Tutorial: The Making Of An Editorial Illustration with These Are Things

A These Are Things Tutorial:

Flip through your favorite newspaper or magazine and you’re bound to find a lot more than just words on a page. Alongside many articles, you’ll find art that helps to illuminate key concepts from the text. These pieces are called editorial illustrations.

From tiny spot illustrations to multiple page spreads, these informative works of art are sprinkled throughout each issue. Political cartoons are a classic example of editorial illustrations, but today’s publications use the work of contemporary artists to visually interpret a wide range of topics.

As editorial illustrators, our job is to create an engaging visual that both supports and explains the accompanying text copy. A successful piece carefully balances the art director’s vision with our own ideas, all while clearly communicating the article’s core idea to the reader.

These projects an exercise in creative problem solving. From the super-quick turnaround to the varied subject matter, each assignment is a new visual puzzle for us to solve.

Today, we’re going show you how we created an editorial illustration for Southwest Airlines’ in-flight magazine, Spirit. We’ll walk you through the entire illustration process, from our first client conversation to seeing our work in print.

Ready? Let’s get started!

1. Discussion & Research

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Each editorial illustration is a collaboration between the client and the artist, so the first step of every project is to have a conference with the magazine’s art director.

First, we discuss the topic of the piece. We’ll be creating art to accompany an article about four business tips. We’re given a preliminary page layout along with rough copy to refer to during the design process.

Next, we talk about the creative direction of the piece. After conferencing with the art director, we’re given some specific guidelines. The piece will consist of four individual illustrations, each mirroring the tall, elongated shape of the four existing columns on the page. The art director also has a fun idea: to model each individual illustration after a classic motivational poster, like these. This information, along with the article itself, gives us a great starting point as we begin the process.

2. Initial Sketch

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It’s time to start drawing! Since the “motivational poster” concept for this piece is already set, our goal is to come up with one solid sketch to present to the client. For projects that are more open-ended, we’ll usually come up with 3-5 different concepts during the sketch phase.

Working with the actual page layout as our guide, we use a Cintiq 13HD pen display to start laying down rough ideas for each component of the illustration in Adobe Photoshop. Using a pen display allows us to work directly inside the page layout, ensuring that our sketches are drawn at the correct size and proportion. For a more budget-friendly option, simply print the page layout on paper and use it as a template with tracing paper.

After working through a number of ideas for each individual poster, we land on this sketch as our initial concept. Each poster visually depicts the concepts of teamwork, innovation, preparation, and fairness. The article talks about the benefits and disadvantages of each business concept, so each poster will show an example of the idea both working and not working.

3. Revised Sketch

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Before submitting the sketch to our client, we sit down and review our work. At this stage, our primary goal is to create a piece that is both visually and conceptually strong.

During our internal review, we notice that two of the four “poster” concepts involve hands. We like that the hands introduce a human element without showing a face. Incorporating hands into all four posters also creates continuity throughout the entire piece.

We revise the drawing to reflect our new and improved concept. Each poster now feels more similar in complexity and is visually easier to read. Once we’re happy with the sketch, we paint in a few layers of gray to explore the value structure of the piece and help the client envision the final piece.

4. Client Feedback & Revisions

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Next, we send our sketch off to the client for review. The feedback is positive. We’re on the right track! The magazine’s art director has a suggestion for the first poster. Instead of drawing pointing fingers, what if we create a network of intertwining handshakes to represent the benefits (and pitfalls) of teamwork? We love the idea, so we hit the drawing board to create a new sketch for the first poster before we move on to the linework stage.

5. Linework

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Once the revised sketch is approved, it’s time to turn our rough drawing into a finished illustration. Using the sketch as a guide, we begin to draw individual elements in Adobe Illustrator. Using many of the standard shape tools coupled with the Pathfinder palette and pen tool, we begin crafting geometric hands, lightbulbs, and other items.

Where our sketching process is fluid and loose, the linework stage is methodical and meticulous. It’s a balancing act of capturing the energy of the initial sketch while cleaning it up for it’s final form.

6. Color

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With the linework completed, we begin to add color. In this case, the client had a rough color palette to work with, so we jumped right in and started applying color. With other projects, choosing colors is up to us, so we’ll typically do a few exploratory color studies before deciding on a final color scheme.

You’ll notice that some of the design elements changed at this stage. When we start working with color, we almost always find a few things that can be improved upon from our first pass at the linework. In this case, we changed the positioning of the lightbulb hands, added some editing marks to the papers, and drew some fun trophies to go with the medals.

7. Texture

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After the color is finished and we’ve made our final tweaks to the design, we jump into Photoshop to add our signature texture treatment. This final step adds dimension, contrast, and interest to the flat vector artwork.

To bring our vector art in from Illustrator, we copy and paste major element groups into a new Photoshop document as Smart Objects. Next, we use various selection tools to isolate individual colors. Finally, we use a dissolve brush, multiplied layers, and our Cintiq pen display to paint in areas of shaded color.

Here’s a before and after view of our texture treatment. The effect is subtle, but goes a long way towards making the piece feel finished.

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8. Submit & Wait

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With the texture treatment complete, we export a high-resolution version from Photoshop and send it off to the magazine, where they’ll drop it into the page layout along with the final text copy.

Now comes the hard part: waiting! Editorial deadlines tend to be a few months in advance of the publication date, so it’ll be a while before we get to see our masterpiece in print. Eventually, when the day comes, we run to our favorite bookstore, crack open that new issue, and see our work right there on the page. There’s nothing quite like it!

Psst!

Editors note: If you haven’t yet, we highly suggest you watch their highly acclaimed talk from WMC Fest!

More These Are Things | Shop | Blog | Facebook | Twitter | These Are Things Instagram | Jen’s Instagram | Omar’s Instagram
On the GoMediaZine:
WMC Fest 4 Speaker Videos Release
An Interview with Jen Adrion & Omar Noory of These Are Things
Episode 9: Myths of Owning Your Own Design Firm plus an Interview with These Are Things

Graphic Design Podcast: Welcome to the Go Media Podcast!

Graphic Design Podcast: Welcome to the Go Media Podcast!

Our monthly Ohio based graphic design podcast here at Go Media is dedicated to tips, tricks, and tales of the business-minded artist and designer. How can you be more profitable? More creatively fulfilled? It’s our way of letting you inside our studio to learn about the ups and downs we face here at Go Media and how we’re dealing with them.

Our podcast archives can also be found on Soundcloud!

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Episode 1
: What to Do When the Well Runs Dry

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Episode 2: The Commoditization of Design and a Good Customer Experience

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Episode 3: The Role of a Designer

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Episode 4: Pricing, Haters, and Bad Clients

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Episode 5: 2012 Year in Review

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Episode 6: Weapons of Mass Creation Fest 2013 Kick Off!

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Episode 7: How to Close Design Leads

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Episode 8: Interview with WMC Fest Speaker Troy DeShano

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Episode 9: Myths of Owning Your Own Design Firm plus an Interview with These Are Things

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Episode 10: An Interview with Jess and Tim from Kern and Burn

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Episode 11: An Interview with Mark Brickey from Adventures in Design

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Episode 12: An Interview with Brandon Rike

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Episode 13: Interviews with Nick Disabato and Caroline Moore

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Episode 14: An Interview with Adam Garcia

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Episode 15: An Interview with Jon Contino, WMC Fest Is This Week!

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Episode 16: Recovering from WMC and Launching Drawn to Business

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Episode 17: Advice for a Graphic Design Student

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Episode 18: What We’re Thankful for in 2013

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Episode 19: Drawn to Business Q&A with Bill Beachy

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Episode 20: Our 2013 Year in Review

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Episode 21: Why Should Designers Use a CRM?

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Episode 22: Surviving As A Designer with OKPants

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Episode 23: A Conversation with Mike Jones from CreativeSouth.com

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Episode 24: Interview with Todd Gauman, Event Director of WMC Fest 5

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Episode 25: Loren Naji and the Cleveland Art Scene

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Episode 26: Live from WMC Fest 5!

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Episode 27: Looking forward to 2015

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Episode 28: What’s the Deal with Go Media and WMC6?

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Episode 29: Collecting Metrics and What We’ve Learned

Secret to Success: Track Your Metrics!

It’s a new year. A great time to look at what’s been working for us here at Go Media, as well as what hasn’t worked and what we’ll be doing better in the year to come.

We do this in the most accurate, meaningful way possible, one that benefits us ten-fold.

Ready for the simple, yet essential key to Go Media‘s success?

We track our metrics.

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What, you say, are metrics?

As Bill Beachy describes in Drawn to Business, metrics, are “key measurable components of your business” tracked by way of a dashboard (i.e. spreadsheet).

They are imperative.

Think of it like this, Bill visualizes, “when you drive your car down the street, how do you know how fast you’re going? You look at your dashboard—a collection of gauges that give you the most important pieces of information you need while driving your car. The speedometer tells you how fast you’re going. The odometer tells you how far you’ve gone. The gas gauge tells you how much fuel you have left. These readings such as miles per hour, fullness of your gas tank and total miles are known as “metrics.” Can you imagine driving your car without a dashboard? It’s certainly possible. But you might get a speeding ticket, run out of gas or burn your engine up because you didn’t change the oil on time.”

“Running your design firm without metrics and a dashboard is very much like driving a car without one. It’s possible, but sooner or later you’re going to get yourself into trouble. Not only will metrics and a dashboard keep you out of trouble, they’ll also let you know when you’re doing well, when you need to hire more staff or when you deserve a bonus!”

They will drive your decision making.

“Tracking your metrics over time will also give you valuable information that will drive your decision-making. Imagine if you started tracking the realized rate of all your design projects. And through this tracking you learned that your realized rate on branding projects is $200/hour, but your realized rate on web projects was $75/hour. What might you conclude with this information? Maybe you want to sell more branding work. Or, maybe you realize that you’re overestimating your branding work and under estimating the workload for website development. The point is, you can’t make informed decisions about your company if you don’t have the data to base decisions on. This data comes from your metrics and dashboards.”

They can be kept simple.

Once you have your system down, tracking your metrics can be quite simple.  Like anything else, start small, go slow and build as you see fit.  As Bill notes, “At Go Media, the data recording that goes into our metrics is running every day. Employees are logging hours, invoices are being made in QuickBooks, sales leads come in through our website, etc. But we only gather this data and reflect on it once a month. We have a spreadsheet where we drop the data at the conclusion of each month. This way we can look back at the month-by-month performance of our company.”

What do I track?

Here are some examples of what we track, how we track them and what’s important about them:

Bank Balance: it’s as simple as looking at your bank statement!

Sales: this is the monthly total of cash in the door.  We use our bank statement for this one too. Go Media runs our books on a cash-basis accounting method: we only count actual dollars in and out the door as real.

Expenses: again, this is real basic stuff. We pull this number off our bank statement: dollars out the door.

Net profit/loss: sales minus expenses. Did we lose money or make money this past month?

Leads: how many new inquires did we get? It’s also critical that you track where these leads are coming from. Ask your customers!

Proposals sent: we track both the number of proposals we send out and the total dollar amount. Over time we’ve been able to calculate our “close rate.”

Hours networking: this is a metric specific to the sales team. I’ve learned over the years how important it is to get out from behind your desk.

Stress level: how are we feeling? Don’t forget that you are not a machine. Keeping track of your team’s stress levels will let you know in advance if someone needs help.

Web traffic: we keep an eye on all the website traffic to our different properties. For this we use Google Analytics.

Project realized rate: your realized rate is the hourly amount you actually earn on a project. Calculating this is very simple. It’s the amount paid divided by hours worked.

Estimation accuracy: estimate accuracy is closely related to project realized rate. Except in this case we are only looking at hours. Did the hours estimated for the project match the hours projected? To calculate this, we divide the hours estimated by the hours worked.

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These are the main metrics we track.  Find what works best for you and your company.  Remember, as Bill reminds, “the more information you gather over time on your company, the more informed your decisions will be. And as I stress over and over, you need to be making decisions based on knowledge. You need to gather your facts, gather your customer feedback, gather staff input and then decide how to move your company forward. Your dashboards are an important part of that.”

Learn more Metrics, Dashboards and Business systems by picking up Drawn to Business. If you’d like to download our Dashboards for your own use, be sure to pick up either the Plus or Pro packages.

We want to know…do you track metrics? What do you track? Are we missing something? Please leave your thoughts in the comments below!

How I Built a Killer Morning Routine

This post was originally written on my personal blog Maker/Mistaker and I thought I should repost it here.

So you call yourself a night owl huh? Most creative people I know (myself included) felt like they get in the zone after midnight. All is still and quiet and you can finally focus on your work. And if you’re not working, you’re doing something until the wee hours of the morning. If you’re like most night owls, you dread getting up in the morning.

That was certainly me. My wife too. Over time our bed time kept getting pushed back later and later because there was always “something to do” that we just had to do. We weren’t tired and going to bed felt like giving up on the day.

A Night Owl No More

I have been getting up at least one hour earlier for over a month now. In fact, the past two weeks I’ve been getting up two and a half hours earlier than normal. The night owl in me would ask, “Why the fuck would you ever get up before you have to?”

This getting up early habit has led to a month-long streak of wonderful habits including exercise, walking, meditation, mindfulness, journaling, and reading to name a few. Each of those has tremendous benefits on their own.

Those are all things I never “had time for” no matter how many extra hours I stayed up. Typically, staying up extra hours just meant more time on the computer. Am I right?

If I Could Only Get Up Early

I didn’t have the ambition to do all those things at first. All I started with was a desire to get up early just because. If I can regularly do that, then I’ll fill it with things to do I’m sure. So I started small with just the cue (or trigger), routine, and reward system to get my ass out of bed. Something I learned from the Power of Habit book.

Cue: Alarm goes off.
Routine: Get out of bed, crawl to couch.
Reward: Cup of coffee while I watched TV on my laptop.

I made sure to add this to my Lift habits so I could keep track. This worked great until the very next day when I forgot to set my alarm and woke up late. Dammit. I woke up early the following morning to get back on track. Then it was the weekend; which of course I slept in and stopped caring about my goal. Then I read The Miracle Morning and that changed everything.

The book stressed how it’s totally ok to be as simple and small as you need to be. The author even described how you can do the Miracle Morning routine in just six minutes! Who doesn’t have time for that?

The book refreshed my inspiration on meditation and personal development. I started following Hal’s suggested routine of waking up, chugging a glass of water, sitting in silence for five minutes, doing some mild exercise, journaling, etc. I tried it out and eventually started customizing it to suit my needs.

My Morning Routine

I use the AM Routine app to help me stay on track. You set your desired end time (like when you have to leave for work) and you add habits with time estimates to your routine. It will calculate exactly when the built-in alarm should go off to give you enough time to do your routine. It even has a handy dashboard to show you what task you should be on, how much time is left, and what’s coming up next. This is brilliant for those foggy mornings. You don’t have to think at all!

  • 6:30 AM: alarm goes off. My phone is across the room and I have to get up to turn it off. This prevents me from snoozing.
  • Get dressed, brush and floss my teeth, feed the rabbit: 5 minutes
  • Drink a glass of water and/or make coffee:  5 minutes
  • Meditate: 10 minutes
  • Read affirmations: 5 min
  • Watch a show on my computer: 30-60 minutes
  • Write in my journal: 10 minutes
  • Go for a walk and listen to audiobook: 25 minutes
  • Push-ups, sit-ups, pull-ups, baby-freeze (breakdance move), lift weights: 5 minutes
  • Shower and get ready: 15 minutes
  • Eat Breakfast: 15 minutes
  • Pack lunch, get the mail: 5 minutes

So that’s my routine. Sometimes for breakfast I’ll make a chocolate super-food smoothie that I got from The Miracle Morning book, so I sip it throughout my routine. I’m getting a little bored of this routine already and might want to shake things up. I’m adding in 10 minutes of writing in my blog and slowly eliminating my TV watching time. The beauty of this is that I can do whatever the fuck I want. It’s my morning routine.

Jeff’s 5 Tips for a Killer Morning Routine

  1. Start small. Remember, pick up the goddamn weight, don’t worry about lifting yet. Just do as little as possible so you can check it off and feel good about it. Small wins are the only way you’ll feel motivated to keep going.
  2. Do something pleasurable. For me that was watching a new episode of a tv series. It could be video games. Think of how you felt on Christmas morning as a kid, you couldn’t wait to jump out of bed. As an adult, what would give you that type of excitement in the morning?
  3. Don’t let yourself think. In the morning, your willpower and decision making ability is extremely low. You need to build up a routine that is dead simple especially right as you step out of bed. For me, this means turning off my alarm clock, unplugging my iPhone charger and stumbling over to my dresser where I have my morning routine outfit already ready in my top drawer. Plan out your entire morning routine in advance so you don’t have to make any decisions in the morning. Even a zombie can do it!
  4. Set things out the night before. I wear the same shorts and shirt every day. Deciding what to wear is hard when you’re groggy. Even my breakfast smoothie is created the night before. The glass for my morning water is always in the same place. It requires no thinking to get going. This is key!
  5. Focus on personal development. Do not work! Resist the temptation to check email or social media. Do not start working on a project right away without first spending time working on your own personal development. You have the rest of the day to worry about checking stuff off your to-do list. Do not feel guilty about being “unproductive” and do not feel selfish for focusing on yourself. You deserve to have time to develop the life you want to live.

Freebie: Mockup Everything Templates from your friends at Go Media

Hello Go Media Faithful!

I’m here with an early Christmas gift…some free mockup templates sponsored by Mockup Everything! Mockup Everything, created Go Media, provides an easy-to-use platform for applying your graphic designs to a growing number of print products in the following categories: technology, apparel, print, outdoor and food & beverage.

Our free version allows you to visually prototype your designs, saving you from a design disaster.  Take it a step further and upgrade to the Pro version to gain access to over one hundred product templates and the ability to mockup snapshots twice the size of the Free Version.

Don’t Be Greedy Now…

We want to see your work! Share your designs to our Pinterest board for your chance to be featured each month here on the ‘Zine, as well as on all of our social media channels! Click on the board for more info:

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Free Mockup Templates:

Ready? Just click the link following each photo and get to steppin’ my friends.

Wheat Paste Posters

Wheat Paste Posters

iPhone in Hand

iPhone In Hand

Men’s Crew Neck Sweater

Men's Crew Neck Sweater Flat - Front

Hardcover Book

Hardcover Book - Wide

Enjoy and Merry Mockups!

Heather, Product Manager at Go Media
Email me for template requests

How to Create a Winning Email Marketing Campaign

Email marketing is a great way to blast your brand to the millions of fans following your every move. But like anything else, there is an art to creating the perfect campaign that will not only be worth reading, but worth opening in the first place.

We asked our friend Fabio Carneiro, over at Mailchimp, to share with us some words of wisdom on this very topic.  Read on for Fabio’s 7 tips to creating an email marketing campaign that matters.

7 Tips by Fabio Carneiro

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1. Short and Sweet

The rule of thumb for email length is simple: shorter is better. But that’s very dependent on a few factors, like the audience you’re sending to, or the type of content you’re sending. A good example is our MailChimp UX newsletter; they tend to be quite long for an email, but they’re geared to an audience that wants to read in-depth articles; the length of each email is fine for them. An eCommerce email, on the other hand, would benefit more from being very short and focused, concentrating on, say, just four or six products instead of a long list of fifteen.

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2. Analyze frequency and sending date

While sending frequency is ultimately dependent on your audience, I don’t think I’m going out on a limb when I say that many people send too often. In my personal experience, finding eCommerce emails in my inbox from one retailer more than once a week is aggravating, but that’s certainly not true of the all email subscribers. Frequency is a tricky thing to get right, but I think it helps to temper sending frequency with sending date. It might work out better to send an email once a week, but on a Tuesday, when everyone’s come off the Monday work-week email blitz. If your content is more leisurely or humorous, maybe the beginning and end of the week work well; everyone needs a break at the beginning of the week, and they’re also generally more carefree at its end, and the content suits the mood.

Ultimately, nailing down frequency takes a lot of experimentation. Many senders make a decision to send emails out on a certain day and time, and never go back to test different scenarios. It really pays (figuratively and even literally) to treat a subscriber list as a complex conversation with your readers, and then tweak what you send, when you send it, and how often you send it according to reader interest.

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3. Include Images

Images in email are good. They’re often crucial to well-crafted, interesting content, and images can make a huge difference in how engaged your readers are. Is there a right number of images to try to include? I don’t think so. The proverb, ‘One picture is worth a thousand words,’ holds just as true in email as anywhere else. Where you can run into trouble is the inclusion of too many images, or images too large in size (both file- and dimension-wise).

With the meteoric rise of mobile readership, we’re required to consider how your data is received on the reader’s end. Small screens and slow cell service carriers are very real concerns that everyone should keep in mind when creating content for email. Dimensionally large images will either require a lot of awkward scrolling on the reader’s behalf or, if the email is responsive, will be difficult to make out in detail when its size is reduced for small displays. Large file sizes can clog up the works on the reader’s end as well, making an email slow to download and actually costing the reader more money if their carrier’s data rates are high and bandwidth is restrictive.

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4. Create a Custom Template

There are a lot of good code bases floating around out there to help anyone get started. MailChimp provides a large selection of starter templates on GitHub, ranging from non-mobile fixed designs to mobile-friendly, responsive ones, all created with stability and ease-of-use in mind. They can all be used in MailChimp or any other email service provider. The HTML Email Boilerplate is another good resource, with code built around simplicity that’s great for newbies.

These code bases offer a great foundation, but to get the most out of an email it’s best to eventually create your own. A lot of designers see that as a daunting task, because there are so many more hurdles in HTML email design than there are in traditional web design. To help dispel some of that mystery, I’ve created a sort of one-stop reference site that guides anyone through the broad concepts of how email works, on to how to design an email, through the development of an email.

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5. Create a Catchy Headline

Subject lines are a tricky thing. I’d hesitate to say there’s a “best” subject line or lines out there, because it’s very subjective and dependent on your content, your audience, and tons of other factors; The personality of your email matters and word choice matters, but something like line length doesn’t. Ultimately, it comes down to this: creating a good subject line is a craft all its own, and it’s one that requires experimentation and testing.

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6. Grow your List with Great Content

Two words: great content. That’s what matters most in any email because if your audience isn’t interested, you don’t have a leg to stand on. It’s easier said than done, but it’s certainly possible – Dave Pell’s NextDraft is a perfect example. Dave is a spectacular writer, though. If you aren’t, there are a few things you can do to improve.

First and foremost: engage with readers. If your email delivers content that’s worthy of discussion, make yourself available to your readers and actually have a discussion. Humans crave interaction with others, and email is a wonderful medium for that.

Second, narrow your focus. Don’t try to please everyone using the exact same content – it won’t work in the long run. Find out what your readers are most receptive to, and segment your list based on those interests. If you send to 1,000 people, but you know that half wants to see photos and the other just wants to read, make the effort and serve both interests.

Third: personalize. The simple act of including a person’s first and last name, and making content more specific to their location will make your email meaningful to them and their immediate circle of friends, who then are more likely to share with their circles of friends, and so on.

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7. Avoid the Unsubscribe

What makes people hit “unsubscribe”?

There’s no shortage of discussion on this subject, because so many things can cause people to unsubscribe. Email frequency is chief among those reasons. Too much email is a huge annoyance. Even if someone loves what you’re sending, if you’re sending it every day, it’s almost guaranteed that you’ll drive them away because of the burden you’re placing on that person to read every email, then eventually delete lots of emails. No one enjoys being nagged.

Too little email can also cause people to unsubscribe, because of a lack of engagement or even confusion; if a person signs up to receive your email, only to find one in their inbox 8 months later, it’s entirely possible that they’ve forgotten about you. At that point, an email from you can be an unwelcome sight and even thought of as spam.

People will also unsubscribe if they feel your email is irrelevant. Pay attention to their interests, and craft your content accordingly. Avoid being boring as well; don’t send the same staid content in each email – getting the sale or increasing readership is important, but maybe it’s not necessary to make it the focus of every message you send. Mix it up a little.

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Keeping all of these factors in mind takes patience, time and dedication.  However, careful attention to your audience, and their changing needs, will ensure you produce an excellent email marketing campaign reflective of your equally engaging subject matter.  Good luck and let us know about your successes, and misses, below in the comments section!

Thank you to Fabio and Mailchimp for your time! 

More Mailchimp: Blog | Twitter | Vimeo | Facebook

8 Detrimental Design Habits to Break Today

You’ve just landed that internship or job of your dreams and are ready to take on the world. Maybe you’ve been working at a firm or have been freelancing for years.

You’re sure you’ve got it under control. You’ve got this in the bag!

But wait!  There are just a few common mistakes that may be holding you back from achieving your full potential.

We’d like to help. Thanks to some great names in our industry, we have a wealth of advice for you regarding some design habits to break now! Or, better, those to watch out for and nab before they become etched into stone.

Tracey Halvorsen of Fastspot
Tracey Halvorsen of Fastspot

1. Failing to Ask for Feedback

Young designers / interns make the mistake of not asking for enough feedback. They are fresh out of school, and perhaps eager to prove themselves, but they are missing out on so much more learning by assuming their school experiences have prepared them for the real world. It’s a problem in that they end up in a bubble and don’t benefit from the team environment as much as they would if they reached out and initiated more feedback from their team.

They can correct the problem by being a good communicator, making it known during their hiring process / interview process – that it’s something they are actively looking for, and then following up by making sure it’s part of their process once the job starts. It’s tempting to hide away and just do the work, and hope that one day you advance to better projects. But you can speed this up by being more aggressive and “asking for” more challenges, feedback and work.

I’ve only had one design intern at Fastspot, ever, who constantly bugged me for more challenging work. This person also actively sought out feedback, jumped into group critiques (asking if they could join b/c they weren’t overly busy of course) and soaked up as much interaction, communication and feedback as they could get their hands on. That was the one intern who I promised a job to when they were done with school.

Everyone who’s just starting out should take every chance they can to get feedback, be challenged and push themselves outside of the comfort zones they’ve established at school. School is a lovely fantasy land but the real world is full of rewarding opportunities if you seek them out and never settle for mediocracy.

– Tracey Halvorsen, President and Chief Visionary Officer of Fastspot, award-winning interactive agency in Baltimore, Maryland

Rachel Downey of Studio Graphique
Rachel Downey of Studio Graphique

2. Ignoring Time Constraints

New designers are often inexperienced with managing budgets, and time is attributed to the project budget. We often see interns and young designers overworking their designs, either through over-development or the exploration of too many concepts. This burns the project budget in the early stages and leaves less time for development of the chosen direction. We encourage new designers to stay off the computer and hand-sketch to quickly explore many ideas and then share those for discussion and selection before moving to digital. Early and frequent check-ins with their colleagues help them stay on track with project objectives and project budgets.

– Rachel Downey, Founder and Principal of Studio Graphique, a lead branding, placemaking and wayfinding firm in Cleveland, Ohio

Alex Wier of Wier / Stewart
Alex Wier of Wier / Stewart

3. Not “Making it Real”

One of the toughest things for designers who are coming out of school (or are still in it) is making things real. Designing anything is only half of making it real. The other half is picking stock, converting colors and outlines, making sure info is correct, working with the developer, etc. Those are the things that take attention to detail and organization. It’s also something we’ve noticed not a lot of designers are taught. They get color theory, typography, etc. but they don’t get “how to make a 3 color brochure a reality” or “Is this photo high res enough and can I even use it?” classes. So you gotta coach them and usually the people that have most recently learned outputting are the best at teaching it.

– Alex Wier, Creative Director of Wier / Stewart, advertising agency and creative firm in Augusta, Georgia

Chad Cheek of Elephant in the Room
Chad Cheek of Elephant in the Room

4. Attempting to Fit In

Sometimes young designers have the tendency to come into a firm and try to ‘make their mark’ on the work by working to influence what they perceive as the agency’s design style. I encourage designers to work hard to learn the thinking and problem-solving process that the agency engages in and push the thinking of their own work in that way. They will make their mark by helping to elevate the craft of everyone around them – including their own.

– Chad Cheek, Owner and Managing Director of Elephant in the Room, boutique design agency in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Kyle Eertmoed of Knoed Creative
Kyle Eertmoed of Knoed Creative

5. Feeling too accomplished

When I got my first job out of school, I was so proud of all that I had accomplished – my portfolio that I spent months preparing, graduating college and landing my first job were huge achievements in my life. I felt like I finally arrived at my destination and achieved all my goals.

During the first few months on the job, the big mistake I made was letting all this get to my head. I went into work thinking I needed to impress everyone with my design abilities and knowledge. I thought that being a respected designer and keeping my job was about proving that I was just as good as everyone else working there. But I quickly learned that no one really cared about my accomplishments, and I didn’t know as much as I thought I did.

I believe this is a common experience for a lot of designers, and the root of a lot of unhappiness working as a designer. My advice would be to view every new job as an apprenticeship, a mentorship. You earn respect by respecting others. And as my partner, Kim Knoll likes to say, “A good attitude is just as important as a good portfolio.”  Be positive. Be hungry.

– Kyle Eertmoed, Partner and Designer, Knoed Creative, Branding and Graphic Design Studio in Chicago, Illinois

Chris Harrison of Harrison & Co.
Chris Harrison of Harrison Agency

6. Copying Other Designers

The biggest problem I see in interns and new designers is that they try and emulate other designers – copy their heros and try and ‘be like’ notable/famous designers who are, actually, just ‘being themselves’ (that’s why they are famous and successful). I think this happens because it can look and feel like a short cut to being a better designer, or a designer that’s ‘ready’. It’s the hardest thing to try and find your own point of view. It’s a long path. I’ve been in the game 20+ years, and I think I’m only just starting to hit my stride and understand my own approach, my point of view and what I see as valuable. It does take time, but I really believe that to understand this early on in ones career is important. If it takes years or decades to work though and make progress, that’s OK. Everyone has to start somewhere. And its actually OK not to have a point of view in your work! I know a very successful illustrator who still maintains that she, after 20+ years, doesn’t know herself well enough yet for that point of view to come through. She just has fun with her projects, and that’s her main criteria for taking on work ‘is this going to make me happy?’

– Chris Harrison, Founder, Harrison Agency multidisciplinary creative agency, Brighton, UK

William Beachy of Go Media
William Beachy of Go Media

 7. Letting Your Ego Get In the Way

The following is a bastardized mash-up of Tyler Durden  quotes: “Listen up, maggots. You are not special. You are not your design. Your design is not a beautiful or unique snowflake. You’re not your fucking suspenders and hipster beard. Your professors lied to you. Your clients need to be respected and listened to. Your boss and your co-workers are probably smarter than you. If you’re feeling insecure, good – you should be. When you feel the urge to defend your design, don’t. Shut your mouth and open your ears. Understand that designing is a process and it’s not always going to go the direction you want it to. But don’t feel bad, it could be worse. A woman could cut off your penis while you’re sleeping and toss it out the window of a moving car.”

– William Beachy, President, Go Media, our creative agency here in Cleveland, Ohio

Julia Briggs of Blue Star Design
Julia Briggs of Blue Star Design

8. Forgetting to Prep

Designing is like cooking. You must prep your kitchen before you start. Get out your crop marks, dielines, logos and fonts. Know your paper limitations, mailing needs, budget restrictions and the marketing initiative – BEFORE you do any design.

It’s tempting as a designer to start cooking on a design immediately. But trying to fit a cool design into budget, size and production restrictions after the fact is often a recipe for disaster. At school you are often given the prep work as part of class assignments. Outside of school, you have to learn to extract that information from the client and your vendors at the forefront.

Scope project limitations first, prep your workspace second, and save the design for last.

– Julia Briggs, President of Blue Star Design, an idea design studio specializing in graphic, digital & social design, brand identity, web, marketing & technology solutions in Cleveland, Ohio

________________________________________

Ready to get out there and take the world by storm? Just remember to ditch these 8 bad habits and you’ll be good to go!

What bad habits have you seen in your colleagues? Employees? Share with us in the comments below! And hey, no naming names! 

Design Tools I Can’t Live Without

Tools You Can Use

We asked our favorite designers…what design tools can’t you live without?

I’m a Brazilian graphic and web designer based in San Francisco, California. Currently working for Google, I am also the founder of Abduzeedo,
Fábio Sasso is a Brazilian graphic and web designer based in San Francisco, California. Currently working for Google, he is also the founder of Abduzeedo.

Fábio Sasso:
My Macbook Pro 15 Retina, Moleskine & More

For me, I would say that the most important things are my little Moleskine notepad with a 5.6mm mechanical pencil, my Macbook Pro 15 Retina laptop with headphones and my Nexus 4 phone so I can connect to the Internet. I think with those I can work from anywhere.

Partner at Go Media and founder of Weapons of Mass Creation Fest
Jeff Finley is a partner and design at Go Media and founder of Weapons of Mass Creation Fest

Jeff Finley:
Omnifocus, TeuxDeux, Lift App, VSCO CAM, Instacast & More

Omnifocus – I’ve been using it for two weeks, and it’s officially integrated into my life. It’s the ultimate GTD (Getting Things Done) app. It’s for Mac and iOS only. I love it because any thought or task that enters my mind goes right into the “inbox” which I can review and sort later. All of my todos for my work and life are in Omnifocus inside projects and contexts. At any time I can focus on only things at “work” or “designing” or check out all the things I need to do for my band, WMC fest, home improvement, chores, etc. My life is definitely less stressful knowing any time something comes my way I can put it into Omnifocus and forget about it until it matters. It’s a little on the expensive side, but if you’re into GTD, this is probably the king of GTD apps.

TeuxDeux –  Super simple and well designed todo app. I used this a lot before I integrated Omnifocus into my routine. I like how it carries over todos you didn’t complete for other days and has such a slick and intuitive user interface. Designers would love this. It costs a small monthly fee but it’s worth it.

Lift App – For building habits. A super simple way of staying committed to habits you are trying to start, keep, or quit. Beautiful interface on smartphones and the web. I use this daily to keep track of my morning routines, exercise habits, or other things I want to remember to do daily. But I use this for personal development habits only. You don’t use this to put your todos into. But things like “drink more water” or “cold shower.”  When you do a habit for the day, check it off and move on. It inspires you to keep going by offering encouragement for chaining together multiple days of checking in. It even has a social side where your friends give you “props” for your actions. The social aspect with the dead simple UX make this actually FUN and rewarding to start new habits. It’s  helped me start a morning ritual that has gotten me out of bed 2 hours before I have to!

VSCO CAM: Amazing photo app for iOS. Ever wonder how people get such amazing looking photos from their iPhones? This is how. The best camera app I’ve used and you can send photos directly into Instagram from the app and its filters are better.

Instacast: To listen to all my fav design related podcasts like Adventures in Design and the Go Media podcast of course!  Available on iOS. Not exactly design related, but this is a tool I couldn’t live without!

Others I like: Buffer App, Spotify, Day One for journaling, Evernote, Pocket, Feedly.

Designer at 37signals focused on making good things for good people.
Mig Reyes is a designer at 37signals focused on making good things for good people.

Mig Reyes:
Moom by Many Tricks

Moom: I’m OCD about the software that lives inside of my MacBook Air. So OCD, that I use MooM to make sure all of my application windows are perfectly centered and sized on my screen.

Alex Cornell is a San Francisco-based Designer. A graduate of Duke University, Alex cofounded Firespotter Labs in 2010 and has designed and launched Nosh, Jotly, NoshList and ÜberConference.
Alex Cornell is a San Francisco-based designer. A graduate of Duke University, Alex co-founded Firespotter Labs in 2010 and has designed and launched Nosh, Jotly, NoshList and ÜberConference.

Alex Cornell:
Sketch

My favorite tool these days is Sketch. It’s a vector-based graphics program that is basically Photoshop without all the heft and unnecessary functionality. Perfect for UI/UX designers building apps fast. Not only is it easy to use, it makes exporting for development a lot faster, with built-in tools to export assets and log CSS styling.

Aaron Sechrist is OKPANTS (one word). He has been designing and illustrating for apparel, packaging, branding, broadcast and other projects for clients and agencies since 2002 after graduating from Cleveland Institute of Art.
Aaron Sechrist is OKPANTS. He has been designing and illustrating for apparel, packaging, branding, broadcast and other projects for clients and agencies since 2002 after graduating from Cleveland Institute of Art.

Aaron Sechrist:
Pencil and Paper

The space-age tool I lean on the most and can’t live without is a suite of products conceived by a maverick start-up from parts unknown called “a Faber-Castell HB pencil & 8.5 x 11 text stock paper”. As far away as I might allow myself to get sucked into the vortex of digital technology, I can always trust my Flintstonian pre-wacom technology to ground my ideas and get me back to the proper starting block. I love sketch books and do my best to keep filling them up, but I love the feel and tooth of standard old-fashioned printer paper. I thank the stars for my MacBook and Adobe illustrator, and I love keeping up with the latest and greatest digital stuff, but the ideas don’t “happen” in there. They can’t. Thumbnailing and sketching is the earliest and purest iteration of my ideas. As long as I keep that perspective, things get made, and made the right way.

Illustrator and Go Media extended family member
Steve Knerem is an Illustrator and Go Media extended family member

Steve Knerem:
WACOM Intuos 5, etc.

When hand drawing work, I use copy paper for sketches, 100# Bristol paper for final art, rubber eraser, Bic#2  .07 pencil, tuff stuff eraser stick, Micron pens and a Drum scanner at Fed Ex Office to scan in final art.  These tools have become part of my system; I have felt comfortable with this system over the past 5+ years and use it to get the final results. I am at the point if I don’t have these specific items I’M LOST!

When drawing vectors , I use WACOM Intuos 5 using Illustrator and Photoshop. When drawing vectors I draw my image on paper, then scan it into Photoshop, then throw it into Illustrator. I am so used to drawing by hand that I need to see my own line art before I can create it into a vector image. This way, I know I am getting results closest to my hand drawn style.

Michael Flarup is a designer based out of cosy Copenhagen, Denmark.
Michael Flarup is a designer based out of cosy Copenhagen, Denmark.

Michael Flarup
Wacom Cintiq 22HD, Logitech Mouse, Mac, Dropbox & More

Wacom Cintiq 22HD: I use this to sketch out and brush up things in Photoshop. Having the ability to draw directly on the screen really merges the physicality of drawing with the benefits of digital design. I use this both in the initial phases of playing with concepts and sometimes in the final stages of icon design when I work with lighting and color.

My Logitech G9x mouse: Most of my day is used with a hand on a mouse, both during work and play. I’ve been using the G9 mouse from Logitech for the past 6 years, and I must have gone through at least a couple of them. Initially build for gaming, they offer great precision, a nice fit and the ability to load up weights to get the exact surface resistance you want.

My Macs: I realize that it might be redundant to mention this, as my Macs aren’t a questions of favorability but rather a necessity for my work. I interchangeably use my Mac Pro setup at home and my Macbook Pro Retina when I’m working remotely. I guess they do fit the bill of tools that I can’t live without.

Dropbox: Working on multiple machines, often changing workstations a couple of times a day, Dropbox has become my go-to service for keeping my files synced up. Working with large PSD files and making sure that I always have access to the most current iteration of a project is a large part of the challenges a designer faces. Dropbox helps me solve this in an elegant way.

Mail Act-on and Inbox Zero: As a business owner, a substantial amount of my time is spent getting back to people. As such, making sure that I’m on top of my inbox easily becomes a focal point of my workday. The plugin Mail Act-on helps me direct the flow of my incoming messages and helps me exercise my email Kung-Fu so I have to spend less time in Mail.app and more time in Photoshop.

President of Go Media
President of Go Media, Designer

William Beachy:
Pencil and iPad Sketching Tools

A pencil: while it may not be cool, new or innovative, it’s worth mentioning in this world of computers, tablets and Wacoms. The pencil and paper is STILL the fastest way to communicate an idea visually. Not enough designers use it. As I enter my 16th professional year as a graphic designer, I am sketching more now than ever.”

Also, iPad sketching tools – Layers, Bamboo and Paper are all great tools for quickly sketching ideas during client meetings.

Dan resides in Brooklyn and currently leads a team of designers and animators as Creative Director at Tribeca Enterprises which includes Tribeca Film Festival & Tribeca Film.
Dan Dickson resides in Brooklyn and currently leads a team of designers and animators as Creative Director at Tribeca Enterprises which includes Tribeca Film Festival & Tribeca Film.

Dan Dickson
Classic Sport Rollerball Pen, Wacom Tablet & More

I use a Classic Sport Rollerball Pen when taking notes or sketching or looking stylish.

I also use Dropbox, digital storage which keeps my pockets light and my Wacom Tablet.

And Bienfang Marker paper – I think i’m the only one who still uses these pads!

Len Peralta draws monsters, robots, zombies and so much more. He has illustrated several books including “There’s A Zombie In My Treehouse” by John “Widgett” Robinson and Ken Plume, “Silly Rhymes For Belligerent Children” written by MST3K/Cinematic Titanic’s Trace Beaulieu and “Look” by Robert Bowling. He has also worked on projects for Discovery Channel, MythBusters and Steve Jackson Games.
Len Peralta draws monsters, robots, zombies and so much more. He has illustrated several books including “There’s A Zombie In My Treehouse” by John “Widgett” Robinson and Ken Plume, “Silly Rhymes For Belligerent Children” written by MST3K/Cinematic Titanic’s Trace Beaulieu and “Look” by Robert Bowling. He has also worked on projects for Discovery Channel, MythBusters and Steve Jackson Games.

Len Peralta:
Brush Packs

Deviant Art Brush Pack: I was made aware of this fantastic brush pack  by artist Megan Lara, and it has become my go-to staple pack for pretty much all my design projects. These are great brushes that actually behave the way you expect and want them to. They have become an invaluable tool in my arsenal. Plus, it’s free!”

I bought the VFX WorkShops Digital Painting Brush Pack  on a whim just to try them out, and they have become an everyday tool I use to build a lot of my environmental textures. Great brushes with a lot of versatility and depth and they can really help bring your digital work to life.

_________________________

What are your favorite design tools?  Please comment below!

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How the Design Workflow is Changing

Once upon a time, there was a method of design that involved plenty of time for brainstorming and upfront big picture planning. Designers could meet with all interested parties, puzzle over design challenges, and play with problems until they’d found a (theoretical) solution.

But that approach to design workflow has been largely relegated to the history books—some would say, for the betterment of all. As the development world has embraced the Agile process with systems like scrums and big data analytics, designers find themselves under increasing pressure to iterate quickly, rather than spending lots of time planning for project demands that are highly likely to change just a week or even a day after the plan is finally set. This sounds to many experienced designers like it’s anathema to the creative process, and it can be, if we try to adapt Agile development practices wholesale, without tweaking them to fit the design workflow or mentality.

Conversely, the many designers who do make Agile their own find it can actually be a boon for creativity, forcing them out of productivity-deadening perfectionism and keeping them on their toes as they try to meet changing constraints. How are these designers embracing the more dynamic Agile approach to workflow while still holding strong to the more static elements of the design process that keep them surefooted and on solid ground? Let’s take a look at a few key approaches from beginning to end.

1. Start and End With the Client

style-tiles

We’re all familiar with those nightmare clients who call five times a day. We all also know the frustration of the client who says, “I don’t know” and “Sure,” to everything, only to decide upon seeing the finished product that it’s, “Not quite right.” While there’s no catch all solution for these kinds of difficulties, there’s a lot that can be done when you adopt the agile mentality of taking the client on almost as a team member. That means giving them a constant stream of deliverables, even if it’s something small, and communicating feedback to the rest of the team during your daily or weekly stand up meetings so you can adjust accordingly. Clients can also be helpful in maintaining that on-brand feel, as well as in testing any prototypes or clarifying just what the demands of the job entail as they see it all come together.

To do this, you may want to assign a liaison between you and the client to handle the bulk of customer feedback, so you can focus on design work. It’s also important to shift away both from static, labor intensive PSD mockups of pages that you may have to radically change or decide not to make at all, as well as from mood boards, which are often too vague to be of any help. Instead, try using a tool like Style Tiles, which will enable you to produce the smaller deliverables like fonts, colors and page elements, that will form the basis of your site design, rather than focusing on that static bigger picture. Style tiles can be used throughout the process, from visual brainstorms to the many adjustments that need to be made throughout every iteration. What’s more, you can use style tiles to combine elements across each tile, so you can constantly adjust and merge looks.

2. Do the Heavy Lifting Before a Project “Begins”

If you hadn’t guessed it already, there’s just no time in the Agile design process to spend a good 15 hours producing a PSD mockup, especially if it doesn’t lead to a workable product in the end (and it often doesn’t). In contrast, designing extensive style guides during the brainstorming process can provide the best kind of jumping off point. In saying this, I’m not referring to those basic, brand style guides, but instead to coded style guides that are devoted to page elements, like buttons, typography, headers and so forth. Once coded, these page elements not only give the client a much better sense of the product, but they’re also a lot easier to implement when the designer does begin work on the “true” product, i.e. landing pages. A coded style guide will allow you to easily change your design as you go, without having those heart stopping, “This isn’t what I asked for” moments at the end of a project. In essence, this means shifting from top down to bottom up design.

style-guide

3. Iterate Frequently, But Don’t Lose Sight of the Big Picture

Ready. Set. Iterate! Two of the most commonly implemented and famous elements of Agile are iterations and sprint planning. During each iteration, design teams limit themselves to achieving a set of achievable goals, which they’ll then pursue with singular intensity. This folds in nicely with the concept of constantly delivering products to the client, as each iteration should produce something to present, no matter how unpolished.

A common (and well-justified) complaint amongst designers about the iterative process is that it becomes hyper-localized, so that the big picture becomes murky. This is one area where designers can really benefit from breaking a little bit away from the classic Agile development process with design spikes. When a design spike is called, all work on anything that would be dependent on the spike ceases, and one designer is elevated to “owner” to stand alongside the product owner. New team members can be brought on if their perspective would be useful, but the most important part of the idea is that it ceases all action until this bigger issue or viewpoint is fixed or achieved.

Another effective strategy is to adopt at least the philosophy behind the development process continuous integration, in which developers constantly integrate their work, rather than waiting until the product is done to fix a huge backlog of unforeseen bugs. Similarly, designers can keep that bigger picture in mind by constantly integrating their work across the design team, and testing elements as they go.

4. Evaluate Your Efforts

The Agile design process can be highly effective, but only if you’ve got your strategies done. Implemented the wrong way, Agile can be more distracting and anxiety-inducing than anything else, leading to far lower productivity rates than the classic Waterfall method. At the end of a project, or perhaps even at the end of every iteration, take the time to evaluate how your implementation of Agile is going, and whether or not any tweaks need to be made. Of course, you’ll also need to evaluate your design efforts, so that you can properly adjust your backlog and add the most appropriate new tasks into the next iteration.

Final Thoughts

There’s no getting around it: Agile is taking the development world by storm. Whether that makes your little designer heart jump for joy or it makes your blood boil, it’s a reality we all have to face if we’re going to continue working hand in hand with developers. The best thing we can do is embrace these changes and make them work for what designers actually do. And who knows? You might just find yourself creatively unlocked as you go.

Daily Inspiration: Patience

Daily Inspiration Videos by Go Media President Bill Beachy

Go Media president Bill Beachy sits down to give you some daily inspiration and advice. Bill shares his years of experience building Go Media into the company it is today. Topics in this video series include Getting Started, Happiness, Humility, Patience, Flow, Focus, Productivity, Business Systems, Courage, Eating Well, Obstacles, and Creativity.

For more information about Bill Beachy, check out his bio on gomedia.us. Bill is currently accepting opportunities to speak at your event, university, or business.

View all episodes of Daily Inspiration here

Sponsored by Prooflab
The Daily Inspiration video series is brought to you by Prooflab – a client and project management app built and used by Go Media for designers.

Proolab - the best client and project management app for designers

Hope you enjoy the video!

Or download the podcast

[powerpress]

Daily Inspiration: Go with the Flow

Daily Inspiration Videos by Go Media President Bill Beachy

Go Media president Bill Beachy sits down to give you some daily inspiration and advice. Bill shares his years of experience building Go Media into the company it is today. Topics in this video series include Getting Started, Happiness, Humility, Patience, Flow, Focus, Productivity, Business Systems, Courage, Eating Well, Obstacles, and Creativity.

For more information about Bill Beachy, check out his bio on gomedia.us. Bill is currently accepting opportunities to speak at your event, university, or business.

View all episodes of Daily Inspiration here

Sponsored by Prooflab
The Daily Inspiration video series is brought to you by Prooflab – a client and project management app built and used by Go Media for designers.

Proolab - the best client and project management app for designers

Hope you enjoy the video!

Or download the podcast

[powerpress]

Daily Inspiration: Battling a Business Lull

Daily Inspiration Videos by Go Media President Bill Beachy

Go Media president Bill Beachy sits down to give you some daily inspiration and advice. Bill shares his years of experience building Go Media into the company it is today. Topics in this video series include Getting Started, Happiness, Humility, Patience, Flow, Focus, Productivity, Business Systems, Courage, Eating Well, Obstacles, and Creativity.

For more information about Bill Beachy, check out his bio on gomedia.us. Bill is currently accepting opportunities to speak at your event, university, or business.

View all episodes of Daily Inspiration here

Sponsored by Prooflab
The Daily Inspiration video series is brought to you by Prooflab – a client and project management app built and used by Go Media for designers.

Proolab - the best client and project management app for designers

Hope you enjoy the video!

Or download the podcast

[powerpress]

Daily Inspiration: When You’re Down, Just Focus

Daily Inspiration Videos by Go Media President Bill Beachy

Go Media president Bill Beachy sits down to give you some daily inspiration and advice. Bill shares his years of experience building Go Media into the company it is today. Topics in this video series include Getting Started, Happiness, Humility, Patience, Flow, Focus, Productivity, Business Systems, Courage, Eating Well, Obstacles, and Creativity.

For more information about Bill Beachy, check out his bio on gomedia.us. Bill is currently accepting opportunities to speak at your event, university, or business.

View all episodes of Daily Inspiration here

Sponsored by Prooflab
The Daily Inspiration video series is brought to you by Prooflab – a client and project management app built and used by Go Media for designers.

Proolab - the best client and project management app for designers

Hope you enjoy the video!

Or download the podcast

[powerpress]

Daily Inspiration: Practice, Practice, Practice.

Daily Inspiration Videos by Go Media President Bill Beachy

Go Media president Bill Beachy sits down to give you some daily inspiration and advice. Bill shares his years of experience building Go Media into the company it is today. Topics in this video series include Getting Started, Happiness, Humility, Patience, Flow, Focus, Productivity, Business Systems, Courage, Eating Well, Obstacles, and Creativity.

For more information about Bill Beachy, check out his bio on gomedia.us. Bill is currently accepting opportunities to speak at your event, university, or business.

View all episodes of Daily Inspiration here

Sponsored by Prooflab
The Daily Inspiration video series is brought to you by Prooflab – a client and project management app built and used by Go Media for designers.

Proolab - the best client and project management app for designers

Hope you enjoy the video!

Or download the podcast

[powerpress]

Daily Inspiration: Humility is not Complacency

Go Media president Bill Beachy sits down to give you some daily inspiration and advice. Bill shares his years of experience building Go Media into the company it is today. Topics in this video series include Getting Started, Happiness, Humility, Patience, Flow, Focus, Productivity, Business Systems, Courage, Eating Well, Obstacles, and Creativity.

For more information about Bill Beachy, check out his bio on gomedia.us. Bill is currently accepting opportunities to speak at your event, university, or business.

View all episodes of Daily Inspiration here

Sponsored by Prooflab
The Daily Inspiration video series is brought to you by Prooflab – a client and project management app built and used by Go Media for designers.

Proolab - the best client and project management app for designers

Hope you enjoy the video!

Or download the podcast

[powerpress]

Daily Inspiration: Happiness is a Choice

Daily Inspiration Videos by Go Media President Bill Beachy

Go Media president Bill Beachy sits down to give you some daily inspiration and advice. Bill shares his years of experience building Go Media into the company it is today. Topics in this video series include Getting Started, Happiness, Humility, Patience, Flow, Focus, Productivity, Business Systems, Courage, Eating Well, Obstacles, and Creativity.

For more information about Bill Beachy, check out his bio on gomedia.us. Bill is currently accepting opportunities to speak at your event, university, or business.

View all episodes of Daily Inspiration here

Sponsored by Weapons of Mass Creation
The Daily Inspiration video series is brought to you by WMC Fest – a grassroots event put on by Go Media to inspire and enable the creative mind. It takes place in Cleveland, OH on June 11 and 12, 2011 (this weekend!) and will feature 20 speakers, 20 bands, and 20 designers in what aims to be the premier event for artists/designers in the midwest.

Weapons of Mass Creation Fest is in Cleveland, OH

Hope you enjoy the video!

Or download the podcast

[powerpress]