Photoshop – Go Media™ · Creativity at work! http://gomedia.com Cleveland Graphic Design, Website Design & Development, Thought Leadership & Inspiration Thu, 25 May 2017 13:43:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 How to Create a Rainbow Effect in Photoshop (Freebie Included) http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/how-to-create-a-rainbow-effect-in-photoshop/ Thu, 05 Jan 2017 14:00:21 +0000 http://gomedia.com/?p=63943 How to Create a Rainbow Effect in Photoshop Hello Everybody! It’s 2017 and this year, I don’t know about you, but I’m resolving to settle into my skin more than ever. This means saying “yes” to life more often, saying… Continue Reading »

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How to Create a Rainbow Effect in Photoshop

Hello Everybody!

It’s 2017 and this year, I don’t know about you, but I’m resolving to settle into my skin more than ever. This means saying “yes” to life more often, saying “no” when I’m really not feeling it and letting my true self come forward, even when I feel like I don’t fit in. I’m going to be myself fully. Unless I have the opportunity to be a unicorn. Then, I’m going to do that.

I’m really excited to announce that we’ve just released a very special texture pack called Glow. It gives you the opportunity to add very special rainbow effects to photos and designs, primarily colorful light leak and vintage effects that will breathe new life into or enhance what is already pretty darn cool. We’re providing you with 45 effects that we handcrafted here in house. We know you’ll love them.

Buy GLOW

Curious to know how we created these ombre effects?

Well today is your lucky today, because we are going to create a special one just for this mini-tutorial. You can download it here >> Magical Rainbow Overlay

Now, onto how we made it.

STEP ONE:  Start a new document with a transparent background, sized 4235 x 2927. Select your color picker and choose your first color. Since we’re making a rainbow effect for this tutorial, we’re going to select a red tone #b62528. Using a large brush, simply paint your canvas to your liking. Try something a little different than ours! Don’t worry too much about perfection here.

Untitled-3

STEP TWO:  Next, head to FILTER > BLUR > GAUSSIAN BLUR. Choose a radius of 250 pixels. Press OK.

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STEP THREE: Shift + Ctrl + N to create a new layer. Drag this layer beneath your first layer. Use your color picker and select for our next layer (orange). Paint with the orange, then repeat the blurring process found in step two. You’ll want to make sure that you paint some orange beneath the red so that they overlap a bit.

Untitled-4

STEP FOUR: Repeat this entire process with yellow (#FFFF00), green (#008000), blue (#0000FF), indigo (#4b0082) and whichever colors that tickle your fancy, remembering to use a new layer for each color. (New layers should be added beneath older layers.)

Untitled-5

STEP FOUR: Select all of our layers, then right click on your mouse > Select > Merge Layers. If you plan on using this as a background in addition to an overlay, I would suggest adding a solid color background to your image as I’ve done below. (Layer > New Fill Layer > Solid Color)

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To finish up, merge those layers together and name your file.

STEP FIVE: Next, File > Place your image into your document. Drag your image beneath your overlay.

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STEP SIX: Now comes the fun part! Choose Layer > Layer Style > Blending Options (or the drop-down shortcut in your layers panel) and play with the options to get the effect you’re after. To get this effect, I chose  the Color Burn blending mode. You can also stack the textures atop one another to really get a unique look. Have fun with it!

unicorn-2

Buy GLOW

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Design Tip of the Day: Creating your own Coloring Book in Photoshop http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/creating-your-own-coloring-book-using-photoshop/ http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/creating-your-own-coloring-book-using-photoshop/#comments Tue, 27 Dec 2016 15:14:03 +0000 http://gomedia.com/?p=63683 Creating your own coloring book using Photoshop > It’s time for the holidays! That means lots of relaxation time, including time spent curled up by the fire. If you’re like me, it’s hard to keep still when all you want… Continue Reading »

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Creating your own coloring book using Photoshop >

It’s time for the holidays! That means lots of relaxation time, including time spent curled up by the fire. If you’re like me, it’s hard to keep still when all you want to do is create all the time. This is where coloring books come in. They’re perfect for cold winter nights when you need to keep yourself busy without going into full work mode. 

Let’s create our own!

Here’s what you need:

Super Simple Method One

STEP ONE:

Open a new document in Photoshop. I sized mine 8 inches by 10 inches.

STEP TWO:

Build your coloring page using any of our vector packs. I made mine from our Cute Monster vector pack. Make sure that your fill color is white and stroke color is black. I sized my stroke at 1 pt. Feel free to download and use my coloring page when you need to escape family time here > Go-Media-Cute-Stuff-Coloring-Page

Go-Media-Cute-Stuff-Coloring-Page

Super Simple Method Two

STEP ONE:

Open a new document in Photoshop. I sized mine 8 x 10 inches. Then, File > Place your image or photo into the new document.

Untitled-9

STEP TWO:

Go to Image > Adjustments > Desaturate.

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STEP THREE:

Next, Filter > Sketch > Photocopy. Here, I have set my detail to 3 and darkness to 20. Set to your desire.

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STEP FOUR:

Next, in order to remove my background, I will head to Select > Color Range. I will touch my eyedropper to the gray line art, which you will then see selected on screen.

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STEP FIVE:

Next, Select > Inverse (Shift + Ctrl + I) to remove the red background.

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STEP SIX: Ctrl + D to deselect.

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STEP SEVEN: In order to darken the lines, head to Image > Adjustments > Levels and darken your black levels.

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STEP EIGHT: Add a white solid color background and you’re done!

8 Creating your own coloring book using Photoshop Creating your own coloring book using Photoshop

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Using Crumpled Paper Textures to Pimp out your Hang in There Cat Poster (Freebie Included!) http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/crumpled-paper-texture-freebie/ Wed, 14 Dec 2016 16:05:49 +0000 http://gomedia.com/?p=63625 PS Basics Tut + Crumpled Paper Texture Freebie  > What’s better than the old “Hang in there” cat poster? Not much in my book. But today, we’re going to add a little more character to one, just for kicks, using… Continue Reading »

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PS Basics Tut + Crumpled Paper Texture Freebie  >

What’s better than the old “Hang in there” cat poster? Not much in my book. But today, we’re going to add a little more character to one, just for kicks, using our new Crumpled Paper Texture Pack. Let’s see if we can make something purr-dy fantastic even better!

What you need:

STEP ONE:

Open your cat poster in Photoshop and file > place your texture over the entire image so that it looks like this.

Crumpled Paper Texture Freebie

STEP TWO: Set your texture layer’s blending mode to “Soft Light.”

step-one

STEP THREE: In order to remove the subtle texture over our cat, let’s get to work applying a layer mask by selecting layer > layer mask > reveal all. This will create a small white rectangular box beside your texture. Click on this newly created mask. Next, select a brush and make sure that your foreground color is black. This will ensure that you’ll be erasing the existing texture from the areas you choose.

When you’re all set-up, use your brush to erase your texture from the cat, rope and text. You should see your work reflected in your layer mask.

step-three

The difference is extremely minimal, but…

hq720STEP FOUR: Duplicate your texture layer and set your new texture layer’s blending mode to “Linear Burn.” (Opacity of around 15%)

stepfour

Feel free to continue to add more paper (or other) textures, continuing to follow what we learned in step three, until you’re satisfied with your end product. I added another texture from our Crumpled Paper Texture Pack to finish my poster up. What does your end product look like? Tweet it to us @go_media!

CAT-POSTER-final

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PS Tutorial: Create a text portrait poster based on your favorite book (Free mockup included) http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/ps-tutorial-create-a-text-portrait-poster-based-on-your-favorite-book-free-mockup-included/ http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/ps-tutorial-create-a-text-portrait-poster-based-on-your-favorite-book-free-mockup-included/#comments Tue, 29 Nov 2016 14:15:14 +0000 http://gomedia.com/?p=63327 Let’s Create a Text Portrait Poster! In today’s tutorial, we are going to be creating a text photo poster created by combining the image of our choice with related text. I’ll create mine based on my favorite book of all time, The… Continue Reading »

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Let’s Create a Text Portrait Poster!

In today’s tutorial, we are going to be creating a text photo poster created by combining the image of our choice with related text. I’ll create mine based on my favorite book of all time, The Catcher in the Rye. Which book will you choose?

You will need:

STEP ONE: Open your image in Photoshop. Duplicate your photo layer so that you have two identical layers.

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STEP TWO: Using the top layer, make a selection in order to cut the photo out from its background. I used the pen tool, but you can choose the implement of your choice. Once you have finished cutting your subject from the background like you see below, choose your PATH tab, right click on “Work Path,” then choose “Make a Selection.” You’ll see your subject selected.

step-one

Next, you’ll want to apply a layer mask to your photo.

That's me!

That’s me!

If you don’t know how to do that, find this little icon below the two layers you have created. Make sure your top layer is selected, then click on it. You know you’ve done it when you see a black and while silhouette of your image to the right of it. This is your layer mask.

Now, select your layer mask, then click CTRL + I. You’ll see your background disappear. Well done! Let’s label this layer Image 2.

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STEP THREE: I decided to enlarge my photo, so that I’d have more surface area for my text to cover later on. If you’d like to do this, make sure both layers are selected, CTRL + T and increase the size to your liking.

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STEP FOUR: It’s time to add our text! Add a new layer above your existing two layers. Next, add a rectangular selection like you see below. This is where your text will end up, so feel free to choose how large or small an area you’d like the text to end up in.

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Go ahead and layout your text in white, so that you can clearly see it in all its glory. When you’re finished, you can change it over to black.

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STEP FIVE: Next, select your text and place a guideline to distinguish the text area versus the plain image space.

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Oh, while you’re at it, slide your text layer beneath your image 2 layer. Now, select your image layer. Use the rectangular marquee tool to select the plain image space, ie. that which isn’t covered in text.7

STEP SIX: Copy, paste this space into its own layer. (CTRL + C, CTRL + V) You’ll see it show up as below.

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STEP SEVEN: Staying on this same layer, let’s use the rectangular marquee to select the opposite side. Choose your paint bucket tool and making sure your foreground color is #000000, fill this side with black.

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STEP EIGHT: Let’s highlight our Image 2 and text layers. Press SHIFT and ALT at the same time, until you get an arrow and symbol indicating it’s time to clip the layers together. Right click to accept.

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STEP NINE: Play around with your final product so that it’s to your liking!

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I headed down to my layer 1 and took the opacity down to 77%, but you do you.

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STEP TEN: Save it out and File > Place it into the free mockup we’ve provided you with today. Then, tweet it out or Instagram. We wanna see! 

final-with-poster

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Getting our 1980s and VHS tape on with Dustin Schmieding’s cosmic fractal storm texture pack! http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/photoshop-abstract-texture-tutorial/ http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/photoshop-abstract-texture-tutorial/#comments Thu, 10 Mar 2016 14:00:57 +0000 http://gomedia.com/?p=59276 Introducing the cosmic fractal storm texture pack Hello everyone! It’s Simon again on this end of the keyboard. I’m returning for another tutorial, and boy, do we have a treat this week. Dustin Schmieding gifted us with yet another fantastic… Continue Reading »

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Introducing the cosmic fractal storm texture pack

Hello everyone! It’s Simon again on this end of the keyboard. I’m returning for another tutorial, and boy, do we have a treat this week. Dustin Schmieding gifted us with yet another fantastic texture pack, the cosmic fractal storm texture collection.

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The set is composed of three-dimensional scenes, resembling cloud formations, or landscapes. Each texture is 4,000×2,700 pixels @ 150 ppi. This gives us plenty of pixels to work with, even for big size print applications (posters, flyers, and more).

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

DOWNLOAD THE COSMIC FRACTAL STORM TEXTURE COLLECTION

Arsenal Members, you get this pack at no extra charge! (Feels like your birthday, doesn’t it?)

Using the pack: let’s play!

These assets are at home in a variety of contexts. They can be used as stand-alone assets, as background elements, as textures… We will explore some of these uses while we embark on the creation of a poster for a (fake) EDM event called Magnetic Fields.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The tutorial will have us explore tips and tricks to recreate a “VHS-like” effect, for all that analog glitch goodness.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

We’ll use primarily Photoshop for this tutorial, as manipulating textures is easier with it, and because we won’t engage in complex type manipulation.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

We are going to work extensively with textures. It’s a good time to remind you guys of a few base rules, and processes:

  1. Don’t know what a clipped layer is? Glad you asked! This means that the layer is only visible/applies to the layer directly below it. You can very quickly do this by holding ALT down on your keyboard and clicking between the two layers. Here’s a quick demonstration.
  2. Every time we’ll work with textures, we’ll follow this simple process: place as smart object, sharpen1, desaturate, enhance contrast with levels, and modify the blending mode.
  3. Placing the textures as smart objects, and using adjustment layers to tweak them, allows us to stick to a non-destructive workflow. We’ve explored in depth the numerous pros and few cons of such a workflow in this past tutorial: “How to Use Textures The Right Way.”

Notes: 1 – accessed through the Filter > Sharpen > Sharpen menu.

With this in place, it’s time to get started!

The concept

As hinted at during our walk-through of the product, these textures feature digital “landscapes” that make no mysteries about how they have been generated. In order to stick to the theme, we are going to give this poster a “Lo-Fi,” CRT-like screen effect. Think of VHS artifacts: scan lines, slight warps, etc.

The concert is being branded as Magnetic Fields, and will take place at the Tate Modern gallery in London, and more specifically in the Turbine Hall. It’s a beautiful industrial space, and hosted a Kraftwerk performance in the past. It’s perfectly fitting.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

(Images via Tate.org/Marcus Leith/Tate Photography – © all rights reserved)

We’ll split our document in two columns to fit all the text (one side main event announcements, one side for the band names). The copy will read “Magnetic Field – 02.06.16 – Tate Modern – Turbine Hall – London, UK,” “Performances by chp_tnes – nu_drds – cbalt – qwerty – & lw_ram,” and “Tickets & information at www.magneticfields.com.”

The two typefaces we’ll use for the poster are League Gothic, and Droid Serif. They are both free for commercial use, so grabbing them is a no-brainer. They even feature an extended set of weights, for even more flexibility.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

All of our band names are inspired by electronics/robotics/computer science jargon:

  • chp_tnes (chiptunes)
  • nu_drds (new droids)
  • cbalt (cobalt)
  • qwerty (look at your keyboard)
  • lw_ram (low RAM)

The event is to take place on February 06th, 2016.

Photoshop Abstract Texture Tutorial

Document setup

Even though our event will take place in the United Kingdom, we will use an 18″x24″ canvas. Designers in the UK would typically use ISO paper sizes, like pretty much the rest of the world. Let’s just say that the performing acts all come from the USA, and that the poster is put together by an American concert promoter.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

As mentioned before, we’ll split our canvas in columns, three to be exact. We’ll also mark a one inch security margin around the edges of our poster. Photoshop CC’s New Guide Layout feature is priceless to generate these rapidly (View > New guide layout).

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Note: if you don’t have the CC version of Photoshop, you can leverage the power of GuideGuide to accomplish the grid-related tasks quickly. The current version isn’t free, but older versions are.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

With the preparation work done, we can finally start to tackle the real thing.

The background

The background will be the base for our VHS effect. The first asset we need is GoMediaArsenal-CosmicFractalStorm-03.jpg, from Dustin’s texture pack.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

It needs to be placed as a smart object at X: 0.5″, and Y:12″, scaled up to 135%, and sharpened (Filters > Sharpen > Sharpen).

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Once in place, it looks like this.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Starting the magic

The VHS-like effect that we will create in a few steps rests on the power of levels, and of blending modes. First, we need three copies of our texture smart object.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Using clipped levels adjustment layers, we are going to “kill” the output of selective color ranges for each of the copies. Let’s start with GoMediaArsenal-CosmicFractalStorm-03 copy. Using the clipped levels adjustment layer, we are going to change the output of blue hues to zero. This will result in a layer turning to yellow hues. Pro tip: note that the additional copies have been hidden for clarity each time.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Using the same technique, the second copy GoMediaArsenal-CosmicFractalStorm-03 copy 2 will see its greens disappear, leaving us with a set of saturated purples.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Finally, we’ll get rid of the reds on GoMediaArsenal-CosmicFractalStorm-03 copy 3.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

With that done, here’s our layer stack so far.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Next, we are going to create a few layer groups: one is for the copies and their adjustment layers, the other one for the background elements in general.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Now, we are going to change the blending mode of each copies to exclusion @ 100% opacity (the copies only – not their adjustment layers!).

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The result is slightly underwhelming at the moment, but we are going to address that shortly.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Out-of-synchronization frames, part one

Next, we need to carefully offset each of the copies from the original smart object. For instance, instead of GoMediaArsenal-CosmicFractalStorm-03 copy being positioned at X: 0.5″, and Y:12″, it should be positioned at X: 0.55″, and Y:12.1″.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

GoMediaArsenal-CosmicFractalStorm-03 copy 2 can go from its original spot to X: 0.495″, and Y:11.95″.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Finally, GoMediaArsenal-CosmicFractalStorm-03 copy 3 can migrate to X: 0.485″, and Y:11.97″.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The effect is taking shape: we just established the basis for out-of-synchronization frames, or tape damage. To make things more legible, we are going to lower the opacity of the copies to 50%.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Out-of-synchronization frames, part two

To make the effect more believable, we are going to alter a portion of it. Let’s start by creating a merged copy of everything so far (CTRL/CMD+ALT/OPTION+SHIFT+E), at the top of our layer stack. The generated layer should be called Shear.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

We are now going to apply a shear filter to it (Filter > Distort > Shear). The effect is controlled through the small curve in the effect window. Clicking on the grid adds controls points (but no handles). Holding ALT/OPTIONS allows you to reset the manipulation. Wrap around loops disappearing image parts on the opposite side of the canvas. Repeat edge pixels stretches the pixels at the limit of the canvas to the image’s edges.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

After creating a curve directed to the bottom right corner of the canvas, our result is pretty dramatic.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Using our guides, we are going to create selections that we’ll use to mask parts of the sheared layer.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

With the selections active, we can head to Layer > Layer Mask > Reveal selection.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

With that done, we can change the blending mode of the Shear layer to color dodge @ 35% opacity.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Additional touches

To complement the effect, we are going to add some thin horizontal lines at the edges of our selections. These lines will each be 1 point thick, run the full width of the poster, be colored in 50% gray (#808080), and perfectly aligned with the edges of the visible parts of the Shear layer. These lines should be created with either the pen tool (P), or with the line tool (U).

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The settings options offered by Photoshop CC 2016 allows to customize the stroke. It should be noted that aligning the stroke to the outside produces the best result.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Once one of the lines is created, it can be duplicated and positioned to the appropriate locations.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Once in place, the lines’ blending mode can be changed to screen @ 25% opacity.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

And after some layer organization, our background layers start resembling something.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Icing on the cake

Because our background needs to not compete with our type elements later, we are going to darken it. We’ll use a levels adjustment layer for that.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

After one last look at the layer stack, we’re ready to move onto type!

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Type

The foundations

Now that our background is in place, we can start shaping our text blocks. The first one is the main one: “MAGNETIC FIELDS / 02.06.16 / TATE MODERN / TURBINE HALL / LONDON, UK.”

The type is set in League Gothic Condensed, that is 300 points tall, with a line spacing of 272 points, colored in white, and with kerning set to optical. These settings make the copy fit the two left columns of the grid, leaving the right column for the additional information blocks.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The next block is “Performances by // chp_tnes / nu_drds / cbalt / qwerty / & lw_ram.” The type is set in Droid Serif Bold, that is 54 points tall, aligned to the right, colored in white, and with kerning set to metric. These settings make the text block fit snugly in the top right corner of the poster.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The third and last text block is for the miscellaneous information: “Tickets & information at www.magneticfields.com.” It is set in Droid Serif Bold, that is 30 points tall, aligned to the right, colored in white, and with kerning set to metric. These settings make the text block fit snugly in the bottom right corner of the poster.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The result is interesting, but it lacks depth.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

In order to address that, we are going to replicate the VHS effect we gave the background to the main type block. Let’s start by creating three copies of the type element.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Instead of using levels adjustment layers, we are going to assign hues directly to each type elements. This works because the type is a solid color object, as opposed to the visually complex texture we applied the effect to earlier.

The bottom copy, MAGNETIC FIELDS 02.06.16 TATE MODERN TURBINE HALL LONDON, UK copy 3, should be assigned the base blue color #0000ff.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The middle copy, MAGNETIC FIELDS 02.06.16 TATE MODERN TURBINE HALL LONDON, UK copy 2, should be assigned the base red color #ff0000.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The top copy, MAGNETIC FIELDS 02.06.16 TATE MODERN TURBINE HALL LONDON, UK copy, should be assigned the base green color #00ff00.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The top text element (the original one) should stay white.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

From there, we can change the blending mode of the three copies to exclusion @ 100% opacity, and of the original element to overlay @ 100% opacity.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Now, in order to complete the effect, we simply have to offset the three copies in separate directions, using the arrow keys on our keyboard.Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

And with that done, we can move on to the last step: textures. Below is a look at our layer stack so far.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Textures!

Things to grab

Before we get moving, here are three assets to grab. They are all free. The first one is photocopy by clarisaponcedeleon, via DeviantArt.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The second is Film texture – grain explosion by JakezDaniel, on DeviantArt.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The third texture is vintage-paper-textures-volume-01-sbh-005, from the Vintage Paper Textures, Volume 1 set. It was made available through the “cute robot” book cover tutorial freebies.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

DOWNLOAD THE CUTE ROBOT TUTORIAL FREEBIE ARCHIVE

The last asset is this pattern tile, that we’ll use for scan lines. You should download it by right-clicking on it, and using the Save image at menu.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Putting things in place

The first texture we’ll use is the film noise texture, film_texture___grain_explosion_by_jakezdaniel-d37pwfa.jpg.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

It needs to be placed centered in the canvas, rotated of 90° clockwise, and scaled down to 80% so it covers the whole piece.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

From there, we can change its blending mode to color dodge @ 15% opacity.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The next texture is the scanline pattern. Let’s open the file.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

With the file open, we need to head to Edit > Define pattern. This will ask us to name it, and to validate. Once that is done, our pattern will be ready to use in our piece. Let’s close the pattern, and head back to our main file.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Back in the main file, let’s create a new, empty layer at the top of our layer stack.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

We are going to apply the pattern using a layer style. First, we need to fill our layer with a solid color. Which one won’t matter, it is just to make sure the effect shows up. 50% gray is a good default choice in these cases (#808080).

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Next, we can open up our layer style palette by double-clicking on the layer thumbnail in the layer panel.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Let’s navigate to the pattern overlay section. It’s a simple interface. We can control the pattern tile roughly the same way we can control a layer: blending mode, opacity, scale, etc.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Let’s use the drop-down menu to select our scanline pattern.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Finally, we can dramatically scale the pattern up to make sure the lines are visible (900%).

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Our pattern is applied, but we need to give it an additional touch for more veracity. Let’s convert the layer to a smart object (Filters > Convert to smart filters).

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Next, let’s assign a 2 pixels gaussian blur to the pattern layer/smart object (Filter > Blur > Gaussian blur).

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Finally, let’s change the blending mode to overlay @ 10% opacity.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

With the scanlines in place, we can move to a slight color alteration. We are going to use a gradient overlay for it. Just like before, we’ll need a layer filled with 50% gray (#808080).

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Next, we are going to change the layer’s fill to 0%. This allows to hide the layer’s pixels (the gray), but to let any effects applied through the layer style panel to shine through.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Let’s open the gradient overlay side of the panel.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

In the gradient drop down menu, let’s select the spectrum gradient.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Let’s change the blending mode of the gradient to overlay @ 15% opacity, and change the angle to -50°.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

This gives us a nice added depth to the colors of the piece.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The next to last texture is vintage-paper-textures-volume-01-sbh-005.jpg, from the cute robot tutorial freebie archive.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

It needs to be placed centered in the canvas, rotated of 90°, and scaled up to 440%.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Blending mode: soft light @ 25% opacity.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

The last texture is photocopy_by_clarisaponcedeleon.jpg.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

This one needs to be centered in the canvas, and slightly distorted (width: 212%, and height: 208%).

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Levels adjustments.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Blending mode: soft light @ 75% opacity.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

And with that, our piece is complete! After a last go at organizing our layers, here’s the full layer stack.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Wrapping things up!

Phew, that was a long one! I hope that you enjoyed following along with the tutorial as much as I enjoyed creating it, and that your outcome matches the goals you set for yourself before diving in.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

Did I leave anything unclear? Any suggestions? Don’t hesitate to reach out in the comments below! I’ll be happy to help out.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

We’d love to see your tutorial outcomes! Please share them with us on the Go Media Facebook page, or on Twitter at @go_media.

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

And finally, I hope that this gave you a preview of the cool things you can achieve with the cosmic fractal storm texture pack, by Dustin Schmieding. The pack is available for download now!

Cosmic Fractal Storm Textures Exploration Tutorial

On that note, that’s all for me today. Until next time, cheers!

The post Getting our 1980s and VHS tape on with Dustin Schmieding’s cosmic fractal storm texture pack! appeared first on Go Media™ · Creativity at work!.

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Video Tutorial: How to Create Your Own PS Brushes http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/how-to-make-photoshop-brushes/ Tue, 23 Feb 2016 19:12:40 +0000 http://gomedia.com/?p=59669 How to Make Photoshop Brushes In this video tutorial, we teach you how to make your very own Photoshop Brushes. We create ours using coffee stains, but you can use paint, watercolors, or other fun materials you find around your studio.… Continue Reading »

The post Video Tutorial: How to Create Your Own PS Brushes appeared first on Go Media™ · Creativity at work!.

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How to Make Photoshop Brushes

In this video tutorial, we teach you how to make your very own Photoshop Brushes. We create ours using coffee stains, but you can use paint, watercolors, or other fun materials you find around your studio.

Get the Brushes

Ready, set…

Now that you’ve watched this video, you’re all set to make your own. But first, pick up our Coffee Stain Brush Pack. This kit comes with the Coffee Stain Brushes we created in-house, as well as 10 bonus vector elements. You’ll also get a PDF guide. The guide gives you instruction on how to install your new brushes, as well as gives you a preview of each brush.

How to Make Photoshop Brushes How to Make Photoshop Brushes How to Make Photoshop Brushes

Get the Brushes

The post Video Tutorial: How to Create Your Own PS Brushes appeared first on Go Media™ · Creativity at work!.

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Tutorial: Rockin’ Some Radical Glitch Effects in PS (plus 4 Free TV Glitch Textures just for YOU) http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/tutorial-rockin-some-radical-glitch-effects-in-ps-plus-4-free-tv-glitch-textures-just-for-you/ Fri, 19 Feb 2016 14:00:30 +0000 http://gomedia.com/?p=59512 TV Glitch Effects: Makin’ Em in PS (& Free TV Glitch Textures, Too!) So guys, we’re kind of obsessed with these tv glitch textures we’ve been seeing around town lately. So, we created some for you to use and apply to your… Continue Reading »

The post Tutorial: Rockin’ Some Radical Glitch Effects in PS (plus 4 Free TV Glitch Textures just for YOU) appeared first on Go Media™ · Creativity at work!.

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TV Glitch Effects: Makin’ Em in PS (& Free TV Glitch Textures, Too!)

So guys, we’re kind of obsessed with these tv glitch textures we’ve been seeing around town lately. So, we created some for you to use and apply to your work right now.

Download: 4 Free TV Glitch Textures by Go Media’s Arsenal 

We also thought you might like to learn how to apply your own glitch effect on photos in Photoshop. So stick around and we’ll create some magic together.

Ready, set…

Step 1

Choose your photo and open it up in PS.

Something about this photo really called to me. Can’t put my finger on it.

5282951160_8a261e63a4_o

Step 2

Press play.

Step 3

Open up your channels panel, then highlight your red panel.

2

Step 4

From your menu options, select Filter > Distort > Shear

3

Step 5

Using the points given, create a soft wave.

In the “Undefined Areas,” section, select “Repeat Edge Pixels,” then select “Ok” to Save.

4

Step 6

Look back at your channels panel. Make sure all of your colors are selected now. What do you think? Love what you see? Want more cowbell?

5

If you’re craving more glitch, select your green panel and repeat the process we completed in Step 5.

6

Step 7

And, you guessed it! Feel free to repeat with the blue color channel as well.

Play with it until you’re satisfied.

7

Step 8

Last, let’s go Filter > Noise > Add Noise. Crank that up as high as you’d like (Gaussian) and Ok to Save.

8

Step 8

Boom! You’re done! Mock that beautiful art up on a MockupEverything.com or Arsenal template and call it a day. I salute you!

final-final

Hope you guys had fun. What freebie textures, what tutorials do you want us to create next? Please let us know in the comments section below!

The post Tutorial: Rockin’ Some Radical Glitch Effects in PS (plus 4 Free TV Glitch Textures just for YOU) appeared first on Go Media™ · Creativity at work!.

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How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will’s hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/sci-fi-vectors/ http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/sci-fi-vectors/#comments Mon, 11 Jan 2016 15:00:03 +0000 http://gomedia.com/?p=58923 Hello, dear Zine reader! It's Simon on this end of the keyboard for a new tutorial. This time, we'll have a close look at how to use Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vector pack. Continue Reading »

The post How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will’s hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! appeared first on Go Media™ · Creativity at work!.

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Introducing Justin Will’s Sci-Fi vector pack!

Hello, dear Zine reader! It’s Simon on this end of the keyboard for a new tutorial. This time, we’ll have a close look at how to use Justin Will’s hand drawn Sci-Fi vector pack.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The pack features a lot of the typical elements of a good Sci-Fi story: robots, crazy laboratory contraptions, a ray gun, a spaceman, and more! Each of the vectors has been given extra care in its execution to be unique, yet quickly recognizable.The assets all feature this clean, detailed, yet almost child-like treatment to them.

Untitled-1

DOWNLOAD JUSTIN’S SCI-FI VECTOR PACK NOW!

Arsenal Members, you get this pack at no extra charge! (Feels like your birthday, doesn’t it?)

Technical notes

We’ll be using mostly Photoshop CC for the tutorial, but any version of Photoshop past CS3 should be fine. Note also that I’m working on a Windows-based system, but other than visual appearance and slightly different keyboard shortcuts, that will not have any impact on the process we’ll go through. We’ll use Illustrator only to open the vector asset, and to paste it in our Photoshop document.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

We are going to work extensively with textures. It’s a good time to remind you guys of a few base rules, and processes:

  1. Don’t know what a clipped layer is? Glad you asked! This means that the layer is only visible/applies to the layer directly below it. You can very quickly do this by holding ALT down on your keyboard and clicking between the two layers. Here’s a quick demonstration.
  2. Every time we’ll work with textures, we’ll follow this simple process: place as smart object, sharpen1, desaturate, enhance contrast with levels, and modify the blending mode.
  3. Placing the textures as smart objects, and using adjustment layers to tweak them, allows us to stick to a non-destructive workflow. We’ve explored in depth the numerous pros and few cons of such a workflow in this past tutorial: “How to Use Textures The Right Way.”

Notes: 1 – accessed through the Filter > Sharpen > Sharpen menu

So, what are we going to build?

Given the comic book/children’s book illustration style of the assets, we wanted the final output to fit these realms. After some experimentation, and a dozen thumbnail sketches, here are the two main ideas that came to life: a NASA recruitment poster, and a book cover for a (fake) children’s book called “The gentle robot.” I worked with color pencils to establish a color palette right away.

The slightly colder blue and green hues of the robot’s body contrast nicely with the warmer orange background.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

In this concept, the orange space suit of the astronaut contrasts with the colder dark blue and magenta of the deep space behind him.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

After discussion, we decided to focus on the children’s book cover: it felt truer to the asset, and to the desired target audience.

We’ll need to grab a few things before we start

Good news! Aside from the vector asset, all the things you’ll need for the tutorial are free resources. We also decided to make two textures from the Arsenal available as freebies, so you wouldn’t be hindered in the completion of the piece. The assets you’ll need to get are textures, available from the Lost and Taken archives, as well as from the Lost and Taken Flickr stream.

The first texture is Grey_Grunge4.jpg, from Lost and Taken’s five grey texture pack. Pro tip: grab the whole set, all of these are great.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The next texture is LT_Microscopic35mmFilm_02.JPG, from the seven microscopic film textures pack.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Next, is Vintage_Paper_7.jpg, from the early 20th century paper textures set.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The following asset is DigitalNoise_05.jpg, from the digital noise textures pack.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Next, brown16, from Lost and Taken’s Flickr stream. Pro tip: remember to always download the highest possible size, or better yet, the original size, when grabbing textures from Flickr.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Next, free_high_res_texture_455, also from Lost and Taken’s Flickr stream.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The last two textures that interest us have generously been made available as freebies by Go Media’s Arsenal. Pro tip: become a member today, for access to thousands of design assets, for only $15 a month.

The first texture is vintage-paper-textures-volume-01-sbh-005.jpg, from the Vintage Paper Textures, Volume 1 set.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The second freebie is metal-dumpster-textures-021-sbh.jpg, from the metal dumpster texture pack.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

DOWNLOAD THE FREEBIE ARCHIVE

Document setup

Since we are working on a book cover, we are going to work within a document with different measurements from our typical 18″x24″. One of the most popular book cover sizes is 6″x9″, which is an aspect ratio of 2:3.

Our document will have a one inch bleed/safe zone around it, to account for trimming and other production constraints. This means that instead of being 6″x9″ on the nose, it’ll be 8″x11″.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The next step is to add a few guides. We’ll use them to mark the actual cover’s size, as well as the center of our canvas. I’m using Photoshop CC’s New Guide Layout feature to generate these rapidly.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Note: if you don’t have the CC version of Photoshop, you can leverage the power of GuideGuide to accomplish the grid-related tasks quickly. The current version isn’t free, but older versions are.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Additionally, we can also add guides to mark a half inch zone within the safe zone. These will help us not to stick our content too close to the edges of the cover.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

With that done, we can get started with the real thing.

Building up the background

The first step is to fill the background layer with a pale orange, #fde2c6.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The first texture we’ll use is brown16 (5025205871_cab14db56b_o.jpg).

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

It needs to be placed as a smart object, centered in the canvas, and scaled down to 52%. That way, it will fit well within the final format of the cover (6″x9″).

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

After sharpening the texture (Filter > Sharpen > Sharpen), we need to desaturate the texture using a clipped hue/saturation adjustment layer.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Next, we need to use a clipped levels adjustment layer to adjust the texture’s details.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Finally, we need to change the blending mode of the texture to soft light @ 85% opacity.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The next texture is LT_Microscopic35mmFilm_02.JPG.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

It needs to be centered in the canvas, rotated 90° clockwise, and scaled down to 17%.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

After sharpening, and desaturating, we need to use a clipped curves adjustment layer to invert the texture.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The trick to invert the texture is to use the negative preset in the drop down menu.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Then, a clipped levels adjustment layer to tweak the texture.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Finally, we need to change the blending mode to soft light @ 85% opacity.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Our background is set. Now, we need to organize our layers better.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The robot

As we want to build the book cover for a story about a robot, we need to bring the said robot in our piece. Let’s open the vector set in Illustrator.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Our robot is second from the left in the first row.

the-shop-go-media-sci-fi-vectors-tutorial-001-300x300

It needs to be placed in our document as a smart object, scaled up to 225%, and located precisely at X: 4″, and Y: 7″.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The next step is to give the robot a bright blue color overlay (#78c8d8).

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Now, we need to give some additional colors to the robot. Let’s start by giving it its main color fill. The robot will be a light blue color, #d6f6f1. We need to create a new layer below the robot’s smart object, and to paint the color in carefully, without going over the lines. Given the scale we are working at, a hard, round 100 pixels brush will do just fine. Pro tip: you can use your magic wand (W) to create a selection if you don’t trust the precision of your brush strokes.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The next step is to add a secondary color to the robot. We’ll fill its “hands” and “sleeves” with a pink hue, #dd86a5. Note that we’re filling the area inside the sleeves.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Now, we need to give the robot some depth. We’ll do this by painting a green hue (#bad9ab) in select places, where there would be shadows. The exact positions of the shadows don’t matter, as long as they are consistent.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Also, a small hard brush (between 12 and 18 pixels), and zooming in at 100%, will both be paramount to paint precisely the small details.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The last thing we need to give the robot is a grounding shadow, otherwise it will look like it’s floating in space. We are going to use the ellipse tool (U) for that. The ellipse is 3.75″x0.5″, and located at X: 4″, and Y: 4.35″. Its color is #dd86a5, the same pink hue used for the sleeve and pincers.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

With that done, we can organize our layers some more.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Type

A book cover without a title and author name appearing is not often heard of. Our story is called “The gentle robot,” and was written by Cassia Ovami (internet high five if you find the real author name hidden behind this anagram).

The two typefaces we’ll use for the cover are part of free font families from the Google Fonts project: Open Sans, and Droid Serif. Pro tip: download the whole Open Sans family (Open Sans, Open Sans Condensed), as well as the whole Droid family (Droid Sans, Droid Sans Mono, and Droid Serif).

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Once the fonts have been downloaded, we need to  generate three separate text blocks:

  1. “THE” – set in Droid Serif Bold Italic, that is 24 points tall, with kerning set to metrics, and colored in blue #78c8d8
  2. “GENTLE ROBOT” – set in Open Sans Extrabold, that is 48 points tall, with kerning set to optical, and also colored in blue #78c8d8
  3. “CASSIA OVAMI” – set in Droid Serif Bold Italic, that is 24 points tall, with kerning set to metrics, and colored in #dd86a5
How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Here are the position coordinates for each block:

  • THE – X: 4″, and Y: 1.65″
  • GENTLE ROBOT – X: 4″, and Y: 2.30″
  • CASSIA OVAMI – X: 4″, and Y: 3.125″
How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

There is an obvious gap between the title, and the author name. We’ll use this space to add a blue rectangular divider. We’ll create it using the rectangle tool (U). The shape is colored in our blue (#78c8d8), and measures 5″x0.1″. It’s placed at X: 4“, and Y: 2.7″.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

With that, our text block is complete.  A bit of layer organization, and we can move on to the finishing touches!

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Textures! Textures everywhere!

We’ll approach adding textures to the piece in two phases: first, we need to add some textures to the robot, so it doesn’t clash too much with the background. Then, we’ll add texture that will impact the piece as a whole, visually linking everything together. The process we’ll follow is the same as before (place as smart object, sharpen, desaturate, enhance contrast with levels, and modify the blending mode).

The robot

The first texture we’ll add to the robot is the first of the Arsenal freebie set: vintage-paper-textures-volume-01-sbh-005.jpg.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

It needs to be placed centered in the frame, rotated 90° clockwise, and scaled up 160%. The layer should be located right above the robot smart object in the layer stack, which is why the title block is still visible. Pro tip: the title block layer group can be turned off for a better view of the texture work.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Clipped levels adjustment layer.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Blending mode: soft light @ 100% opacity.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The next texture is the second Arsenal freebie, metal-dumpster-textures-021-sbh.jpg.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

It’s placed at X: 3″, and Y: 7.15″, scaled down to 16%. We also need to rotate it from 180°.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Blending mode: soft light @ 85% opacity.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The last of the three robot texture is Vintage_Paper_7.jpg.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

It’s placed at X: 4″, and Y: 6″, scale untouched.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Blending mode: color burn @ 10% opacity.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Now, we need to limit the impact of these three textures to the robot and its supporting shadow. First, let’s give the textures and their adjustment layers their own layer sub-group.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Next, using the magic wand (W), and with the robot smart object highlighted in the layer palette, we are going to select the empty space around the robot.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Next, we are going to invert the selection (CTRL/CMD+SHIFT+I or Select > Inverse), to select only the robot.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Now, to add the pink supporting shape to our selection, we need to CTRL/CMD+SHIFT+CLICK its thumbnail in the layer palette. CTRL/CMD+CLICK loads a layer’s content as a selection. Using SHIFT as the shortcut modifier tells Photoshop to add that to the currently active selection, rather than create a new one instead.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Finally, we can highlight the robot textures layer sub-group at the bottom of the layer palette, and click on the add layer mask button of the layer palette for a layer mask that limits the textures’ visibility to the robot. Alternatively, we can use the Layer > Layer Mask > Reveal selection menu.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

And with that done, we can move on to the global textures.

Texturing the whole piece

There are three textures in our list that we haven’t used yet, and these are the last three we need to add to the piece.

The first of these textures is free_high_res_texture_455.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

We’ll use it placed centered in the canvas, rotated of 90° clockwise, and scaled down to 52%.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Blending mode: soft light @ 100% opacity.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The next texture is Grey_Grunge4.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

It’s placed centered in the canvas, and scaled down to 27%.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Blending mode: soft light @ 35% opacity.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Finally, the last texture! It’s DigitalNoise_05.jpg.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

It’s centered in the canvas, rotated of 90° clockwise, and scaled down to 18%.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The only adjustment needed here is a clipped curves adjustment layer, set to negative.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Blending mode: soft light @ 65% opacity.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

The piece is now complete. We can organize the layer stack better.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

With that done, it’s time to save a copy of our document, cropped to the final dimensions of the cover (6″x9″).

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

After that, we can mock it up, to get a sense of what it would look like once printed.

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Wrapping things up

Phew, we’re done! I hope that you enjoyed the ride, and that you have learned a few tips here and there to reuse in your own work. If you’ve already grabbed Justin’s Sci-Fi vector pack, I hope that thus tutorial gave you a sense of what you can accomplish with it. If you haven’t, I wonder why you still haven’t!

DOWNLOAD JUSTIN WILL’S SCI-FI VECTOR PACK

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

Do you have questions? Suggestions? Ideas on how to improve the workflow presented here? Please do reach out in the comments below!

How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will's hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors!

You should also share your outcome with us, either in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or by tweeting it to us at @go_media.

And on that note, that’s all for me today. Until next time!

The post How to create a cute robot children book cover with Justin Will’s hand drawn Sci-Fi vectors! appeared first on Go Media™ · Creativity at work!.

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Tutorial: Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne’s Texture Lot One (Free Poster Mockup Included) http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/conference-poster-tutorial/ Tue, 01 Dec 2015 14:00:33 +0000 http://gomedia.com/?p=58429 Hello there! It's Simon on this end of the keyboard. I'm very happy to make my return to the Zine with a poster design tutorial, that will explore the possibilities offered by Jason Carne's Texture Lot One. The tutorial will have us explore texture use tips and tricks, but also customized black and white conversion, large scale sharpening, type pairing, layout building, and more. Continue Reading »

The post Tutorial: Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne’s Texture Lot One (Free Poster Mockup Included) appeared first on Go Media™ · Creativity at work!.

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Conference Poster Tutorial

Hello there! It’s Simon on this end of the keyboard. I’m very happy to make my return to the Zine with a poster design tutorial, that will explore the possibilities offered by Jason Carne’s Texture Lot One. The tutorial will have us explore texture use tips and tricks, but also customized black and white conversion, large scale sharpening, type pairing, layout building, and more.

I’ll be using Photoshop CC for the tutorial, but any version of Photoshop past CS3 should be fine. Note also that I’m working on a Windows-based system, but other than visual appearance and slightly different keyboard shortcuts, that will not have any impact on the process we’ll go through.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Introducing Jason Carne’s Texture Lot One

texure-lot-1-hero

As the hero shot image tells us, the set contains 30 “finely crafted” textures, that will help us to give a wide array of artifacts to our flat, digital art. They come from a multitude of source material: burlap, cork board, a scratched cutting board, stone, and more.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The textures come in the form of high resolution, black and white textures.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The level of detail is superb, and gives us plenty to leverage to add substance to our compositions.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

And one more for the road, just because we can.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Go pick Jason’s Texture Lot One up now at the Arsenal!

The brief

Let’s talk some more about the piece we’re putting together here. It’s a poster for a (fake) architecture lecture, focusing on Cleveland’s brutalist landmarks.

What is brutalism? Glad you asked:

Brutalist architecture is a movement in architecture that flourished from the 1950s to the mid-1970s, descending from the modernist architectural movement of the early 20th century. The term originates from the French word for “raw” in the term used by Le Corbusier to describe his choice of material béton brut (raw concrete). British architectural critic Reyner Banham adapted the term into “brutalism” (originally “New Brutalism”) to identify the emerging style.

Wikipedia

So, what does a brutalist building look like? There’s this amazing Tumblr called F**k yeah brutalism out there, and it’ll help me to answer that question:

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

(Education Wing, Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio, 1971 -Marcel Breuer & Associates – via)

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

(State Historical Center, Columbus, Ohio, 1970 – Ireland and Associates – via)

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

(State Historical Center, Columbus, Ohio, 1970 – Ireland and Associates – via)

There is something monolithic, synthetic, and minimalistic at times.

Now, why choose Cleveland as the focal point of the fake lecture? It happens that Cleveland has its share of brutalist buildings. A 2007 article from the Plain Dealer lists the major local representative landmarks of the movement: Cleveland State University, Cuyahoga Community College Metro Campus, Cleveland Justice Center Complex, Crawford Hall (Case Western Reserve University), and more.

Assembling the free assets needed

It happens that there is a CC-licensed image of the Cleveland Ameritrust Building, one of these major landmarks, available on Flickr for us to use as the base of our poster. We’ll need to grab the biggest size available (4028 x 2704 pixels), through the all sizes page.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Other than the high resolution version of the image, we’ll also need to have two (free) typefaces accessible to us: League Spartan Bold, and League Gothic.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The last asset we’ll need to have at hand is this beautiful, free aged paper texture, courtesy of our very own Dustin Schmieding:

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Got it all? Then it’s time to get started!

Preparing our Photoshop document

We’ll use is a “standard” 18″x24″ canvas for our piece. For the readers outside of the USA, feel free to use an A3 format. Note the fact that we’re using an RGB document, as some of the filters we’ll use require that color space to function.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Next, we need to setup a grid. It’ll help us when building the composition. First, we’ll leverage Adobe CC’s New guide layout functionality to build a six columns by 8 rows main grid (View > New guide layout).

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The result is a grid based on squares of 3″x3″.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Note: if you don’t have the CC version of Photoshop, you can leverage the power of GuideGuide to accomplish the grid-related tasks quickly. The current version isn’t free, but older versions are.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The next set of guides are going to help us establish the boundaries of the center column. We need vertical guides at 4.5″, and at 13.5″.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Finally, we need horizontal guides at 11.5″, and at 12.5″.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

And with that, our document is ready to go. It’s time to get started for real.

The background

Background color

The first thing we need to do is give a solid color to our background layer. It’s going to be the base for the effects we’ll build up through the tutorial. We’ll be using a very light gray, #ededed. If we were using pure white, the contrasts would be too strong, and some of the texture effects we’ll apply later would be “washed out.”

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Photographic manipulations

Next, we need to place the photo in our composition. We’ll place the photo as a smart object, in order to maintain a lossless workflow. It will also guarantee us access to the untouched original file. To do so, we have to use File > Place (or File >Place embedded in Photoshop CC), and navigate to the photo file.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Once the image is included in our file, we will give it its final positioning and size using the absolute positioning tools at our disposal. The center point of the image should be at X: 2.55″, and Y: 26″. The image is scaled up to 125%.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

With that done, we need to sharpen the smart object, since we scaled it up. We’ll use the high pass filter for that. The Zine archive features a short article about the technique already. Let’s start by duplicating the smart object.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Next, we need to run the high pass filter (Filter > Other > High pass). We’ll use a radius of 100 pixels.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The result doesn’t look like much. To obtain the desired effect, we need to change the copy’s blending mode to soft light @ 100% opacity.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Next, we are going to clip the copy to the original layer (CTRL/CMD+ALT/OPTION+G). This contains the high pass effect to the layer it’s clipped on.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

With that done, we can change the blending mode of the original layer to multiply @ 100% opacity. This will make the photo adopt the soft gray we’ve used as background color as its main color once we’ve converted it to black and white.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Black and white adjustments

Desaturating a picture IS NOT a proper way to convert it to black and white. We are going to use a black and white adjustment layer for that. The preset we’ll use is called blue filter. Cyan, blue, and magenta hues in the original image will be light, while greens, yellows, and reds will be untouched or dark. For a higher contrast, the greens, yellows, and reds could be purposefully set to darker (using a negative value in the sliders).

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The next step is a curve adjustment layer, set to the lighter preset. This allows us to soften the black and white conversion.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Finally, a levels adjustment layer allows us to push the contrast up.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

It’s time for some layer organization.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

A hint of texture

We are going to add one of Jason’s textures above the background. It will help us to generate a subtle grain effect. The texture is Corkscrewed – Light.

Go pick Jason’s Texture Lot One up now at the Arsenal!

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

It’s placed centered in our canvas, rotated of 90°, and scaled up to 225%.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

After converting the texture layer to a smart object (Filter > Convert for smart filters), and sharpening the texture (Filter > Sharpen > Sharpen), we can change its blending mode to soft light @ 75% opacity.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

That texture concludes our work on the background. Before switching gears and attacking the content columns, here’s a look at our layers so far.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Content columns

Setting up the columns backgrounds

Back when we set up the grid, we created a set of special guides that we’ll now use to delimit central column for our text. The column is split in two parts, one with a red background, and one with an almost-black background.

Let’s start with the almost black. It sits at the bottom half of the canvas. Here’s the area we have to delimit.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

After creating a new layer, we need to fill it with a very dark gray, #040404.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Finally, the blending mode of that layer should be multiply @ 98% opacity. This will allow us to bring a hint of translucency in the shape.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The next shape will be its pendant at the top of the composition, and will be filled with a very bright red, #eb1d1d.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The blending mode of that layer should be multiply @ 50% opacity.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The shape’s translucency is too high (we need to remember that it will be the background to text later on). In order to address this, we’ll duplicate the layer, and change the blending mode of that copy to normal @ 50% opacity.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Layer organization

A quick note about layers, as we’re about to add type elements in there. Here’s what they should be organized into. The background elements have their layer group, and each half column elements have their dedicated layer group. From there, it’ll be easy to add the type in the proper group, so everything stays organized.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

It’s time to talk about typography

As announced at the beginning, we’ll be using two type families: League Spartan Bold, and League Gothic.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The main title

The main title reads “CLEVELAND / BRUTALIST / LANDMARKS,” and is set in all caps League Spartan Bold, colored in #ededed, that is 48 points tall, and with tracking set to 250. Each line is its own text object, and they are aligned to the grid lines within the column.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

In order to further ground the title element, we are going to add horizontal dividers underneath each line of text. The dividers will be colored in #ededed, and measure 6″x0.125″. The dividers are positioned underneath each text line, 0.125″ under the text line. We’ll use shape layers to generate the dividers.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

And here’s what the layers look like.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Additional information

We are not creating a proper conference poster if we don’t add the secondary information like the lecturer’s name, a date, a location, and a URL. The information is broken down as follows:

“NOVEMBER 20TH 2015 AT 07.30 PM / CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART / A LECTURE BY DR RYAN G. BRAVIN / www.clevelandart.org”

The individual type objects are aligned in a similar fashion as before, on the grid lines. “NOVEMBER 20TH 2015 AT 07.30 PM” is set in League Gothic Condensed Regular, that is 72 points tall, colored in #ededed, and with kerning set to optical.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

“CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART” is set in League Gothic Regular, that is colored in #ededed, that is 60 points tall, and with kerning set to optical.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

“A LECTURE BY DR RYAN G. BRAVIN” is set in #ededed colored League Gothic Condensed Regular, that is 72 points tall, and with kerning set to optical.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Finally, the URL to the site of the Cleveland Museum of Art, www.clevelandart.org, is set in #ededed colored League Spartan Bold, that is 24 points tall. The text object is located at X: 9″, and Y: 22.8″.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Here’s what the layer organization looks like:

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

And with our type in place, our piece is almost complete.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Now, it’s time to layer some more textures to polish the piece!

Textures and artifacts

Here’s a theory: one of the motivations to add textures to our work is to help us to add depth to our digital art, and to break away from their flat, clean, and precise origins. At this point in the process, the photo is pretty gritty, but the type above it is very clean. Adding more textures will allow us to weather that type and the column backgrounds.

The first texture we’ll add is PackingFoam.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

It’s placed centered in the composition, rotated 90° clockwise, and scaled to 55%.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

After sharpening the texture (Filter > Sharpen > Sharpen), we can change the blending mode to screen @ 15% opacity.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The next texture is the freebie we grabbed at the beginning, BB_AntiqueEnvelope_04.jpg.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

It’s placed at X: 18″, and Y: 19.9″, rotated 90° counterclockwise, and scaled up to 1,150%.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

After sharpening, we’ll use a clipped hue/saturation adjustment layer to desaturate the texture.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

A clipped levels adjustment layer will help us to enhance the texture further.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Blending mode: soft light @ 35% opacity.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The next texture is from Jason’s set, and is called Corkboard.

Go pick Jason’s Texture Lot One up now at the Arsenal!
Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

It’s placed centered in the composition, rotated 90° clockwise, and scaled to 55%.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

After sharpening, the blending mode should be changed to soft light @ 25% opacity.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The texture levels are coming together nicely. We’ve added grain, light noise, and small artifacts to the piece with a few layers of substance. Let’s have a look at the layers before the ultimate polishing touches.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Last details

Lossless vignette effect

There is a way to create a lossless vignette effect in Photoshop, thanks to shape layers. The first step is to draw an ellipse that fits the canvas. It should be colored in #040404.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Next, we need to use one of the tools accessible via the direct selection tool (A), in the toolbar. It will allow us to display the ellipse inverted, getting closer to the vignette. Once the active tool is the direct selection tool, we need to change the path operation button‘s setting to subtract front shape.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

The result is a very sharp edged ellipse, almost ready to be a vignette.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Next, through the layer’s properties panel, we need to feather the layer mask to 350 pixels. This creates the fuzzy edge for the vignette.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Finally, the blending mode for the vignette can be switched to soft light @ 50% opacity.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Last but not least: halftones

The last piece of the puzzle is a halftone effect. First step, to create a merged copy of the piece so far. We’ll use the CTRL/CMD+ALT/OPTION+SHIFT+E shortcut for that. It’ll create a layer containing a merged copy of the piece so far. I called it Halftones.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Once the layer is generated, it needs to be converted to a smart object.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

After resetting the color palette to default (D), we’ll use the filter gallery’s halftone effect (Filter > Filter Gallery > Sketch > Halftone pattern). We’re using a size value of 8, and a contrast value of 50.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Then, we need to change the effect’s blending mode to soft light @ 100% opacity.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

After that, we can change the layer’s blending mode to soft light @ 50% opacity.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

And our piece is now done! Here’s a look at our final layer stack.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Wrapping things up

Phew, that was a long tutorial! I hope that you enjoyed it, learned a few tricks here and there, and that your outcome matches the goals you had at the beginning.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Did I leave anything unclear? Any suggestions? Don’t hesitate to reach out in the comments below! I’ll be happy to help out.

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

Mockup your poster using the free sample below from our Poster Mockup Templates Pack and please share your work with us in the comments, by tweeting at us at @go_media, or sharing them on our Facebook page.

Free Download: Free Poster PSD Sample from Go Media

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

If you already purchased Jason’s texture set, I hope you enjoy them, and that this tutorial gave you a sense of what you’ll be able to accomplish with them. If not, go grab them while they’re hot!

Go pick Jason’s Texture Lot One up now at the Arsenal!

Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne's texture lot one

And on that note, that’s it for me! Until next time, cheers!

The post Tutorial: Building a brutalist conference poster with Jason Carne’s Texture Lot One (Free Poster Mockup Included) appeared first on Go Media™ · Creativity at work!.

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Color Linework in Photoshop | Design Tip of the Week http://gomedia.com/zine/tutorials/color-linework-in-photoshop-design-tip-of-the-week/ Mon, 31 Aug 2015 13:00:14 +0000 http://gomedia.com/?p=57237 Black and white linework is always nice, but sometimes a bit of color is needed to add a pinch of visual flavor to your delicious illustration soufflé . (Hooray cooking metaphors!) Let’s get into it and show you how to… Continue Reading »

The post Color Linework in Photoshop | Design Tip of the Week appeared first on Go Media™ · Creativity at work!.

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Black and white linework is always nice, but sometimes a bit of color is needed to add a pinch of visual flavor to your delicious illustration soufflé . (Hooray cooking metaphors!) Let’s get into it and show you how to color linework in Photoshop.

DTOTW_8-31-15_Article_Image_1

I’ll be using the heroic imagery of this guy doing a Shoryuken. (I drew him at of the Cleveland Drink and Draws, a social meet up for artists, illustrators and doodlers to hang out, drink some beer and draw cool shit.) As you can see, it’s just a graphite pencil drawing, so while the majority of it is linework, there are some tonal gradations.

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The first thing to do is to darken the drawing in the Levels settings (Image > Adjustments > Levels). Just don’t make it so dark that you’re losing detail. This will help in selecting the values of the drawing.

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Next, open your Channels palette and hold down CTRL (or Command) and click on the RGB layer. If you’re in CYMK color mode, click the CYMK layer. Notice that the everything around the drawing is now selected, but it’s the drawing itself we want selected. Go ahead and simply inverse the selection via Select > Inverse (Shift + CTRL + I).

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With the drawing selected, create a Layer Mask by clicking its icon, which is next to the Layer Style (fx) icon in the Layers Palette. You’ll notice that all of the white disappears.

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Choose a your favorite color, select the Brush Tool (B) and color over your drawing. Because the Layer Mask is activated, it will only affect that which was selected (the drawing).

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I went ahead and added a few more elements: a radial background using a vector from one of the Arsenal vector packs, a faint texture layer and the word “WIN.”  And listen, if you don’t think you can do this, remember to tell yourself: SURE YOU CAN! (Shoryuken.) Get it!?

Sorry, I couldn’t help myself. That joke isn’t even original and rather old. But oh well. Hooray puns!

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Tune in again next time! (“Next time” meaning a week from now.)

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