, probably working in a cramped townhouse with 12 people. It can be loud and distracting. Can’t wait for the new office

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    Vectips: The best thing?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Best? Probably the freedom and opportunity to succeed on my own terms. It’s open ended, so every day opens new doors.

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    Vectips: So what is a Manticore? Is this weird thing a Manticore? http://poprl.com/Vj. Is there any Manticore at Go Media.

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Yup that’s a Manticore. But the Manticores “club” started on Emptees to promote artist rights. http://tinyurl.com/2r5pt4

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    Vectips: What rights does it promote?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Scroll down to the bottom of the wikipedia article to “real life applications” to understand what it’s all about.

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    Vectips: That’s great! Didn’t even know about it.

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: When word gets out a design was stolen or another designer ripped off another, members would attempt to police the situation.

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Read more about manticores on emptees http://tinyurl.com/62z8nl

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    Vectips: I’ve read you are a movie buff. What movie or director would you associate your work with?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: My fav directors are Werner Herzog, Mike Leigh, Andrew Bujalski, Harmony Korine, Alan Clarke, Dardenne Bros, Lukas Moodysson

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Their style of film is real, raw, gritty, honest, and sincere. That’s how I want my work to be, but I’m not sure if I’m there yet.

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    Vectips: What aspects, if any, of your designs reflects part of your personality?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: The subject matter, the details, the technique – I feel it reflects my personality and my interests in music/film. Tough question.

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    Vectips: We are nearing the end of the interview. Got anything you want to say, products to plug?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Awe too bad. I feel like there are a lot of questions I could answer but not enough time in the day. If you think of any more lmk.

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Some plugs: we’re converting all our vector packs into Photoshop Brushes, should go on sale this week. More apparel templates soon

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    Vectips: I would love to keep going if you want. I have more questions, I just don’t want to take up too much of your time.

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Yeah keep em coming. like i said, bring it on!

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Also I can take user questions if there are any…

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    Vectips: What is your best website resource for inspiration?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: I really like http://www.ffffound.com

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    Vectips: From dickieadams: Have you tried inkscape as an alternative for your original sketches?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: I’ve tried it once, but I have Illustrator so there is no reason for me to use Inkscape. Although Manga Studio is up and coming.

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    Vectips: You say you have a knack for generating “buzz” around products. What is you most useful online tool for generating this “buzz”?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Well, it’s our blog first off. Twitter is working its way up too. Social Media is still king of generating buzz, esp in design.

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: But generating buzz is never automatic, building real relationships with people is the best way and it takes time.

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    Vectips: From betterthanhuman: Speaking of inspiration, what other designers do you consider your influences?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: As always Aaron Horkey and Horsebites r big inspirations. I also like Cristy Road, Alex Trochut, John Baizley, and Vania Zouravliov.

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    Vectips: From StellasEmpire: What gives you hope to carry on a project if frustration is high, deadlines are freaking out and you could tell everyone to fuck off?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Sometimes when all that stuff gets me down, I find something I believe in and donate my work for free. Makes me feel good

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    Vectips: From wkdown: Who’s Twitters do you enjoy the most?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: I like punknews, collis, and to be honest, most of my fav artists don’t have twitter, or not that I know of.

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    Vectips: How is the Designer Help via Twitter going for Go Media?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Good, a little awkward cause multiple staff use it. It can be tough to catch questions when following hundreds of designers.

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: But we’re enjoying the experiment. We can filter to see only tweets directed go_media. surprised we’re not getting more questions.

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    Vectips: What do you do if you are not feeling creative?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Surf for inspiration on ffffound or get away from my desk for awhile. maybe take a nap.I go through phases of on and off.

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: I have time for 2 more questions and I should get back to work :-)

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    Vectips: What is you worst habit as a designer?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Probably doing too much at once. I’ve constantly got a dozen windows open and feel overwhelmed and distracted.

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    Vectips: What is you single best accomplishment in your design career so far?

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Being featured magazines is nice. But my career is made up lots of small accomplishments. But moving into our new office is nice.

  • Big_favicon_normal

    Vectips: Well, I will let you get back to work. Thanks again for doing the interview!

  • Jeff-face2_normal

    jeff_finley: Sure thing! I had a good time. And just for kicks, people can subscribe to the GoMediaZine blog’s RSS http://tinyurl.com/687vz8

Vectips Interview with Jeff Finley via Twitter

Vectips interview with Jeff Finley

This is pretty cool. I’m going to be doing an interview with Vectips over Twitter Wednesday, August 27th at 1:00pm EST. Vectips is a new blog that’s constantly posting resources for vector artists. I’ll be answering all of the questions Ryan has for me.

Why do it over Twitter? Because it makes it public and interactive. You can “watch” the interview in real time and even submit your own questions. I think it will be fun and it’s something new with Twitter, so that’s cool too.

When: Wednesday, August 27 at 1:00 pm EST.
Where: Twitter.com/vectips and twitter.com/jeff_finley

How: If you are already on twitter, follow both Vectips and myself and watch the conversation unfold. If you are not on Twitter or want an easier way to follow the conversation, go to Quotably.com and search for Vectips or Jeff_Finley. I’m not sure how quick Quotably updates the tweets but you can try and follow this way. If anyone has a better suggestion in following a conversation on Twitter please let everyone know by posting a comment!

More Info:

Read all the details on how you can be a part of the interview.

Crazy Idea? Go Media Offers Design Help via Twitter

Get Design help via Twitter from Go Media

Go Media is trying something new here. We’re using our official twitter account to offer design help and customer service. Crazy? Maybe.

Basically, designers like you can ask a question and we’ll try to answer it. It’s like having a know-it-all designer working next to you that you can bug from time to time!

We could be opening up a can of worms here, but we think it will work. I know most designers probably wouldn’t want hundreds of people asking them where the “make it cool” filter is or “How do I use Photoshop?” But we’re hoping we can actually offer some real help here. Let’s make it work!

Read up on the new project and find out how you can get involved.

For the future: If this works out, we plan to get some of our favorite designers to help out as well. Imagine having a network of brilliant designers there to give you tips when you need it? It could happen.