New Release: Grid Kit

design grids download vector

Grid Kit Released

We cooked up the grid kit to be a go-to ingredient in your page layout process. We revisited the classic tomes of page construction and put together a smashing sampling of grids that will inspire & guide your eye through the design process.

All of the grids are vector so you can use them right in Adobe Illustrator, or overlay them onto your pages in InDesign, Photoshop or other design application.

Download the grid kit for $9.99

What’s included?

We’ve included every kind of base grid we could dream up: various columns, margins, gutters, and rows. We’ve got isometric grids, golden concentric circles, graduated golden sections, gradient cells, and more. Several page construction methods resulted in a few of our favorite grids in this kit.

grid kit page design construction grid system

Most of the grids are for a single 8.5×11 page, but a handful use Van de Graaf’s page construction methods to build a page area for facing pages. If you want to see each & every grid included in the kit, check out the Grid Kit Facebook album.
van de graaf page construction grid system
grid system page design grids go media arsenal
Remember to check out the Grid Kit Facebook album to see a preview of all the grids in the kit.

Adobe Font Finder

Fonts. What designer doesn’t have too many? And we are always on the hunt for more.

The internet is a goldmine for fonts, but it’s not always easy to find just the font you’re looking for. It’s always good to have another font tool in your arsenal, and with that in mind we’re giving you a heads up on the Adobe Font Finder.

Adobe’s Font Finder works in a similar fashion to many online font tools, but in this case it’s wrapped into a slick Flash presentation that works fast and looks sharp.

Enter a bit of text for the samples to display in, check a few of the many font options to narrow down your search — and voila!

The fonts I checked out from my initial review of the site all seemed to lead to paid fonts, and clicking on any of the search results will take you to Adobe’s online font store.

Of course, you may want/need to purchase on of these fonts, but it’s also easy enough to use the tool to get some inspiration, or even find a font you may already have buried in your own type collection already.

I’ve included some screenshots below to give you an idea of the range of font attributes you have the ability to search by. They are pretty extensive compared to many of the free font sites I’ve used, but then again they do want you to buy something from them.

Have a great font resource of your own? Please share it with us in the comments section below.

Pantone In Your Pocket

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Pantone has recently released myPantone, a new color guide app for the iPhone and iPod Touch.

The $9.99 app allows you to choose from these PANTONE color system libraries:

  • PANTONE MATCHING SYSTEM (coated, uncoated and matte)
  • PANTONE Goe (coated and uncoated)
  • PANTONE Pastels (coated and uncoated)
  • PANTONE FASHION + HOME (paper and cotton)
  • Includes sRGB, HTML and L*a*b* for all colors

You can capture and extract colors from photos and snap to the closest PANTONE Color using images loaded on your iPhone or directly from images taken by your iPhone camera. The app will automatically generates harmonious color combinations, and you can use it to cross-reference PANTONE colors to other PANTONE color libraries. Once you have created your color palettes you can then share them via e-mail an HTML image of your palette or e-mail color palettes that can be used in the Adobe Creative Suite (.ase files), QuarkXPress and CorelDraw. Users can also upload to the myPANTONE.com palette sharing web site.

Other features include text and voice annotation of palettes, posting of notifications of new palettes to Twitter and Facebook and GPS tagging of palettes.

mypantone-screens

The disclaimer on the iTunes App Store states: “PANTONE Colors displayed here may not match PANTONE-identified standards” so this is probably best used for a reference on the go as opposed to a full-fledged swatch solution. One plus side to the iPhone is that Pantone knows the exact screen the colors are displayed on, so they have a better chance of calibrating what’s seen on screen to their actual colors.

I haven’t yet had a chance to demo the app, but once I do I’ll compare to my physical swatch books and see how they hold up. Even if they were close, it would be very handy to not have to lug around swatch books when meeting with clients, even if just to choose general families of color swatches.

If you’re ready to plunk down your ten bucks, you can head over and pick up a copy of myPantone at the App Store.

Photoshop vs. Illustrator: Part 1