graphic design portfolio examples

Graphic Design Portfolio Examples to Inspire You + Important Tips

Newly graduated? Actively seeking employment in the field? Super comfortable in your current position?

No matter what your status, the Go Media team suggests you regularly work to keep your design portfolio up-to-date.

Seasoned designers, we know that this task may seem daunting. However, in order to show beautiful work, you simply have to put the time in. Being methodical about adding work is far easier and more effective, in our view. Slow and steady always wins the race.

We have launched a couple blog posts about what your design portfolio should include. They are:

How to Have the Best Graphic Design Portfolio on the Block: 3 Tips and
How to Create a Graphic Design Portfolio 

Here are five of our most important tips.

  1. Only show your very best work. Your portfolio should be well curated. Less is often more.
  2. Cover all of your bases. If you have excellent work in branding, print, web, illustration, show us. Well-rounded designers are few and far between.
  3. Tell us a story. We love case studies! Show us your thought process from start to finish. Include illustrations, notes and various rounds. Address failures & successes along the way. We love to see how designers move throughout the design process. No matter what the outcome, we will respect you for guiding us along your path.
  4. Put as much time into your portfolio as you did completing the project. If you took eight hours to create a logo for a client, take roughly eight hours to work on that respective portfolio item. Dedicate yourself to mocking the logo up on multiple templates until they look perfect. Write, rewrite, proofread the copy to go along with your portfolio item. Construct a thorough case study as referenced above. If your logo appears in a store, restaurant or other location, go out and photograph it! Take time editing the photos so that they are professional in quality. Gather testimonials on your work if possible. Don’t stop until you’re proud.
  5. Show that you can work with clients & meet deadlines. Students, this one is for you. If you have not yet had experience in the field, ask your friends and family if they need any design work. This will get you some freelance work in the door and show us that you have experience, no matter how minor, working for clients. Get ready to illustrate the work you’ve done in your portfolio, as well as discuss how you communicated with them and managed to meet important deadlines.

Here are some portfolios that have inspired us with notes about why we enjoy them.

Ekaterina Oloy
Los Angeles Based Illustrator, Artist and Visual Storyteller
What We Love: Katia’s Portfolio is instantly spellbinding. Each project is accompanied by a full case study or accompanying materials that help you relate to Katia’s
work. This is the standard that all other portfolio’s should be judged against.

Skinny Ships
Design and Illustration by Richard Perez and Jennifer Derosa
What We Love: The cleanliness and fun spirit of the work. It makes you want to work with them.

Hom Sweet Hom
Hand Lettering by Lauren Hom
What We Love: High-quality, vibrant work that hits you in the face!
Great brand consistency

 

Ron Draper
Artist and Designer living in the UK
What We Love: Nice high-quality, bold imagery. Some portfolio items tell a story of Ron’s process.

Jordan Metcalf Studio
South African Graphic Designer
We love Jordan’s copy. As you know, we love a story and it gives more substance to his work.


Chuck Anderson
No Pattern Studio – Chuck Anderson
Artist, Graphic Designer, Photographer, Creative Director
What We Love: Chuck’s Portfolio is filled with over-sized, juicy imagery.
The quality of his presentation, in our opinion, is simply on another level.

Kate Moross
Designer
What We Love: Kate’s bold and captivating presentation

Erik Marinkovich
Lettering Artist and Designer
What We Love: Clean and crisp overall. The work is breathtaking! Copy is simple and straightforward.

Creative Mints
A Boutique Human-Centered Design Agency from Prague
specializing in Branding, UI and Illustration
What We Love: Creative Mints shows a beautiful variety of work in their portfolio

Go Media’s Online Portfolio
We couldn’t let you leave without bragging about our own graphic design portfolio!
Here at our Cleveland Graphic Design and Web Development Firm, we love showing off the work we do in the areas of not only design and web, but print, illustration and web marketing.

Our Rich Wonder portfolio item is a great example of one of our case studies. We used illustration to help us
explain our thought process through the project.

We hope you enjoyed this post and it inspired you to add to your portfolio today!

Rock Medical Orthopedic Website and Branding by Go Media

Portfolio Spotlight: Rock Medical Branding & Website

Project Spotlight: Without Bounds

We are excited to share the website design we completed for Without Bounds Educational Services, a phenomenal education service that provides young students with the tutoring they need to master concepts and prepare for exams. They work with the most talented and qualified educators to offer tutoring in over 25 subjects. From core classes like Algebra and Grammar to 4 levels of foreign language, Without Bounds is ready to take on the unique needs of every student.

Go Media had the pleasure of helping Without Bounds grow their network by designing a website that showcased all of their offerings on a contemporary responsive platform.

Here are a few previews of the work we did. To view the full project, head to the full project.

View Live Site

Responsive Website Design Cleveland

Icon Design

View Full Project

how to get hired as a graphic designer

How to Get Hired to Do the Design Work You Want to Do

How to Get Hired as a Graphic Designer
(to Do the Work You Want to Do)

When going through the hiring process here at Go Media, we see a lot of portfolios. Some are good, some are bad, very few make us stop and say…”wow, okay!”

The portfolios that really stand out to us are strong in branding, print design and web development, have a bit of edge, and hint at a background or strength in illustration. Why? Because we want to find a designer that:

  1. Is passionate about the same type of work we do.
  2. Is stylistically similar to us, but still has range.
  3. Is psyched about using the same programs as we are.

Really want to work at ____ << dream company here (for purposes of this article, we’ll call it Go Media!)

We want it to feel like your portfolio was created with us in mind. Whether that means removing pages from a physical portfolio or modifying  your website for this particular job search, it’s time to make some necessary adjustments that will seriously make our heads turn. If this sounds like it will take a lot of extra time and effort, you’re correct. But, it’s worth it.

Here are our recommendations in regards to your portfolio:

MIRROR OUR PASSIONS – BECAUSE YOU SHARE THEM

As you may have heard us preach, you MUST do your homework about Go Media and know our company  inside and out. It will take hours to truly understand our services, as well as our history.  As mentioned above, Go Media has a strong background in illustration. So, when designers open up their portfolios, show off their illustration skills and refer to our history, we are really wowed. Without doing any research, however, you will likely miss this important bit of history altogether and miss out on some great conversation with us. And quite possibly, a position here at the company.

PAIR DOWN, SHOW RANGE

After you’ve come to understand our major service areas, you should start to pair down your work to match ours. Once you have narrowed down your portfolio to your strongest print, branding and web projects, you can leave the watercolor painting work you do in your free time to the wayside. It just starts to clutter things up.

From there, show us a sample of what you do best while simultaneously showing range. Illustrate the fact that you can work with any client we throw at you, from gritty, down-home BBQ restaurant, to a quaint cupcake shop, to a biker bar, to the world’s largest healthcare center.

SHOW US THAT YOU’RE VERSATILE

We really like our designers to show that they have a wealth of knowledge working in many different programs. One reason is that we need designers to work in specific programs for very specific reasons. (For example, we need designers who are experts in Photoshop that can work on our mockup templates.) Another reason is that we want to ensure that we can all work on and in the same files if needed. Use your portfolio/case studies as a vehicle to show us that you are comfortable in Adobe Creative Suite and other programs if applicable.

At the end of the day, in order to get hired as a graphic designer here at Go Media – to do to work you want to do and truly love to do, all you need to do is to show us the work you want to be doing through your portfolio and, in person, a real fire and passion for that work.

And don’t forget to leave out any work that distracts us from seeing the designer that deserves a seat at our table. Good luck!

Free iPhone 7 Mockup

Download our Free iPhone 7 Mockup Templates Pack!

Yep, a totally free iPhone 7 Mockup Templates Pack

We just launched a free iPhone 7 Mockup Templates Pack, so what are you waiting for? Go download it now over on the Arsenal, the home of the World’s Best Mockup Templates, Vectors, Textures and more.

This Free iPhone 7 mockup templates pack includes two mockup templates that will help you show off your website/app in a realistic way. The pack includes an iPhone 7 in both flat and angled versions and includes the different options listed below. These mockups have assisted us in pulling our portfolio together and hope they will do the same for you.

Take me to the free pack!

Here are the various options our iPhone 7 Mockup Templates Pack give you:

  • iPhone 7 Flat
  • iPhone 7 Flat (with hand)
  • iPhone 7 with backgrounds (with or without hand) with backgrounds – modern office space, desktop workspace, coffee shop, park outside
  • iPhone 7 Angled
  • iPhone 7 Angled (with hand)
  • iPhone 7 Angled (with or without hand) with backgrounds – modern office space, desktop workspace, coffee shop, park outside

Obsessed with our mockups and want more? Become a member for only $15 a month and access them all, plus the rest of our library, instantly! Learn all about that now.

Take me to the free pack!

Graphic Design Portfolio Tips

How to Have the Best Graphic Design Portfolio on the Block: 3 Tips

Graphic Design Portfolio Tips by Go Media –

Hello Go Media Faithful! Hunting for your dream job? The last two weeks we’ve been discussing the resources you need to submit in order to gain the attention of your dream design firm. If you missed part one and two of this series, please go back and read them before proceeding:

The Magic Element to Include in the Best Graphic Design Cover Letter Ever
Please Avoid Making these Mistakes We Often See on Design Resumes

Now that you’re a pro at cover letters and resumes, let’s move on to part three of your submission to the graphic design studio of your dreams – the portfolio.

Here are three graphic design portfolio tips we need you to learn and embrace now (from the boss, Bill Beachy, himself):

Slow down and nail your presentation. Many young designers do good design work… then spend very little effort putting it together into a BEAUTIFUL portfolio post. The project is done, you’re eager to move on – so you throw a few images online for the portfolio. STOP. SLOW DOWN. THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF LANDING A JOB – a B-E-A-U-T-I-F-U-L portfolio. Take the extra time to write about, mock-up and present the work you’ve done in the most flattering way possible. You SHOULD find yourself doing EXTRA design work as you prepare your portfolio post. Once you have a project that’s moving in a pretty direction that you’re happy with – KEEP GOING… don’t stop until you have all the pieces and parts to present a beautiful portfolio post.

Consider this… you may have just spent several weeks designing something. Now… you should spend at least several days preparing it as beautifully as possible to show off.

You must have an online portfolio. This does not mean that you have to be a web developer. You can use SquareSpace, Wix, Coroflot, a WordPress Template – really anything. An employer just needs to know you’re living in the 21st century. If you have the dev skills to build your own website, that would be best – HOWEVER don’t post your beautiful portfolio on an ugly website! If you’re going to post your portfolio onto a website you built – it better be as beautiful as the items IN the portfolio. The last thing you want to do is distract your potential employer by putting good portfolio work onto an ugly website. Make sure wherever you put your portfolio – it’s not distracting. If you want to show off your dev skills, but they’re not portfolio worthy – just do that somewhere else.

Your online portfolio must be a match set to your resume and cover letter – and must be GOOD. I would err on the side of good over self-built. If your web dev skills are not portfolio worthy yet, then don’t rely on them to show off your work.

Show a variety of work types. It’s important that your portfolio demonstrates your ability to do a variety of things. Obviously, you’ll want to show your ability to do the type of work that matches up with the work the firm you’re applying to does. In Go Media’s case, that would be: branding (logo design), print design and web design. I recommend including your 3 best samples of work in each design category. You don’t need to have a huge portfolio, but whatever is in there needs to be your very best work! Err on the side of showing less work of higher quality than having a big portfolio where some of the pieces are only so-so. An employer is going to pick out the worst thing in your portfolio and assume all your work will be that bad. So, it’s kind of like the saying: “A chain is only as strong as it’s weakest link.” So, if you have doubts about anything in your portfolio, get it out of there.

Side note: If you think you can only show one style of design and tell clients: “take it or leave it…” I’m telling you right now – 99% of clients and employers will leave it. You need to be more adaptable than that. When a client hires you, you need to be making designs that are appropriate to that client, not just designs that you like. When I come across candidates that have extremely homogeneous portfolios I give them two radical jobs: Design branding and promotional materials for Metallica (sponsored by Monster Energy Beverage) and design branding, signage and promotional materials for a cupcake shop that is owned by Hello Kitty. These two hypothetical projects will force a designer to push their style to extreme ends of the style spectrum. You can invent your own projects, the point is to demonstrate a wide range of styles in your portfolio.

Alrighty, so some of you may have a lot of work to do before submitting your cover letter, resume and portfolio to your dream job. These may include things like –

  • Researching your dream design firm inside and out, outside and in
  • Scratching that Word doc in favor of a beautifully designed resume and cover letter
  • Designing your own personal brand
  • Improving upon your website (online portfolio), carrying your personal branding over to that
  • Thinking strategically about what you need in your portfolio and working toward those goals
  • Adding more work to your portfolio

Yes, this may seem overwhelming, but when you take all of these tasks step by step, you’ll be happy you did. And believe us, so will your future employer. Best of luck, everyone!

Please Avoid Making These Mistakes We Often See on Design Resumes

Please Avoid Making These Design Resume Mistakes

Hello job seekers! We’re back to talk about what it takes to get the dream design job you’re after. Last week, we discussed, “The Magic Element to Include in Best Graphic Design Cover Letter Ever.” If you missed the post, please go back and check it out.

Today, we’re moving on to part two of your submission to the graphic design studio of your dreams – the resume. Before we go on, quick note: We highly recommend applying to companies you’re interested in working for even if they’re not advertising any open positions. Some companies get so many applicants that they don’t advertise. Some companies may not be hiring, but if a strong candidate comes to them and says: “Hey – I ONLY want to work for YOU.” they may consider it. It can’t hurt right? Right.

Okay, let’s get into it! Here are a few mistakes we see quite often on design resumes, as told by our President, William Beachy:

Failing to design your resume and cover letter. Shockingly, this is frequently not done. Many designers use a basic Word resume template. A candidate once told me that their design professor specifically told them to use a plain-jane Word template. I’m not sure where this professor got their information from (maybe the year 1950), but I think that professor was wrong. Your resume, cover letter and web-portfolio need to be a perfectly matched set, and they should be as pretty as everything in your portfolio. As I said before, this is the FIRST IMPRESSION you’re giving your potential employer. Make it shine!

When designing your resume, don’t be afraid of getting creative! Bold type and infographics can be a plus – so long as they are handled well. A concept behind your application is also a plus. I had an applicant give me a resume that was a ‘Top Ten’ list. Specifically, it said: “Top ten reasons you should hire me.” Then she creatively worked all her education and experience into a list of ten items.

Rating your skill level on various software. I see this constantly. It says something like: Illustrator 90% | Photoshop 95% | Word 85%. What does that even mean? Is there a standardized test that I’m not aware of? It’s funniest when I see stats like this, but the applicant’s portfolio sucks. First of all, I’ve been using Illustrator for 20+ years and I’m only at maybe 85% proficient with it. So, how are you – a student who is just graduating at 90%. The simple fact is this means nothing. Don’t try to put a stat to how proficient you are in your software knowledge. The employer will know exactly how proficient you are based on the quality of the work in your portfolio. Instead a simple list of software you know how to use with no additional qualifiers is fine.

Adding extra fluff. Remove any and all work experience that is not art or design related. The fact that you taught kids martial arts is great, but I prefer my candidates come across like their entire life is focused on art and design. You can imagine my feelings when I see a resume that says: “McDonalds (cook), Progressive (insurance salesman), Lincoln Electric (assembly), Chipotle (cook), Freelance Designer.” It paints a picture of someone who has not been focused on design! This candidate would be better off if they left off ALL their previous experiences, and just said: Freelance Designer.

Now obviously, if this topic is brought up in an interview… do not lie! Tell them all about the other previous work experiences you’ve had and what you learned from them and how those will apply to your new position. And if they ask why those were left off your resume, just say: “I didn’t think those jobs were applicable to this position.”

With this approach… they think of you as a DESIGNER FIRST… who has some other life experiences… as compared to a resume that makes you look like an EVERYTHING ELSE FIRST… oh… and with a little design experience too.

See the difference in that?

Ok, now that we’ve covered our mistakes to avoid on design resumes, promise us you’ll do your best to do so.

Stay tuned, as next week we’ll be back with our favorite rules about creating the best design portfolio ever.

how to write the best graphic design cover letter

The Magic Element to Include in the Best Graphic Design Cover Letter Ever

How to Write the Best Graphic Design Cover Letter

If you want the job at the best graphic design firm ever, you have to submit the best cover letter, resume and portfolio ever, know about Sherwood Universal are the experts in Digital Printing, Litho Printing and Large Format Printing in Nottingham. Through continual investment in both our printing equipment and our people, our customer can benefit from both state of the art equipment and a team of highly experienced printing specialists. (We’ll leave the bits about being a worthy designer to another post.)

And with no shortage of resources on what makes a great cover letter, resume and portfolio out there, this should be a somewhat simple feat. But here at Go Media, we are disappointed to see the same mistakes made over and over again. It often seems like applicants choose to apply for more jobs – the quantity – over quality (in other words, doing a thorough job of applying to fewer companies). In this three part series, we talk about the elements in cover letters, resumes and portfolios that really make our jaws drop.

To start, we’d like to address cover letters. Above all, there is one element that most good applicants touch upon, but often do not take the time to cover with enough depth and passion. This aspect makes all the difference between a cover letter worth passing by, and one worth paying attention to.

What is this magic element?

A SECTION THAT SERIOUSLY PLAYS TO OUR EGO.

Sounds simple, right? Far from it.
It takes time and a ton of time, which is why we rarely see it. Please read on!

In the cover letter, it’s critical that you communicate to the potential employer: “You are the only company I am applying for, I’ve been following your company for years.” You want to play into the ego of the company. In order to communicate this you need a plausible story. Most importantly, you need more FACTS about the company you’re applying to. So, this means research! Referencing a few portfolio items is a fine start, but anyone can do that in 10 seconds.

If you REALLY want to wow the potential employer, spend several days (even weeks if necessary) reading anything you can get your hands on about them. This may sound like a huge investment, but consider this – you’re about to commit to working there for YEARS. Isn’t a week of research worth getting into the right company?

If they wrote a book – read it. If they have a blog, read every article you can on the history of the company. About page? Read it. Then, write a concise ‘How I got to know your company’ story… If you can find any gem in your research to reference you can say things like: “I read in your book that you used to lay on the floor drawing with crayons all day as a kid. That’s exactly how I spent my childhood.”

Basically, you need to make sure they know you KNOW them… you did your research. You desperately want to work for them and them only. Sprinkling in a few obscure facts will help communicate this.

As an employer it’s VERY clear to us who’s done their research and who is just throwing out a generic cover letter. Pandering to our ego works. We want to think that the people I’m hiring are HUGE Go Media fans! Of course! We love hearing their stories about how they discovered our company and have been following us for years. When they reference specific tutorials we wrote 8 years ago, we think: “Wow. This is going to be a loyal employee!”

how to write the best graphic design cover letter

Similarly, continue to blow us out of the water if you’re able to illustrate actionable ways in which you’ve shown your love for the company. Have you volunteered for our design conference, benefit shows, or attended every single one of our open houses? Let us know!

Also, Answer the why

Next, explain WHY you want to work for the company you’re applying to. The reason should be specific. Something like: “Your firm has a background in illustration and I can see that you appreciate art. This is unique compared to the other firms I’ve considered applying to. I love the balance of artistry with design – it’s something I’ve always done. It’s important to me that I’m working in an environment that has that appreciation for the artistic side of design.” Again, you are not only giving the reason why, but you’re reinforcing that you have a deep knowledge of the company you’re applying to. This ties everything together eloquently while making us feel warm and fuzzy.

While you’re at it, here are things to avoid doing in your cover letter:

  • Not addressing anyone specifically. Never write “Dear Hiring manager” or “To whom it may concern”. Do your research! Figure out who’s hiring and write to them specifically!
  • Sending before having trusted friends and family proofread it again and again. Watch your spelling! Attention to details is critical. One error here can knock you out of the game completely.
  • Using your email as the cover letter itself. Design a cover letter that you save along with your resume and attach. It’s ok if what you write in your email is exactly the same as the attached pdf. The point is – I want to see you apply the same branding from your resume onto a cover letter page, and then again on the website. If you don’t attach a designed cover letter you’re losing that opportunity.
  • Praising your own design skills, i.e. “I’m a VERY talented designer.” This simply comes across as arrogant. Whether you are talented or not will show up in your portfolio. Saying you’re good ONLY WORKS AGAINST YOU. If you want to praise yourself in any way – it should be: “I work hard, I’m eager to learn and I have a positive attitude.” These are things that cannot be seen in a portfolio. And these ARE traits that a potential employer is looking for – not arrogance or overconfidence.
  • Giving your potential employer work. Saying things like: “To download my resume go here…” is very bad. Make hiring you as simple as possible. I recommend attaching a finished designed cover letter (which may contain the same text that you included in the e-mail), your resume and a pdf of your portfolio and or a link to an online portfolio.
  • Saying you want this job as a jumping off point for completely different. The last thing we want to hear is that you’re applying to be a Junior Designer, only to turn into a Project Manager in another 6 months. We will support your hopes and dreams, but we are looking to fill the position of a Junior Designer now. If you’re actually looking for a Project Management position, please look elsewhere.

Okay, now that we’ve covered our number one must follow rule and these important don’ts, promise us you’ll dedicate the time your cover letter (and future employer) deserves.

Graphic designers can get an instant remote access to their essential graphic designing software such as Adobe Illustrator and any more on their remotely accessible virtual PCs from CloudDesktopOnline.com with 24*7 commendable technical support from Apps4Rent.

Stay tuned, when next week we’ll be back with our favorite rules about creating the best design resume ever >
Please Avoid Making these Mistakes We Often See on Design Resumes

Here’s What You Need to Know About Creating an Outstanding Online Portfolio

How to Create a Graphic Design Portfolio

An outstanding online portfolio is a must for any creative. Believe us, it’s true. When popping open emails from those applying for graphic design positions here at Cleveland design studio Go Media, we’re often shocked at the number of folks who do not have an online portfolio, or have one that’s outdated or terribly underwhelming. Today, let’s all make a commitment to ourselves. It’s time to up our game. It’s well worth the time and energy. And it just may land you the job of your dreams.

How to Create a Graphic Design Portfolio: Do’s and Don’ts

Strongly and clearly show off your skill set through curated examples of your work. Are you an illustrator and a trained photographer? Or an illustrator who takes iPhone photos for fun? If you’re the latter, leave the photos for Instagram and focus on what you do best. Be forthright with a potential employer regarding your skillset so that there is no confusion right off the bat regarding who you are and what you’re capable of.

  • Do: Illustrate your strengths.
  • Don’t: Include any fluff.

Jon-ContinoOkPants

Keep it simple! A clean, crisp display is compelling. Don’t lose us in clutter. Remember, less is more! As you begin to develop a look and feel to your portfolio site, come to recognize you are – in a sense – building a brand.  Maintain this consistency throughout your other platforms to fully develop your identity.

  • Do: Use minimal colors and fonts
  • Don’t: Allow your site design to distract from your work

straw-castle

derrick

Tell a story. Did you capture some intriguing moments when working on a design project? Use case studies to illustrate your process. This gives us an in-depth look inside your thoughts, inspirations, motivations and achievements.

  • Do: Start from the beginning! Take us on the entire journey with you and make it an exciting one.
  • Don’t: Hesitate to give insights into challenges along the way.
  • Do: Give us a healthy dose of successes and a insider’s guide to the decisions you made along the way.
  • Do: Tell us how you solved the problem for your client and wrap the story up in a pretty bow!

step-2

Display your personality. Show us what makes you, you – the unique, creative individual and bright light that you are. Aside from the visuals, use an about page to answer our burning question: What will you bring to our creative team? Give us a little business in the front / party in the back here, a little about why you love design and your unique point of view, as well as some fun facts to intrigue us, too. 

  • Do: Be witty, if you can.
  • Don’t: Be afraid to be a little quirky.
  • Do: Show your face. We want to see who we’re dealing with!
  • Don’t write a novel.
  • Do: Tell me why I need you in my life. (Subtly.)

ABOUT — PROMISETANGEMAN

Make it easy to contact you! Now that we’re ready to meet you, we need to reach out. Please make it easy for us to do so.  A separate contact page is the easiest way to do this. Please include a downloadable resume and working email address!

  • Do: At the very least, include working email address.
  • Don’t: Forget to check your links! I want to check out your resume and social media links, LinkedIn, Dribbble and Behance, too!
  • Do: consider adding a contact form, as well as some other information as it applies – address and some questions about the project you’re destined to work on together!

Testimonials. If you’ve gotten some great feedback from clients, don’t be shy. Shout it from the rooftops!

testimonials

Keep it up! Now that you’ve created a beautiful portfolio, keep it updated regularly, following the guidelines we’ve set above.

Good luck everyone!

welding helmet graphic design

Incredibly Fun Project Alert: Lincoln Electric Automated Welding Cell

Check out our work with Lincoln Electric

lincoln-electric-image-3

Our good friends at Lincoln Electric gave us a call because they needed a wrap designed to cover their automatic (robotic) welding cell. They would be competing at the upcoming American Welding Society’s convention. They knew we were the go-to firm for cutting edge and eye-grabbing graphics as they had worked very successfully with us on welding helmet graphic designs in the past. We discussed a few different possible directions and settled on the idea of a futuristic looking welding robot. Today we have automated welding arms, but in fifty years, might we have welding robots walking around?

lincoln-electric-image-2

Above you can see all four sides of the welding cell laid out. Below you can see the final approved design of the robotic welder. You will notice that we decided that this robot’s arm would be the welding tip and not a hand. So, how did Lincoln Electric do in the welding cell design competition? They won it of course, thanks to the creative designers at Go Media!

lincoln-electric-image-1

Check out our Lincoln Electric Welding Helmet Designs

welding helmet graphic design

welding helmet graphic design

User Showcase Highlight Round 14

Since the last User Showcase Highlight post the Go Media User Showcase Pool has ballooned from 1142 images to 4,672! Our members are up to a healthy 1181 and growing.

After browsing through dozens of pages of great submissions, two stood out among the crowd.

All Good Things

by: Michel Bütepage (aka kid grandios)
Congratulations Michel Bütepage!

Michel did a great job with this poster; thoughtful hand-made type that fit the subject matter sold me. I wanted to know a little more about the artist, so I tracked Michel down to ask him a few short questions:

GoMediaZine:Tell us a little bit about yourself. Where do you live? Work? School?

Michel: I’m a 19 years old graphic designer from Bremen, Germany. After 13 years of education I finished school, and accomplished the diploma from German secondary school, qualifying me for university admission or matriculation. By now I’m working as a freelance designer under the Design Core label.

GoMediaZine: How did you become interested in design?

Michel: I started working on graphic designs since 2007 after doing some minor projects like invitations or party flyers.
However I always loved art and design especially artworks, covers and poster-prints. Soon I got more involved in design by creating some personal art prints and wallpapers.

Before I started working with Photoshop I got a collection of 5 to 10 small programs to do different styles of art. Doing some tutorials I learned to handle the different possibilities of Photoshop CS3. After a long time of practice I decided to publish my work on different design networks like flickr.

GoMediaZine: Are you actively freelancing now? What are some of your latest projects?

My latest projects are a Design Core wall print with a new logo presentation and some personal poster designs. Most of my work is already printed and available as a full-size poster.
By now I’m creating personal work to upgrade my portfolio.

Cartaz Drops

by: Guilherme Dossin
Cartaz Drops

Guilherme did a great job using a limited color pallet and communicating some strong emotions in this piece. My only suggestion would be to decrease the size of the logo tag at the bottom & make it a flat instead of embossed.

I tried to contact Guilherme for an interview like Michel’s, but I was unsuccessful. Guilherme, if you see this drop me a line!

Congratulations to Michel and Guilherme, great job! Also, everyone that’s submitting to the User Showcase is producing good work; it’s been difficult to pick out pieces to showcase here on the GoMediaZine. Keep up the good work!

Print Indie: Logo Lounge 5

From the Portfolio: Jedidiah Clothing

Client: Jedidiah Clothing
Designer: Jeff Finley
Designer: 2007
jedidiah clothing

This shirt design was one of the designs I completed for Jedidiah Clothing back in 2007. It was accepted, but I still have never seen it printed or for sale. As a designer, even though you were paid to do a design, the client may not have found it suitable to put to market. Which may have been what happened in this case.

Regardless I think this design was a step forward from the mostly vector based t-shirts I had done prior to this. Yes, I know, this piece is “old” in terms of this blog entry, but it’s probably new to a lot of our readers. The shirt design would have been printed as a dye-sublimated tee. Full color designs on white shirts are perfect for this application.

From the Portfolio: Swap Beats Logo

From the Portfolio: Candy Lettering

From the Portfolio: Chk! Chk! Chk! Poster